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August 1985 No, 41 



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95 p 



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OUR GUIDE TO 
COMPUTER 
AND CURE 

PROGRAMME 
FOR PROFIT 

WIN A SAGA 

GRAPHICS 

TABLET 








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IfimpstOnDisc,,. 
important but expecled change m 
mputer nwket;Tha need br more storage a 
ter ftccess is growing all tip tirpe, The utilisation 
ofbisQ unijs as a system for program storage and 
loading is long overdue for the lorrje rriarta it, 
ItH Kempston^ compact Disc Interlace 
competitive price of only £85.00 
i sophisticated storage 
are available, to the 
honte comdii* 
Tin a realisable 






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Contents 




MM.M p 5 BBT 5EUMC iPO« HMBAZHH. 



EDITORIAL Editor Hill Scolding Deputy editor Jtthn Gilbert Staff writer* Chris Bourne, Clare 

Edgdey Designer Craig Kennedy Editorial secretary Norisah Fenn Publisher Neil Wood 

ADVERTISING Advertising manager Rob Cameron Deputy advertisement manager I ouise 

Fanthurpe Advertisement sale* executive Kalhy McLennan Production a&sislanl Jim 

MeClurc Advertisement secretary Linda I-vereSl 

MAGAZINE SERVICES Subscriptions manager Carl Dunne 

TELEPHONE All departments 01-251 6222 

Sinclair User is published monthly by EMAP Business & Computer Publications 

Cover photograph Sheila Rock for Roland Rat Enterprises Ltd. 



SOFTWARE 




TOP 30 9 

Latest software chart toppers 

SPECTRUM SOFTWARE 15 

Exclusive previews of Juggernaut and 
Southern Belle. Find the murderer in 
Cluedo, run with Roland Rat and 
fight the Bulge, Jet Set Willy II gets 
the thumbs down, and Tapper gets a 
classic 



l«fli 



QL HARDWARE 37 

John Lambert looks at extra memory 
from PCML and tests the Delta disc 
interface 

SPECTRUM HARDWARE 39 

A keyboard upgrade from Transform, 
a Microframc disc interface and a load 
of Interface III 




Roland Rat's Race to fame, page 15 

QL SOFTWARE 31 

An exclusive dig at QL Gardener, it 
flash through MicroAPL and a look at 
the QC Compiler 

BUSINESS SOFTWARE 69 

Stock Manager from OCP for the 
KDOS disc system, Decision Maker 
from Brainpower, and Classic 
Bookkeeping 

ADVENTURE 92 

Richard Price takes The Helm, plays 
Dead at the Controls and undertakes 
a classic quest in Dun Darach 
HIT SQUAD 96 

Bill Scolding defies warnings from the 
exorcist and drops in on Legend's 
{Complex hideout 



It's got to be Gordons Micrvjrame* page 39 



■MMiHfflfllUHl 



MACHINE CODE 46 

Marcus Jeffery pops into the 
Spectrum stack and finds a home for 
assembled programs 
ENTRY POINT 55 

John Gilbert continues his series for 
Spectrum beginners with a keypad 
joystick arcade game 

HELPLINE 103 

Andrew Hewson struggles with his 
flickering attributes 



LISTINGS 




What ktriv these people gat to laugh about? page 96 



PROGRAM PRINTOUT 77 

Spectrum turns Shopkeeper and 
rotates its characters while the QL 
slips some discs in a novel version of 
Towers of Hanoi. Try your hand at 
educational strategy in Target, and 
search for nuclear waste on the sea-bed 
in isotopes. 



FEATURES 



PROGRAMS FOR PROFIT 52 

Written any good games recently? 
Clare Edgeley shows how to get them 
published 

MAINTENANCE 60 

Wendie Pearson inspects the Mr Fixits 
of the repair racket. If you have a 
blown Spectrum read on 




Advice on Spectrum repain. page ft? 



REGULARS 



NEWS 5 

Maxwell takes over from Sir Clive 

MAXWELL SIMON 6 

Our hero falls on bad times 

ZX WORD 8 

QL NEWS 10 

Met acumen gets its just reward 

LETTERS t1 

ZAP CHAT 13 

SINCLAIR SURGERY 45 

BOOKS 75 

A really Capital beginners book 

ADVENTURE HELPLINE 89 

COMPETITION 101 

Win a Saga graphics system 

SOFTWARE DIRECTORY 106 

Return of the popular index 

SOFTWA RE PUBLISHERS 1 09 

Round up of program producers 

NEXT MONTH 113 

GREMLIN 1 14 

Latest too-hot-to handle gossip 



If you would like to contribute to Situ lait Umr please send programs or articles to: 

Sineiair User i EMAP Business & Computer Publications, Priory Court, 30-32 Farringdon Lane, London EOR iAKJ 

Original programs should be Ml cassette and articles should be typed, We cannot undertake to return them unless a stamped-addrcssed envelope 

is Included. 

VFe pay £20 for each program printed and £50 for star programs. 

Typeset by Saffron Graphics Ltd, London ECL Printed by Peterboro' Wefa> Woodstone, Peterborough. 

Distributed by EMAP Pubbcations Lid, © Copyright 1985 Sinclair Uiet ISSN No 0262- 5458 



ABC 



Jun-Dcc 1984 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 




muM-ii'iiu-mi!.-,!...!.-,, 



I tit NUAOI 




ERIK THE VIKINGS 



Until you've seen the low, low prices in 
our Spectrum Club Magazine. Light up 
your bank manager's face by getting 
Shadowfire for just £5.95 (saving £4), 
steal yourself a bargain with Spyhunter at 
only £4,95, or grab a Wriggler at 
£3.95 (which enables you to enter our 
super competition). Need we go on? There 
are over 200 more products we could telt 
you about. 

So what's the catch we hear you say? 
How many tapes must I commit to buy in 
a year? The answer is none. Once you 
have joined our Club, for an annual 
subscription of £5.00 you need buy 
nothing! 

But wait. There's more to this Club than 
just the £'s you'll save on software. As a 
Member you will receive a bi-monthly 
magazine, packed with in-depth reviews 
(including lots of screen photos), 
competitions to enter, game playing tips 
and tots, lots more. Hurry now. If you 
apply for membership within four weeks 
we will give you a £1 voucher towards 
your first purchase. So send off the 
coupon now and we'll send you our most 
recent Club Magazine by return, tf you are 
not absolutely delighted we wiil give you 
your money back! 



KELVIN HOUSE 

TOTTERIDGE AVENUE 

HIGH WYCOMBE 

HP13 6XG 

(0494) 460586 



MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION SU 8/85 

Pledse enrol me as a member of the Mr. Software Spectrum Club, for 
which I enclose E5.00' . 

I understand you will send me your most recent Club Magazine by return 
and that If I'm not completely satisfied after two weeks I can claim a 
refund. 

Name i a lock caps i 

Address 

■■ j ' lj ' .......... _..._ . _ . ......., r ,, 1 ,. lll 

Postcode... , 

Cheque/ Post aJ Order No 

Or change my Access/ Visa account 

□□□□□□□□□□□□□aann 

<*£& applies to UK & BFPO oniy, Other fates am £7 Europe. £9 USA & 
Middle East, C12 Australia, Far East & S, Africa.] 



(J Clive - in good hands ? 




ENERGETIC entrepreneur 
Robert Maxwell has jumped 
in where the City fears to 
tread and has bought a con- 
trolling share of Sinclair 
Research. The deal 
gives Maxwell, 




owner of the Daily Mirrors 
75 per cent of the shares in 
return for £12m cash. That 
money is required to pay off 
Tirnex, Thorn EMI and Sin- 
clair's bankers. 

Sir Clive himself retains 
about eight per cent of the 
company, and the title of life 
president, but he no longer 
has a seat on the board. 
Instead, he has a five year 
contract as technical consul- 
tant, to head research and 
development at the com- 
pany. The C5 company, 
Sinclair Vehicles, is not in- 
volved in the deal. 

Sinclair Research has 
been drifting towards the 
rocks for months, following 
gross over-production at 
Christmas. That left the 
company with over £30m of 
stocks, many of which are 
thought to be QLs. 

Robert Maxwell appears 
to have bought himself a 
bargain; only a year ago Sin- 
clair Research was valued at 
£100m. His first task will be 
to find a new chief execu- 
tive, to replace Sir Clive. 

As for Sir Clive, he claims 
to be happy about the situa- 
tion. He says his new posi- 
tion as life president is 
'grandiose but meaningless 11 
and stresses that all planned 



Who is Robert Maxwell ? 



ROBERT MAXWELL, the 
new owner of Sinclair Research, 
is one of the most colourful 
figures in the British business 
world. Bom in Czechoslovakia 
in 192 J, he was captured by the 
Nazis during (he invasion of 
France in 1940. He. escaped, 
and fled xo Britain, where he 
joined the army and later took 
pan in the liberation of Europe 
in J 944. 

He has no formal education, 
and his main company, Perga- 
mon Press, was founded in 
1951, From seven publications, 
Pcrgamon is now a largje conv 
pany with over 6000 books. 

Apart from Sinclair Research 
and Pergamon, he also owns 
BPCC, a major printing works, 
and recently bought the Mirror 



Group of newspapers as well as 
Oxford United Football Club 

Politically, Maxwell Identifies 
himself with the Labour party, 
and was MP for Buckingham 
for six. years. He is still a 
mem bcr of the party , although a 
controversial one. 

Maxwell regards his acquisi- 
tion of both Sinclair and the 
Mirror Group as patriotic enter- 
prises, as well as sound business 
investments. In the football are- 
na he had to settle for Oxford 
United, having failed to buy 
Manchester United, 

He is also celebrated , or noto- 
rious., for the intense personal 
interest he takes in his com- 
panies. Fleet Street ts full of 
tales, many do doubt embroi- 
dered, of the results of unex- 




pected visits by a mackiniushcd 
Maxwell to the jWinw offices. 
Although he does not hold the 
position of chief executive of 
Sinclair Research t as he does at 
the Minor, there is no reason to 
doubt thai Maxwell will stamp 
his personality on the company 
as forcefully as on other busi- 
ness ventures. 



new products will continue 
to be developed 'as before 1 , 
It is difficult to believe that 
he feels no distress at all at 
losing control of his com- 
pany j but he has always 
claimed to have no interest 
in financial matters or in- 
deed personal wealth, and as 
such may welcome the 
opportunity to spend more 
time in the laboratory. 

"We welcome Maxwell 
with open arms," says Joe 
Woods, marketing manager 
for Terry Blood, the sole 
UK distributor of Sinclair 
hardware. "It's the best 
thing that could have hap- 
pened to the industry and to 
Sinclair, The company 
needed to be managed in a 
much more professional way 
and you can't get much 
more professional than 
Robert Maxwell, 1 ' 

Woods confirms thai the 
current distribution deal, 
which runs into 1936, still 
stands, and that Terry 
Blood continues to be 'fully 
involved with Sinclair Re- 
search.' 

Maxwell may not find life 
on the high-tech seas all 
plain sailing, however. 
Acorn, which was bailed out 
by Olivetti five months ago 
for a similar sum, has once 
again asked chat its shares be 
suspended, this time at 11 
pence. The £12m pumped 
in has apparently gone. 

The success of Sinclair 
Research, therefore, must 
depend on new products, if 
current sales arc falling. Its 
tarlier glories came about 
through taking tremendous 
risks where conventional 
business thought scorned 
the whole concept of mass 
home computing. 

Whether Maxwell is pre- 
pared to back such risks 
with hard cash in future 
developments is a question 
which will continue to exer- 
cise the industry for many, 
many months to come. 

more rwwt on page 6 



SINCLAIR USER August 198$ 



Which? report slams C5 



A KIT to link two C5 bat- 
teries together is to be re- 
leased by Sinclair Vehicles 
m response t criticism of 
the variable range jf the 
machine. According to 
spokesman Bill Nichols, the 
kit will cost in the region of 
£35.00, inclusive of the 
second battery. 

A recent report by con- 
sumer organisation Which? 
criticised the CS on range, 
speed and reliability, Ii sug- 
gested that those limitations 
did not compare favourably 
with a bicycle, given the 
price of the C5 — £441.85 
with the kit of extras. 

On safety, the report said 
it was difficult to see in 
t raffle and the driver was 
vulnerable at bumper 
height. It did however 
praise the C5 as 'fun and 
free of fuss" in the current 




CS at twine the ipetd? 

driving conditions, 

Nichols says the speed is 
fixed by the law to allow 
drivers without insurance to 
use the vehicle. "If we had 
produced a faster vehicle," 
he says, "we would have 
produced other refinements 
as well. We claimed a range 
of up to 20 miles, ncu always 
that. Tests show the range 
to vary widely depending on 
traffic conditions, gradients, 
and road surface." He says 
the new battery kit should 
counter criticisms of range, 
and that Sinclair Vehicles 



was working on the battery 
and gearbox. 

As for safety, he said 
there were no industry stan- 
dards for the visibility of 
vehicles. Most organisa- 
tions, such as the A A and 
Department of Transport, 
regarded the C5 as "no less 
safe than a bicycle". Nichols 
stresses that so far only two 
accidents with C5s have 
occurred, neither, he 
claims, involving other vehi- 
cles and both "induced by 
the driver, with no serious 
injury as a result." 



A Komplex 
solution 

HALF-PRICED copies of 
Komplex are being offered 
to disenchanted owners of 
The Great Space Race by 
Software house Legend . 

If purchasers send back 
the poster enclosed in the 
package to Legend, together 
with a cheque for £4.95 they 
will receive a copy of Kom- 
plex in return. 

Legend chairman John 
Peel is worried about the 
effect that TGSR has had on 
customer support for the 
company. "We're making 
the offer because we feel 
that TGSR failed to live up 
to many people's expecta- 
tions. The fact that we 
actually lost over £200,000 
on TGSR is not much con- 
solation to people who 
bought the game and didn't 
like it. We take our custom- 
ers seriously. 




S I SfCL A I R USER A mttsi J 9*5 



News 



Wafer-scale venture 
may boost Sinclair 



THE WAFER-SCALE 
chip, which uses a four-inch 
disc of silicon to hold the 
equivalent power of hun- 
dreds of conventional chips, 
is almost set for production. 
Sir Give Sinclair has 
announced the successful 
development of a technique 
for producing such chips at 



a cost and reliability rate 
which makes them viable for 
mass-production. 

Metalab, the high-tech 
think tank set up by Sir 
Clive over a year ago for just 
such developments, appears 
to have succeeded firs.t in a 
field where research has 
been going on for many 




Sir CAwe't wafer — on the ngki 



years. A spokesman for 
Sinclair Research says the 
first wafer- scale product, a 
solid-state disc drive for the 
QL, is still on schedule for 
production later this year. 

Meanwhile, plans for a 
£50m plant to exploit the 
new technology have been 
shelved by new owner 
Robert Maxwell, Instead, 
the company is looking for 
partners to help develop the 
new chip. Under the take- 
over deal, Sinclair Research 
retains the patent on the 
wafer-scale chip, but Sir 
Clive is to be allowed to 
continue private research on 
fifth generation computers, 
at his own expense. 

In the event of Sir dive's 
personal fortune being suffi- 
cient to sustain the neces- 
sary research, in an area 
where companies and gov- 
ernments are spending bil- 
lions of dollars , Sinclair Re- 
search will have a first op- 
tion on new products with 
Sir Clive retaining the pa- 
tents. 

Regardless of that, 
however, the new chip! if it 
lives up to the claims made, 
is a genuine technological 
breakthrough. 



The Spanish 
connection 

A MAJOR L international 
piracy operation, involving 
software from Britain's big- 
gest software houses, has 
been uncovered, 

Inforprcss, a Spanish 
publishing company , pro- 
duces a cassette magazine 
which provides its custom- 
ers with 10 programs a 
month. Those pieces of soft- 
ware have included Jet Set 
Willy from Software Pro- 
jects, Danger Mouse in 
Douhk Trouble from Crea- 
tive Sparks and Scuba Dive 
from Durrell Software. 
Other companies which 
have had software pirated by 
Inforprcss are Gargoyle 
Games, Vortex, Mikm-Gen, 
Softek and Artie. 

Mike Meek of Mikm-Gen 
says: "We ^rc sickened that 
the industry is being ripped 
off in this way. Recently I 
have been writing to maga- 
zines telling the people 
about our experiences of 
piracy and trying to get the 
trade to take note." 

Some software houses are 
not so keen to pursue the 
issue as they believe nothing 
can be done about interna- 
tional piracy. A spokesman 
for Durell Software says: 
"We have been ripped off in 
Spain so many times thai 
we've lost count." 



Kempston takes 
DOS for drive 

MANUFACTURE of the 
SPDOS disc interface, and 
all other Spectrum Pro- 
duel s, has been stopped by 
Watford Electronics. SPDOS 
is now produced by Kemp- 
ston which has changed the 
name to KDOS. 

Kempston has reconfi- 
gured the package and in- 
cluded a Centronics and 
joystick port with the 8K 
ROM-based operating sys- 
tem. Also included is a util- 
ity which can transfer tape 
software to disc. 



Czech deal for Maxwell? 



LARGE NUMBERS of 
Sinclair machines may soon 
find themselves behind the 
Iron Curtain. Sinclair Re- 
search has been trying to 
strike a major deal to supply 
computers to Eastern bloc 
countries for some months , 
and the recent relaxation of 
export regulations on hi- 
tech products removes one 
of the last hurdles. 

The strategy has been en- 
dorsed by new owner 
Robert Maxwell who, born 
in Czechoslavakia, has 



strong business links with 
the Eastern bloc. He has 
decided to personally head 
the sales drive, and that 
added impetus may well lip 
the balance in favour of an 
advantageous deal. 

The move is clearly an 
attractive way of clearing the 
£30m stocks of unsold com- 
puters and televisions which 
brought Sinclair Research to 
its knees in the first place. 
Maxwell is not particularly 
worried about the silicon 
mountain he has acquired. 



"I don't think the stocking 
is so horrendous," he says. 
"We have a chance of selling 
some to the USSR and Bul- 
garia providing we don't 
break the rules." 

The Russian market looks 
particularly attractive. The 
Soviet Government has 
grandiose plans to introduce 
computers into all its 
schools; a contract on that 
scale is surely a mouth- 
watering prospect for any 
home computer company. 

mem news on page 8 



SINCLAIR USER August 1 985 



News 



The winning formulae 



QMNIBOT robots aad Ultimate goody 
bags were won by S Bowdcn of Hayes, 
Middlesex;, Jeffrey Guv of Latham, Lan- 
cashire and Neil Gidjnan of Stoke-on- 
Trent, Staffordshire in our May Ulti- 
mate ewmpetiuori. 

The seven runnm-up. wlio ilso re- 
ceived goody hags, were: Stephen 
Cbown, Seafurd, East Sussex; Neil Wal- 
ker, Sunderland, Tyne and Wear; 
S Miles, Merseyside, Wural; W Arm- 
Hfong. Hmi^htfin-le-SpriiJs, Tyne and 
Wear; A Were, Gowtey, Oxfordshire; 
K Pridmort, Ankby, East Yorkshire; 
and TrUlM Kay«, Reading, Berkshire. 

The 100 winners of the Formula One 
compeiiiion in the June issue were: 
Bruno Grahpa d Vsxese, Italy j Ufcolini 
Gabriel*, Roma, Italy; C A Man in, 
Hxyward* Heath, West Sussex l Guy 
Corvexs., Berinaen, Belgium; Marie 
MuXilly, Reading, Berkshire, Mark 
Nunc, TFiihcrsea, East Yorkshire; 

A O'Cnnnetl, Liverpool L25; Barry 

Lennm, Raby Mere, Merseyskle; Paul 
Drysdale, Kirkcudbrightshire, Sew- 
lacd; Stephen Biacldetlge, Kendal, 
Cmnbria; Ian Much, Chellasiori,. Der- 
by; Ian Grant, Watford; 1 Brett, Burton - 
ofl-Trent, Staffordshire; David Brown, 
London SMFl; K Ridley, Holywcmd, 
County Down: DRWhiitalL. Chrisi- 
church, Dorset; A D Kenning*. Crow- 
thorne, Berkshire; Alex Graham, Clif- 
ton., Bedfordshire; 1 Dnf, Dunbarton- 
shire, Scotland; Michael Faulder, Cock- 
ennouth, Cumbria; Matthew Stone, 
Didsbury, Manchester; A Walton, 
Fartiwarth, Bolton; Peter Duggaji, 



Romford, Esses; Colin John Hay, Rum- 
lord, Esses; Chris Dickson, MiddLes- 
brouRh, Cleveland; S Holt, Rn5«nd«le, 
Lancashire; Graham White,, Ingates- 
tfloe. Eases; D J Stew, Witney, Dtfnrd- 
shire; P W Glecd, Cowley, Oxfordshire; 
K Alexander, Murden. Surrey; P Bas- 
neit, Wallasey, Merseyside; Robert 
Hall, Witney, Oxfordshire; D Bevjng- 
ton Smith, Parley, Surrey: Kan Wai 
Wong, GilliBiahiin, Kenl; Nigel Rae, 
Lanark:, Scotland; Robert Vogt, Ayles- 
bury, Buckinghamshire; Avril Green- 
land, Hammersmith, London W6; Juao 
Ftlipe Fafcao Roque, Goimbra, Portug- 
al; Hani Abu Rahmeh, London SWl; 
Robert Jejj, Dundee, Scotland; Edward 
Stun, Beverley, North H umberside; 
Shane Parker, Bristol, Avon; Karl 
McConaack, Stafford- Mavnard Paton, 
Doncasrer, South Yorkshire; Geretnt 
Jones, Khonddu, South Wain; 
G R Dormer, Kozcai, North Hamp- 
shire; C Gibbs, Cheshunt, Hertford- 
shire; K Welbom f Knaresborough, 
North Yorkshire; P Dobson, Harrogate, 
North Yorkshire; Dean Spencer, Noi- 
tingham; Aaron Warbuton, Beliasu P C 
Inskip. Kings winford. West Midlands; 
Chi Wall Vau, London NWI; 
A P Hooper, Taunton, Somerset; 
W Kemp, Westerham, Kent; James 
Turner, Oakwood, Derby; G Zentner, 
Ha/efiran, Jerusalem; Andrew Watson, 
Woodthorpc, Yorkshire; Adrian Lright- 
oti, Felstcd, Essejt; A J Logic Campbetl, 
Cheltenham, Gloucestershire; Haydn 
Psdmore, Woodlesford, Ijeeds; Karina 
Bale, London SWl 5; Stuart Barrick, 



Norwich. Norfolk; W C Erith, Camber 
ky, Surrey; Paul Barr, Hull; Mask 
Chung, I^venshultne, Manchester; Bar- 
ry Haddow, Alva, ClatkEnarmshire; 
Jonathan Atigeloni, Swansea, West Gla- 

nwrpin; Peter Phelps Jones, Leeds; 
G Ward, Reuie, BFPO 24; Ian Doggett, 
Kirtum, Ipswich; David Stagg, Biggin 
Hill, Kent; Martin Johansson, Hjo, 
Sweden; W H Grauman*, Haacht, Bel- 
gium, John Stephenson, Church Strel- 
ton, Shropshire; P J Irwin, Chiswick, 
London; Robert Whinaker, Dunboynt, 
County Mcath, Ireland; KC Grove, 
RAF Laarhruch, BFPO 43; Robert 
Morris, Croydon, Surrey; Michael 
Grove, Warleya, West Midlands; 
M White, Bath, Avon; I J Grayson, 
Banstead, Surrey; Mr T Irwin, Bristol; 
Paul O'Ncil, Worsley, Greater Manches- 
ter; Paul Carson, Ashford Common, 
Middlesex; NP Gardner, Stroud,, 
Gloucestershire; Hawl Joy Hart, Beek- 
enham, Kent; E Goodman, Barnslcy, 
South Yorkshire; tan Calderbank, Hud- 
dtrstield. West Yorkshire; James E 
Taylor, Oldham; Paul Sadler, Ipswich; 
R Van der VHs, Haarlem Holland; Lee 
Smith, South Nuifteld, Surrey; Gareth 
^llhims, Ruthin. Clwyd; Atirtair 
Verheijea, Wiml, Merseyside; Martin 
Donnelly, Edinburgh; Jeff Bate. Lon- 
don SW| 5; P Kelly, Doncester; Peter 
£ammitl, Wirral, Merseyside; S P E- 
vans, Sekly Oak, Birmingham, 

All receive copies of Formula One 
from CRL, The winner of the Grand 
Pria video cassette is A Quinn of Red- 
ditch, Worcestershire. 



Hackers in 
the dock 

ROBERT Schifrrcn, 21, of 
Edgware, north London and 
Stephen Gold, 29, of Shef- 
field have been charged with 
a further nine counts under 
Section 1 of the 1981 
Forgery and Counterfeiting 
Act. 

Appearing at Bow Street 
Magistrates Court un June 
12 to answer two accusa- 
tions, each involving alleged 
unauthorised entries into 
Prestel computers, the pro- 
secution announced a furth- 
er five charges against Schif- 
reen and four against Gold, 

Both men own Spectrum 
computers and were first 
arrested last March — see 
June's Sinclair User. Bow 
Street magistrate R BartJc 
again put the defendants on 
unconditional bail and re- 
manded the case until July 4 
to give the defence lime to 
prepare its case. 



ZXWORD byHenry 



Howarth 



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2 


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I 4 U 5 L 


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23 
26 


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4. Not a. straightforward addressing; mode (8) 

8, Token MPs form joystick company (8) 

9. ADA rate a misfit with place for information i4,4j 

10. Address to a 'Blues' gathering? (8} 

1 1 . Lucky opportunity for reset key (5) 

12. Sort of storage measured in kilograms (4) 
Fraction of hen 64 ( Q ) 
Load a Z80 mnemonic (2) 
BBC monitor? (2) 

Consistency of laser fight sources (9) 
Jump over instructions in a large bo* (4) 

22. A pornographic one could be nast\ 

23. Cyclic binary system sounds like dull programming 
(4,45 

It's processed in i dry run (4,4) 
King or me to form WalJy's label (8) 
See five, we hear, for example (8) 



]4, 
IS. 
17 H 

l«. 
2L 



14 
26. 

27. 



Down 

1. It could be CjtNcrty, in an upper sort of ease (.8.) 

2. Temporarily stores on reels of tape (d) 

3. What a well written program must be (10) 

4. Addressing mode found in the back of the hook by the 
editor (7} 

5. Matrix element on the printer? (3) 

6. Ear rated poorly for access speed (4,4) 

7. Axe College of Further Education plan for teletext (.6) 
13. Performance tests for hardware or software (10) 

16. Not a foreign market for home computers, perhaps (8) 

17. Tiddlcs plays with knobs in the west (8) 

19. Finish to chess encounter? (3,4) 

20. Sort of programming which follows a straight line (6) 

21. hurt of track insect originated (6) 

25. Initialised analogue to digital converter f3) 

Solution m page 1 10 



SINCLAIR USER August W8S 



New releases 



RUPERT, that trendy bear 
in yellow-check trousers, 
has made ir to the computer 
screen. Join him in search of 
a riotous night in Rupert 
and the Toymaker's party 
from Quicksilva. Out in Au- 
gust at £7.95. 

US Gold is to launch Pole 
Position . Licensed from 
Atari, it will be in the shops 
this month for £7.95, 

Melbourne House is 
bringing out a number of 
games. Terrormolinos is a 
graphic adventure about the 
trials of a Spanish package 
holiday. Full of greasy chips 
and screaming kids, it sounds 
fun and will be out in Au- 
gust for £7.95. 

Mugsy's Revenge follows 
the success of Mugsy and is 
an adventure. Ii should be 
available in September at 
£7.95. 

Marsport from Gargoyle 
is the first in a trilogy in 
which you have to retrieve 
secret plans from an aban- 
doned spaceport on Mars. 
Look out for it in September 
at £9.95, 

Firebird is to release two 
games — Cyiu for the Silver 
range at £2.50 in August and 
Elite for the Gold range 
possibly in September. 

Cyiu sounds very similar 
to Ultimate's Men 8. Elite 
is a simulation combat and 
trading game in which you 
must voyage through eight 
galaxies and 2000 planets in 
your space ship. 

The Secret Diary of 
Adrian Mole aged l3 3 /t is 
now a computer game. 
Programmed by Level 9 for 
Mosaic, you must help 
Adrian work out the prob- 
lems which crop up in his 
young but complicated life. 
To be released in September 
H £9:95. 

From Silversoft comes 
Baal — an arcade adventure 
with similar graphics to 
Alien 8 (again?). Baal, an 
apprentice devil must prove 
his worth before being 
allowed to steal souls from 



earth. Work your way up 
the levels to get out of hell, 
Baal will be out in August 
for around £9.00. 

Silversoft is also releasing 
Greatest Hits for £7 95 — a 
compilation tape containing 
Orbiter, Ground Attack, 
Worse Things Happen at 
Sea and Hyperaction. 

Boxing games have taken 
the software houses by 
storm. Roeco, from Grem- 
lin sounds very similar to 
Punch Out!! the arcade 
game and follows close on 
the heels of Frank Bruno's 
Boxing by Elite. Roeco is 
available for £7.95, 

Monty on the Run to be 
released in October for 
£7.95, continues the saga of 
the accident-prone mole. 
Help Monty escape to Brazil 
by getting him to the port 
before the ship sales. 

Blade Runner from CRL 
is based loosely on the film 
and arcade game. Protect 
civilians in the crowded 
streets by destroying 
androids. It will be out in 
August for £8.95. 

Seiclone from Hewson is 
an adventure space movie 
played in a similar way to 
Dragon tore. Solve prob- 
lems while battling with the 
Seiddabs to gain control 
over them. Seiclone will be 
out in early October at £7.95 

Mikro-Gen has come up 
with a box of tricks which 
will overwrite the Spectrum 
ROM and enhance the 
memory by 50 percent. The 
hardware will hold part of 
the program and also the 
tape loading routine. Sha- 
dow of the Unicorn will be 
the first to use the hardware 
and will be launched at the 
PCW show in September for 
£14,95. It is a role playing 
adventure in which you con- 
trol 10 characters. 

Elite is to bring out Inter- 
national Basketball at the 
end of this month for £5.99. 
Stay in control of the field 
and learn to pass and handle 
the ball with your team. 




1 


SOFT AID 


QUICKSILVA/VARIOUS 


2 


SPY HUNTER 


US GOLD 


3 


WORLD SEMES BASEBALL 


IMAGINE 


4 


STAMON 


MELBOURNE HOUSE 


5 


SHAD0WHRE 


BEYOND 


E 


o FINDERS KEEPERS 


MASTERTR0NIC 


7 


ottUCf L£E 


US GOLD 


a 


o EVERYONE'S A WA11Y 


MIKRO-GEN 


9 


o ROCKY HORROR SHOW 


CRL 


10 


o FORMULA ONE SIMULATOR 


MASTERTRDNIC 


11 


o DEATH STAR INTERCEPTOR 


SYSTEMS 


12 


,-> DRAG0NT0HC 


HEWSON CONSULTANTS 


13 


^ MOON CRESTA 


INCENTIVE 


14 


RAID OVER MOSCOW 


US GOLD 


IS 


o GYR0N 


FIREBIRD 


16 


■ -■ MINDER 


DKTRQNICS 


17 


o GREMUNS 


ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 


IB 


& BOOTY 


FIREBIRD 


19 


o CHUCKIE EGG II 


A&F 


20 


o HERBERTS DUMMY RON 


MIKRO-GEN 


21 


o QA1EY THOMPSONS DECATHLON OCEAN 


n 


o MATCH DAY 


OCEAN 


23 


<i TAPPER 


US GOLD 


24 


oALBtl 


ULTIMATE 


25 


o GRAND NATIONAL 


ELITE 


26 


o MANIC MINER 


SOFTWARE PROJECTS 


27 


o CHILLER 


MASTERTRONIC 


■ 


& STARSTRIKE 3D 


REALTIME 


29 


O DUN DARACH 


GARGOYLE 


30 


a BRIAN JACKS CHALLENGE 


MARTECH 



SINCLAIR t'SER August MS 



= QL News 



QL beats the field 



THE MICROCOMPUTER 
of the Year is the QL, 
according to the judges of 
the British Microcomputer 
Awards, 

The award was accepted 
by Sir Give Sinclair who 
received a standing ovation 
at a ceremony in London, 
arranged by Thames Televi- 
sion, the Sunday Times and 
VNU Publications, He also 
picked up the VNU Educa- 
tional Award for the Spec- 
trum version of Logo, prog- 
rammed for Sinclair Re- 
search by LCSL 

Psion chairman David 
Potter also received a trophy 
when the Psion bundled ex- 
change packages for the QL 
won the Thames Home 
Software Award, Matthew 
Gaved of Psion commented 
ecstatically: "Fantastic, 

marvellous. We are very, 



very pleased. It is good news 
for Sinclair and it shows that 
the QL is still alive and 
well." 

The company has recently 
shown its continued support 
for the QL with the launch 
of Match Point. The game 
is a conversion of the best- 
selling Spectrum tennis 
simulation. 

Also 3 a new version of 
Archive is to be made avail- 
able. Called the Archive 



Runtime Module it is a 
stripped down version of the 
original which will compile 
data manipulation programs 
written in its own Super- 
Basic derived language. 

Psion believes that the 
new version of Archive will 
mainly be used by software 
houses who want to compile 
routines for the program. It 
will, however, also be avail- 
able on the consumer 
market. 




Jir Clive, lit up u>iih dehghi 



Boo for Basic 

A COMPLAINT regarding 
Super Basic has earned a re- 
buke for Sinclair Research 
from the Advertising Stan- 
dards Authority, 

It said Sinclair could not 
claim its QL language to be 
"the most powerful Basic 
ever devised*. 



Printing 
in protocol 

A HARDWARE system 
which makes the QL com- 
patible with any type of 
printer has been launched 
by A Line Dataspeed Ser- 
vices. 

The company offers a 
Protocol converter which 
connects virtually any type 
of computer to any printer. 
It does not matter whether 
the printer uses serial, para- 
llel or IEEE-488 standards. 

More information can be 
obtained from A Line 
Dataspeed Services Ltd, 3 
Auburn Road, Blaby, 
Leicester, LES 3DR. 



Pascal makes the grade 



A PROUD Metacomco has 
just received its ISO valida- 
tion certificate for the Pas- 
cal development kit. 

The ISO standard is 
closely adhered to by manu- 
facturers of major business 
software publishers. It is 
something of a coup for the 
Metacomco package to be 
included amongst those 
which are acknowledged as 
meeting the standard. 

A spokesman for the com- 



pany says, "We have sold 
500 packages so far, which is 
good considering the state of 
the market. We arc also 
thinking about special pro- 
ductions for universities. 
We may give educational 
establishments 30 or 40 per 
cent reductions," 

Sinclair User was the first 
magazine to point out the 
outstanding quality of the 
Metacomco package in its 
Classic review in July. 



The future 
operation 

THE OS -9 operating sys- 
tem, capable of turning the 
QL into the equivalent of a 
high speed mini computer, 
is on the way courtesy of 
disc drive manufacturer 
Cumana. 

OS-9 will be available as a 
hardware add-on in Septem- 
ber, with QL compatible 
disc drives and interface. 

Clive Martin of Cumana 
says, "We see OS-9 as being 
the operating system of the 
future for both the QL and 
the BBC microcomputer." 

Planned software for OS- 
9 includes word processors, 
databases, a fast version of 
Basic and a C compiler. 
Cumana also plans to add 
hard disc; on the hardware 
front, Martin comments, 
"The whole system will be 
very Unix-like". 

A data sheet on the disc 
drives and operating system 
is available from Cumana, 
The Pines Trading Estate, 
Broad Street, Guildford, 
Surrey, GU3 3BH. 



Drive to win 

HYPERDR1VE is the first 
QL motor racing game. 

The package is to be laun- 
ched by the English Soft- 
ware Company. It features 
3D perspective graphics, 
five levels of play, sound 
effects and a joystick control 
option. 



Basic compiler arrives 



A FULL SuperBasic com- 
piler, priced at around 
£80.00 is the latest in a range 
of products announced by 
Digital Precision, 

The two-pass optimising 
compiler, which will work 
on all versions of the QL 
starting with AH, provides 
facilities found on few other 
such products. Most in- 
teresting is its ability to opti- 
mise execution times of the 
object code when it has been 



compiled from SuperBasic. 
Tony Tebby's Toolkit 

commands are also sup- 
ported. The compiler will go 
one better than SuperBasic 
by supporting a nine digit 
numeric format instead of 
the usual seven f 

Freddy Vaecha of Digital 
Precision says, "We believe 
that the compiler is a market 
beater. At the moment wc 
regard Psion Chess as being 
number one in the QL 



charts but the compiler will 
replace it in that slot." 

Other Digital Precision 
products due for release are 
an astrology program and 
two arcade games. Vaecha is 
pleased with the astrology 
software: "It uses astro- 
nomy calculations and pro- 
duces a detailed character 
analysis". 

All products from Digital 
Precision should be avail- 
able at the end of August, 



10 



SINCLAIR USER AugMtmS 



Letters = 



Putting Denton's 
record straight 



HAVING read the article 
about Denton Designs in 
your July issue, there are a 
few points I would like to 
make. 

Firstly, in 12 months, 
with a quarter of Imagine's 
programming Staff, they 
have produced more and 
better products than Im- 
agine did in it's last 12 
months. This would seem to 
indicate that when at Im- 
agine they were grossly mis- 
managed, and/or working 
for themselves has spurred 
them to greater produc- 
tivity. 

Secondly, whilst I 
appreciate Steve Cain saying 
that I have calibre, I do not 
understand his reference to 
'cock ups ! . At Imagine I was 
in charge of sales and 
marketing, which are gener- 
ally regarded as having been 
Imagine's strengths. Denton 
does not have sales or 
marketing because they rec- 
ognise their lack of ability in 
these areas; that is why 
Beyond and Ocean do it for 
them. Steve Cain is not 
qualified to pass comment 
on my skills, just as I am not 
on his skills, 

Thirdly, it is refreshing to 
find that Denton Designs 
has inherited Imagine's lack 
of false modesty. 

To conclude, I wish Den- 
ton Designs and all who 
work there, the best for the 
future. Their skills and ori- 
ginality are what this market 
needs and make a happy 
change from the plagiarized 
junk produced by many 
people. 

Bruce Everiss, 
Wirral, Merseyside 
# The comments made by 
Steve Cain of Denton Designs 
in respect of Bruce Everiss' s 
capabilities as a sates and 
marketing director are not en- 
dorsed by the editorial staff of 
Sinclair User. We apologise 



to Bruce Everiss for any in- 
convenience and embarrass- 
ment caused. 

I HAVE just read the Hit 
Squad interview with Den- 
ton Designs July 1985. I 
believe the paragraph detail- 
ing programs written by 
Denton Designs to be mis- 
leading. 

In the list of games given 
you include World Series 
Baseball, The Spectrum 
version of the game was not 
written by Denton Designs, 
but by Platinum Produc- 
tions for Imagine '85, which 
is owned by Ocean. 

David Anderson, 

Platinum Productions, 

Kilwinning, Ayrshire 

Rating scores 
no points 

I HAVE always relied on the 
Gilbert factor when buying a 
game. Now I find you have 
changed to star ratings. Gil- 
berts are much better, 
please bring them back. 

As to David J Anderson's 
totally despicable letter 
against women reviewing 
games — May 1985. Your 
interviews have not been 
'scraping the barrel' 
although I would like to see 
an ACG interview. 

Max Schaefer, 
London SVV11 

Take up thy 
C5 and run 

LET US hope your com- 
ments - Adventure, July - 
concerning the copyright 
hassles that Delta 4 hope to 
avoid by 'changing the 
names and aims' in their 
game Bored of the Rings 
are well founded, 

I feel sure that some of the 
Harvard Lampoon team 
which published the original 
Bored of the Rings might 



recognise the work as a copy 
of their own, 

I look forward to being 
informed that (a) it is all 
Delta 4's work^and coinci- 
dences do happen; (b) it was 
an oversight and they 
thought the book would be 
mentioned: (c) you enjoyed 
reading the book; or (d) who 
cares what the yanks think 
and I can take a running 
jump. 

P J Bird, 
Northfield, 
Birmingham 
# The correct answer is (d). 
The game is a spoof of Tol- 
kein's Lord of the Rings with 
all names and places changed 
and not a copy of the Amer- 
ican book. Apparently, the 
title is not copyright. 

Lampooning 
a copyright 

I WOULD like to reply to J 
Talbot and J Paton - June, 
letters - who criticised my 
earlier letter about the C5. I 
can't believe J Paton staring 
that the lack of cycle paths is 
to blame. You don't build 
an aeroplane and wait for 
someone to build a runway! 
The CS is also too easy to 
steal. All you have to do is 
hop in and off you go. If you 
want a faster getaway then 
try picking it up and run- 
ning with it under your arm. 
Dietmar Osman, 
Farnham, Surrey 



Take two for a 
Tasword count 

I WAS interested in your 
article Customising your 
Word Processor t May, Sinc- 
lair User. 

I attempted to introduce 
into my Tasword the Word 
Count, resulting in a crash- 
ed program. 

Philip Muston, 
Richmond, Surrey 
• THE MOST common 
problem with the Word 
Count routine is once you 
have saved the code to tape 
you should load Tasword, 
add the additional Basic and 
enter CLEAR 31940 as a 
direct command before load- 
ing the word code. To call 
the routine RUN Tasword, 
go m the STOP menu and 
press W. 

To display the word count 
option in the menu, alter lines 
25 to SO. Those vary accord- 
ing to which version you own. 

The header , in listing 4, 
should be put in line 270 with 
the REM removed and the 
REM in line 294 should be 
removed to print the footer. 

In line 220 the FN in the 
second statement is a 
Keyword, reached by going 
into E mode, holding symbol 
shift and pressing 2. For clar- 
ity you could also alter the 
middle of line 200 to read: 
LET a$= "Text Lines per 
Page( f ';PEEK31940rr: 



No peace study bias 



I AM disappointed by two 
things in your June issue 
which seem based on ill- 
considered statements. 

The first was the infer- 
ence by Gremlin that 
Ronald Reagan is about to 
start a nulear war. Surely 
that is too trite. 

More serious was Theo 
Wood's claim about peace 
studies. What is 'unbiased 1 
about teachers wearing 
CND badges while teaching 
the so called peace lessons? 

I am pro Mr Reagan and 
Mrs Thatcher but would not 



seek to dismiss their oppo- 
nents with a couple of off- 
the-cuff remarks. 

Michael J King, 
Bentley Heath, Solihull 
• Theo Wood did not use the 
word * unbiased' and made no 
references to CND badge- 
carrying teachers. She did, 
however, say thai the program 
"is informative without being 
biased. " 

Gremlin made no suck in- 
ference about Reagan's itchy 
trigger finger. Your right-wing 
paranoia is obviously working 
overtime, Ed. 



SINCLAIR USER August I9S5 



11 



-" i - J -ll -■ ■ 



:" 



::: 



" : 






AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT TO ALL QL OWNERS 



bad or changed medium 

Your data is worth a lot to you. Source programs, text, scientific information, records, an 
represent hours of your time and effort. Losing a file could at worst cost you money - and if s 
always infuriating! 

No storage medium is 100% reliable. Thafs why TALENT has developed the CARTRIDGE 
DOCTOR. If s a sophisticated machine code program which will, in most cases, enable you to: 

• recover files from a bad medium 

• recover files which have been accidentally deleted 

• recover files with lost or damaged blocks using the "block patch" utility- 

Ifs very easy to operate and no knowledge of BASIC or machine code is required. 
Can YOU afford to be without the CARTRIDGE DOCTOR? 









Available only from: 



£2 1 .95 

+ 50p postage & packing 

QL is a Registered Trade Mark of Sinclair fiesearch 



*r. 



bvai 



£■ 



LENT 






i! 



COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

Curran Building, 
101 St. James Road, Glasgow C4 ONS 

Tel: 041-5522128 (ACCESS & VISA accepted) 
SOFTWARE FROMSC0TLANO 



I 




IT'S 1985 — THE YEAR 
OF COMMUNICATIONS 



Why buy programmes for your Spectrum when a world of free 

'lelesoftware' is open to you. Discover Prestei, Micronet 800, 

VsBwfax, bulletin boards and open a wtiote new worid. Even usaf to user. 

Everybody's doing il — linking their home computers to gtanl mainframes 

and networking to thousands of other micro users via the phone and a modem. 

A whole new world of mainframe games, electronic mail, free 'telesoftwane'. electronic" 

notice boards, real time conversation, armchair shopping and home-banking will be al 

your fingertips! And at local and cneap rate, phone charges are only around 40p for a whole 

hour's entertainment. 

Spectrum 16V 48k, Spectrum + The VTX 5000 Modem comes complete with all the software 

(in ROM) required to access the world of electronic communications, networks, telesoftware end databases 

(both public and private.] 

(User to user software on cassette £3,95 extra! 

Terminal Emulation Software Package to link to commercial databases and bulletin boards which use ASCII 

format on cassette C6.96. 

The VTX 5000 requires no external power and fits under your Spectrum to become part of the machine. 
Only one lead links your computer to the Dutside world. 

FOR THE SPECTRUM 16K, 46K AND SPECTRUM ■ THE VTX 5000 IS AVAILABLE AT A VERY SPECIAL 

£49.95 inclusive of VAT and P&P for a limited period only. 

SPECIAL, SPECIAL OFFER 

Order your VTX 5000 NOW and get a FREE quarter's subscnrjtion to Mi crones eOOjmdJ/iewfax. 



All modems provide 1 200^5 baud, enabling access to 

Prestei, Micronet 800, BT Gold, Farmlink, Citiservices, 

Hornelink, and some free bulletin boards (some 

databases and networks require a small subscription). 

Fully BT Approved. 

Simply clip the coupon and send it with a 

cheque (payable to Modem House) to: 

MODEM HOUSE 

I o la nth e Drive 

Exeter, 

Devon EX4 9EA 

Tel: (0392)69295 



[Ptease send to me. 
I Spectrum Modem's) £49.95 
• O User to user software £3.95 
□ Terminal £6.95 
' I enclose * 
■ Name— ^^^^^_^^^^^^^_ 



hone. 



I- 

I Telep 

■ Please allow 29 day delivery 
This offer applies only while stocks last. 



12 



SINCLAIR USER August 198$ 



When the body 
can't take it 



THE INFINITE lives poke 
for Fantastic Voyage — 

July 1985 — needs correct- 
ing. Change CLEAR 30791 
to 30719. 

When the body overheats, 
stop the infections with the 
following program. 
10 CLEAR 30719 
20 LOAD 'VOYACiE' 
CODE 

30 POKE 54492,0: REM inf 
lives 

40 POKE 54227,0: REM 
stop infection 
50 BORDER 
60 PRINT USR 53248 

Does anyone know where 
the seventh piece is? 

Timothy Smith, 

Grays, 

Essex 

Getting Gilligan 
down the mine 

I HAVE recently purchased 
Soft Aid which contains 
Gilligan s Gold and find the 
game addictive and enjoy- 
able. If any one is having 
problems* follow these in- 
structions. 

Picking Up 
Position Gilligan in front of 
the object, facing it. Press 
the Action key. Gilligan 
should pick up object. If 
not, try the process again in 
a slightly different position. 
To drop, press the Action 
key. 

Using Pit Bus 
Stand under a black arrow 
when bus route is clear. 
Press Action key and you 
should hang horizontally. 
When pit bus is directly 
under you press the Action 
key. You should drop down 
into the bus. If you miss try 
again. To get off, press left 
or right or if there is a 
ladder, up or down. 

Pushing Wheelbarrow 
Stand, facing the barrow so 
that Gilligan's hand is on the 



handle. Press the Action key 
and push the barrow where 
you like. To drop the bar- 
row, press Action key. 

Richard Newell, 

Shrewsbury, 

Shropshire 

Endless lives 
are bootiful 

HERE ARE some infinite 
lives for Booty. Type in the 
program then load as 
normal. 

10 BORDER 0: PAPER 
0: INK 

20 CLEAR 26870 

30 LOAD "•■ SCREEN! 

40 BORDER 0: PAPER 
0: INK 

50 PRINT AT 19,0: 
LOAD "" CODE 26880 

60 RANDOMIZE USR 
26880 

70 POKE 58294,0 

80 RANDOMIZE USR 
52500 

Darren Hutchinson, 
Pitalpin, Dundee 

Station's role 
in history 

HAVING trouble working 
out some of the anagrams 
and dates in Station? 

In sector one, the first 

anagram is Bible and the 

date h 1968; the second is 

EEC in 1957. The next is 

Diamond and dates from 

1897 and lasdy, Relativity 

with a date of 1905. I hope 

those help you on your way. 

Julian Marshal], 

Abingdon, 

Oxforshire 

Rigging the 
records . . . 

HERE IS the format of the 
62 byte service record and a 
method to create your own 
fake record for those 
wishing to play Psytron on 



all six levels. 

Bytes 1-23 your name; 
Byte 24 header (202); Bytes 
25-60; 36 bytes of score 
information, for each of the 
six levels, five previous 
scores and the average score; 
Bytes 61-62 checksum of 
bytes 25-60. 

The following program 
will create a service record 
of 99 per cent for each level , 
10 FOR N - 33001 TO 
33023 

20 POKE N 3 66 
30 NEXT N 
40 POKE 3302432 
50 FOR N = 33025 TO 
33060 

60 POKE N.99 
70 NEXT N 
80 POKE 33061,236 
90 POKE 33062,13 
100 SAVE 'TAKE" CODE 
33001,62 

Run this program but do 
not start your tape for the 
SAVE until the first bloc — 
Spectrum header — has 
been sent. You now have a 
service record which you 
can load to play at any level . 
Colin and Roger Bennett, 
Madrid, Spain 

Escape from 
the Sidhe . . . 

IF YOU ARE having trou- 
ble getting past Stdhe 
Olcweed and those nasty 
faces in Tir Na Nog, press 
key 6 once you have been 
killed to return to the menu. 
Pressing 1 returns you to 
where you were — you can't 
move straight away but you 
are alive and well. 

Chris McGrail, 
Mosto rough* Sheffield 



Pitch bugged 
on Match Day 

I WOULD like to point out 
some bugs in Ocean's 
Match Day. 

When the ball is kicked 
by a player towards a goal- 
post, it sometimes appears 
to rest against the post and 
neither player can move it. 

If a player scores just on 
half time or full time, the 
clock carries on for 90 mi- 
nutes before the match res- 
tarts and then the clock goes 
haywire and returns to zero. 

Sometimes the players 
can run around with their 
hands in the air after a goal 
even when scored by the 
opposition. 

Steven Knott, 

Stockport, 

Cheshire 

Sick as the 
proverbial . . . 

I CLAIM to be Britain's 
worst Match Day player. I 
got beaten 15-0 on amateur 
the first time I played it. A 
few games later I was beaten 
9-0. I've got better now, but 
my friend beats me every 
time. Robert Looker, 

Eastkigh, 
Hampshire 

Monty champ 
of the world 

I CLAIM to be champion at 
Monty is Innocent. I com- 
pleted it in one minute, 14 
seconds, 

Tony Winterbottom, 

Penzance, 

Cornwall 



Kicking the Ninja 



WHILE PLAYING Bruce 
Lee I noticed a nasty bug 
when Bruce arrives at the 
frame with three boxes — 
one holding the correct 
route, the other, two red 
herrings. If the first box is 
selected, you will be pre- 
sented with a frame that has 
three Levels and two doors. 
It you open the door on the 



lowest level* never kick or 
punch the Ninja so that he 
falls into the doorway. That 
causes the computer to lock 
up. 

My final score is 
1,314,900 with 15 falls re- 
maining. 

Philip Bond, 

Bany, 

South Glamorgan 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



U 



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INTERFACE1 £15 INTERFACE2 £15 

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14 



SINCLAIR USER August I99S 




Spectrum Software Scene 



SINCLAIR USER Classics are prog- 
rams which, in our biased and 
eccentric opinion, set new stan- 
dards in software. They are the 
programs by which the others 
should be measured. If you buy no 



other software, buy these. No self- 
respecting Sinclair user should be 
without them. 

Software reviews carry a star 
rating, the basis of which will be 
value for money. Programming, 
graphics, speed, presentation, 
addictive qualities and the rest are 
taken into account. 



Guide to ratings 

***** 24 carat. Buy it 

**** Value for money 

*** Nothing special 

** Over-priced 

* A rip-off 




ROLAND RAT, Superstar, re- 
nowned for talking the boom off the 
speed of sound t has forgotten to set his 
alarm clock. He is late for his regular 
appearance on TV -AM. 

The sewers in which he lives, with 
buddies Kevin and Errol, are also in- 
habited by mutant wellie boots which 
stomp their way up and down the 
levels, kicking everything out of their 
way. Roland finds that a pain in the 
tail, and arms himself with a rubber 
glue gun, which can be filled with glue 
pots scattered around the levels. The 
glue puts the wellies into a sticky 
situation and he needs gallons of it to 
get to the studio door. 

To open the door and join Nick, 
Anne and Wincey he has to collect 
pieces of glow-in-the-dark material, 
tine bit at a time, and fix it to the door. 
He must then collect the key and fit it 
into the lock for die grand finale. 

To further complicate matters there 
are two sewer levels. If Roland finds a 
downward arrow on the first level he 
ean travel to the underground system. 

The tubes rattle by frequently but 
Roland, unperturbed, walks 



Roland has had no breakfast. He must 
get by on a diet of Big Macs and crisps 
which will boost his energy level . 

The game relies heavily on the play- 
er's identification with Roland, and 
those who are not enamoured with the 
Superstar might find that play can be- 
come monotonous after more than 30 
minutes, although the C5 trundling 
across the top of the screen with the 
other rush hour traffic provides some 
light relief. 

The various screens look deceptive- 
ly similar, and map-making is essen- 
tial if Roland is to avoid running 
around in circles. 

The graphics, while not outstand- 
ing, are smooth and fast. The scroll 
from one room to another is particu- 
larly impressive. 

Roland's Rat Race will be of in- 
terest to rai fans everywhere. 
Although he is not his usual verbal 
his rambling computer 
adventure? give a new^ 
meaning to 




cuteness on the arcade screen 

In the final analysis, is it good fun? 

Yeah! lokn Gilbert 




side of the track avoiding the danger. 
It luck is on his side he will find a 
black door into which the glowing 
pieces of puzzle can be fitted. He must 
be fast, however, as the time ticks 
slowly onward and the show will soon 
be over. 

Finding the pieces is hard work and 



SINCLAIR USER August 198S 



13 



Highway 
Encounter 



THE ORDERLY advance of the 
aliens to destroy civilisation as Slugger 
would like it to be, is given a new twist 
in Highway Encounter from Vortex. 
The aliens stick to the main road, and 
your job is to ferry the lasertron to 
their base where it will obliterate the 
nasties. 

The twist is the combination of 
state-of-the-art Knight Lore graphics 
with straight shoot-'em-up button 
bashing. The lasertron is propelled by 
a chain of five Vortons, dalek-like 
robots with guns in their heads- You 
control one Vorton at a time> but the 





other four will continue to move the 
laser tron forward if they can, and are 
thus vulnerable to attack. It seems 
particularly devious to design a game 
where you can lose your other lives 
before you even get to play them. 

There are 32 screens of 3D highway 
to negotiate, each one containing a 
problem of its own* Some involve 
moving oil -drums around to prepare 
the way for the lasertron, others are 
free-for-all scraps with the aliens. The 
most difficult involve both. 

The aliens have an innocent fury 
about them. Some look like rejects 
from a remake of War of ihe Worlds, 
others resemble psychotic eggs. Vor- 
tex promises staggering effects when 
the lasertron is finally brought to its 
destructive goal. 

In many respects the game is super- 
ior to Knight Lore and Alien 8, in 
that everything moves faster and in a 
true eight directions. There is colour 



in the screens, though not much, and 
most importantly, the action con- 
tinues off-screen so you can't hang 
about for long trying to work out the 
best tactics. Weaknesses^ include less 
variety in the problems, and the lack 
of a maze — the highway is a simple 
straight road, easy to wander along to 
the end, but much more difficult to 
negotiate with the lasertron in tow. 

It is a long time since we last saw a 
Vortex game — TLL and Cyclone 
were the last products. Highway En- 
counter is the best yet, innovative and 
addictive, and should go down a treat 
th is summer , Ckns Boumc 



Publisher Vortex Prk* CT.95 
Memory 48K Joystick Kempsion. 
Sinclair, cursor 

***** 





A PERPETUAL MADcap struggle 
has left the pages of America's top 
cartoon magazine to continue its con- 
flict on the computer screen. 

The comic capers of the two secret 
agents from MAD magazine reappear 
in Beyond's Spy vs Spy. A unique 
split-screen approach allows two to 
play simultaneously. 

Ransacking a foreign embassy, the 
idiotic duo - one white, one black - 
blunder into each other's traps as they 
both search for secret documents and 
a diplomatic bag. 

Hidden in the embassy are five 
objects which must be found before 
escape can be made in a super-slow 
and cranky bi-plane. The rooms all 
look alike so it is not surprising that 
you are constantly running into your 
own traps. 

Buckets of water placed over doors, 
springs which send you hurtling 
across the room, are all part of the fun 
in trying to outwit your opponent. 
Those can be accessed through an 



icon-driven Trapulator and are easy to 
set once you've got the knack. 

The two sleuths constantly cross 
each other's tracks and battle com- 
mences. Clubs magically appear as the 
two take wild swipes at each other. If 
you are lucky enough to score seven 
blows, your opponent ascends to 
heaven on angel's wings. After a short 
breathing space - in which the seconds 
still tick by - he is back for more. 

Each time a confrontation occurs, 
any objects held are lost - either 
hidden in that room or throughout the 
building, It is the winner's privilege to 
search the room and either claim or 
reclaim articles. 

You can play in a six room embassy 
in which the game is quickly over - 
ideal for practising on - or up to a 36 
room layout where the going is slower 



16 




and an element of cunning strategy is 
required. A two player game is more 
fun than playing against the computer 
- mainly because the computer nearly 
always wins. 

Surprisingly, the game is not com- 
patible with a Kempston single-port 
interface and will only take joystick 
interfaces which emulate the 
keyboard. A dual port interface is 
needed for two players and though the 
keyboard can be used, space is 
cramped. 

The instruction book is lengthy, 
though well presented, and it takes a 
while to get the hang of the game. 
Instant play is not possible, but it's 
worth persevering. 

Spy vs Spy will probably be as 
successful as Shadowfire Playing 
against the computer, however, is 
unexciting and frustrating- A two 
player game is another matter - it's 
challenging and there is more fun to 
be had outwitting a friend than a mere 
circuit board. Clan tdgeley 



Publisher Beyond Price £3.96 
Memory 48K Joystick Sinclair, Cursor 
***** 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



Spectrum Software Scene 




THE SODA BAR is as much an 
American institution as blueberry pie 
or Grandma Moses. To judge from 
Tapper, the latest import from US 
Gold, the only character who hates it 
is the guy who serves the soda. 

Your job in Tapper is to keep the 
refreshing fizz flowing as the custom- 
ers queue for more. There are four 
bars, with several layers of play in 
each. First it's the turn of the cow- 
boys, a fairly docile lot. Slide a drink 
along the counter quickly enough and 



boys, you move to a duel of wits with 
the Soda Bandit. He swaps around the 
cans, after shaking all but one. Find 
the untampered can and you win* 
Open one of the others and you get a 
face full of froth. 
Then it's on to the senior prom> 



101150 




NX 




released this year, and its theme is just 
right for the summer, 

Graphics are clear, humorous and 
simple so that its easy to see what's 
going on. Problems can occur if the 
bar gets too crowded, so that two 
people in the same place create a blur. 
For once, that adds to the realism. 

The action is extremely we II- paced 
against the demands of the game. Its 
fast, but not fast enough to be im- 
possible. As usual with US Gold 
products, the choosing of skill levels, 
joystick selection and so on is made 
very friendly. Highly complex arcade- 
adventures are all the rage at present, 
and it is good to see such a fine, 




they'll take it and leave, but if a 
customer waits too long he'll stay 
around for another. 

And that's where the trouble starts, 
Obviously impressed with your skill at 
delivering drinks, the customers tend 
to hurl the empties back at you. One 
mistake - a drink too many served, a 
glass on the floor, or a customer left 
unattended and you lose a life. 

If you manage to satisfy the cow- 



with jocks and their girls crowding the 
marquee. Life gets even more hectic 
when you graduate to a punk bar, 
although the balding bespectacled 
boys look more like fifties college 
wimps. Nice to see the colony still 
retains a touching innocence about 
British mores. 

The final sequence involves aliens, 
just as eager for a slow Sarsparilla as 
anybody else. A lovely touch is the 
occasional appearance of a tip. Collect 
the lip and a pair of dancing girls 
perform on stage. That can be a 
blessing, as heads will turn and cus- 
tomers stop bothering you for a while. 
But serve a drink and they won't 
notice — so you have to be careful. 

Tapper is simply delightful to play. 
It's surely the most addictive game 




unpretentious classic arcade game re- 
leased. If your brain has been com- 
pletely drained by the mysteries of 
Shadowfire or Gyron of late, take a 
trip to the soda fountain. It's a re- 
freshing experience. Chm Bourn* 



Publisher US Gold Pnce i 7 95 
Memory 48K Joystick Kempston. 
Sinclair, cursor 
***** 



Jet Set Willy II 

IT IS EIGHT months late, and 
Matthew Smith had very little to do 
with it. Nevertheless, it's here, and 
Miner Willy rises from the grave in 
the final pan of the Manic Miner 
trilogy, 
If you can clear the clouds of 




nostalgia for a moment and look at the 
game objectively, it also seems to be 
the rip-off of the year. Jet Set Willy II 
is, in a nutshell, Jet Set Willy with 
about 70 extra screens. 

The plot is the same - Maria the 
housekeeper won't let Willy go to bed 
until he's cleaned up the house. Un- 
fortunately, builders have been to 
work. Rooms are not always where 
they were* 

If you're puzzled by all this, Jet Set 
Willy was the ultimate ladders and 
levels game, launched in 1984 and one 
of the biggest selling games ever. 

This expanded version continues in 
the same vein under the coding of D P 
Rowson, with rooms such as Maria in 
Space and Beam me up Spotty. Games 
attacked include Alien S, and Tribble 
Trouble. 

Jet Set Willy II is probably as tough 



as the original. The Banyan Tree is as 
vile as ever, as is the Wine Cellar. 
C trap hies, which amazed us all at the 
time, now look dated, and the music 
does not improve with age. Movement 
is considerably faster, although the 
infinite death traps, where you cannot 
escape losing all your lives in quick 
succession, have multiplied. 

If you already have Jet Set Willy, 
and have waited for the final game for 
a year, you'll probably be a little 
upset. If you never saw the original, 
then die sequel is the one to buy, and 
represents very fair value for a one- 
time classic. ChmBwrw 



Publisher Software Projects 
Price £6 95 Memory 48K 
Joystick Kempstoo 

** + 



more software on page 20 



CLAIR USER Augwt 1985 



17 




lere at Sega we like to think we 
know a thing or two about quality. 
Our reputation has been forged in the 



Pl<&T[» 1 BSB34 
HI SCQIE Q09?4 
MMJW 1 »■ 



World's most competitive market the 
American arcades. Discerning arcade 
flayers; and they know a thing or two 
as well: have voted our games some o$ 



74 #Wt*t#W tlpn.Oat^l 

rrrrrrr <* m 





innovation as one chart-topper has 
followed another. 

a 



e mighty ape up 
Monkey Mountain in CONGO BON 
number 3 in the Billboard Chart in 
1984. You'll ride hippos, dodge 
charging rhinos and do battle with 
jungle creatures: but make sure you 
don't end up as a lunch time treat for 
man eating fish! 

Or you can have a smashing time 
with Bally Midway's UP'N DOWN. 
This is a Frustrated motorists dream: 
you bash your way over rough roads. 




: players 

ied. 



the best of all time. They've enjoyed 
high speed action, breathtaking 
graphics, thrills and spills, variety anc 



But why should the arcade player 
have all the fun we were asked. 
Of course there was no reason at all; 
and so we decided to bring our games 
home and let ail the family have a 
piece of the action. We have rewritten 
the programs for many of the popular 
home computers and oow everyone 
fiomj 



unior to grandma 



can nave a 



gd J 



SPY HUNTER 



TAPPER 



UP N' DOWN 



CONGO BONGO 



ZAXXON** 



BUCK ROGERS 



Commodoie 64 



NOW 



NOW 



NOW 



NOW 



NOW 1 



NOW 



Spectrum 



NOW 



NOW 



SOON 



SOON 



NOW 



NOW 



Am st r ad 



SOON 



SOON 



SOON 



SOON 



SOON 



SOON 




» Fu bluhed by Synaf+c Sofrwufc Coip onlei litencerfroin S*ri EnierprtMi Lid "*«1 veniof. ot ZAXION i vuLi b|e on c jw tc and published by bituaft [qc. undef Ihcekc from 5*g* hairrp wri 



Vuieogmr copyn(J« mi Seft £niejpa>ci Lid. mlir Mtiwtf b i tndimtrk ol ft illj iitdmtf MIr. Co. Ftduge *mi pta^tut copyright 



leap dead ends, canyons and crush 
anyone who gets in the way! No. 1 in 
the Play Meter Conversions Poll. 
UP 'N 1 DOWN is one smash hit that 
really is a smash! 
And if all that doesn't drive you to 
' then TAPPER will! This has got 

:o be the loudest, wackiest saloon bar 
there's ever been. The action gets 
truly out of hand as the overworked 
bar tender scrambles to serve his 
unruly (and very thirsty) customers. 




1»&4 Se|i Bnieipffcci, Lnc. TAPPER and EPYHVNT1R nc tint 



t—r-M- 




■ I 



alien saucers. Your race against death 
has just begunl Prepare for battle with 
your most powerful enemy, . . the 
mother ship. You must hit her dead 
centre -anything less will only waste 
fuel. Aim steady, but hurry. . your fuel 
is dangerously low! 



Work your way through the wild 

Western Saloon to the Sports Bar. 

from there to the slam dancing Punk 

tar and into the Space Bar where the 

customers really are out of this world 1 
Down to earth with SPYHUNTER 
j from Bally Midway. But don't expect 
- my chance of a rest After all. this was 

the number 1 arcade game of 19*4 and And finally there's the legendary 

now you're in the hot-seat of the ZAXXON-the ultimate experience 

deadliest machine on four wheels. You'll pilot a space fighter through 

You re after enemy spies. The situation force-fields and enemy fire on your 
life and death, You'll need eveiy 

weapon you've got - machine guns and 

guided missiles, oil slicks and smoke 
1 sueens But the enemy is everywhere 
I On the road, in the water, even in the 
I air. So you'll have to be more than fast 
f to stay alive in SPYHUNTER: you'll 
I seed brains and guts as well! 
- Fly into the 2 Sth Century and bear 

ihe mantle of the legendary BUCK 
I ROGERS. Skillfully slip through 

deadly electron posts. Dodge and 

mission to do battle with the deadly 
ZAXXON, Countless others have gone 
before; now it's your turn to do battle 
You'll quickly see why ZAXXON is one 
of only ten games that have made it 





We're bringing all this action home 

to you; and now under the U.S. Gold 
label you'll find versions lor the 
Spectrum and Amstrad too. With U.S. 
Gold and Sega, the arcade winners, 
you'll be a winner too. Hands down! 




into Elect 
of Fame 



onic Games' American 



Commodore 64 Cassett 
Commodore 64 Disk 
Spectrum 48 K 



rican Hall 

— 

e £9,95 




£12,95 
£7,95 



Man" tact u r«i in th* U . K . bj U .& Go 



■uru o( UUr UidwJif USt Co. VJdrogunt <rapytj(bt tMI 



]*S* Sefci Km«[pi«K« In4 07 N DO&VN a a ujderaarh otSegiJ Bute prae» Lid. manu£*;»jwl uodef llt*M* tipni Stgt & iifip™" -td |ipn 



Hill ? Mbdmf M/f. Cc 411 right* r wrred CONGO BOH GO I* * infjetnut ol6rg» HalcfcrtM*. fee 



1 — X 



Limited Uni| 10, Parkway Industrial Ce nre. 
Htnrage Street. Etii m Ln ph am B74L1 , 



Telephone 



02} WSM1 



Copfrigh 



ifl&l. Si &i BaLcrp Mtk 



Spectrum Software Scene 




Southern Belle 



TAKE YOUR SEATS for the 1 
o'ciock service from London Victoria . 
calling at Clapham Junction } Mer 
tham, Haywards Health and all 
dons to Brighton. The Soutl^M$e(k\ 
the famous Pullman servjMR the 
1920s, is stoking up for a final run 

Hewson Consultaries has a item p 
to capture the trials of life in 
engine cab in a full simulation of 
of the most elegant trains of alt. 
You must control a 4-6-0 King 
Arthur Class locomotive, reg- 
ulating the steam pressure, 
shovelling coal into the 
boiler, obeying signals, 
and even blowing the 
whistle at the cor 
rect times. 

The screen 
display shows 



erior of the cab and the I 
of the track as they pass by. Tl 
include 24 stations, tunnels - in.. I 
ing the twin -towered Clayton tunnel — 
signal boxes, Banersea Power Station, 
and other landmarks. 

Controlling the train is nor easy, in 
spite of a comprehensive booklet in- 
luding a history of the line. Gradients 
are included, and to score full points 
you must make it to Brighton on time, 
using an economical amount of coal, 
fhere are a number of training 




production copy, with many of the 

control features not fully operative. 

Hewson promises further landmarks 

gdes, where the computer controls and decoration on the screen, as well 

y of the functions* and the full run as information about hazards and sig- 

rials. Our rating is therefore provision- 
al and may be updated in a later issue. 
Train lovers will certainly enjoy a 
good, solid simulation, and those who 
are used to flight simulators 

day's outing on the Southern 
refreshing change from 



ides weather hazards. There is a 
-speed demo as well, bm the 
whole trip is in real-time, so 
you will not finish in under 
Wn hour. 

The version we 

was a pre- reir 



BICUISM 




SOME simulations are fun, others can 
be downright boring. Juggernaut fits 
snuggly into the second category with 



■ *n» 



».«.« — < 



%e& 



<■ mi mini n mutt milium 



''iimiiimiiiiiik. 



><i til mi mil m ir> 



''■■>■ ■ 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 



a trip around town in a container 
lorry, trying to pick up cargo. 

The loads include fruit, veg, timber 
and coal of which you must take 
enough to meet targets set by your 
manager. 

Your trip starts at a depot picked at 
random and shown on your map as a 
flashing square, Putting the truck into 
first gear and pressing down the 
accelerator will give forward move- 
ment. Moving too fast may take you 
into a wall, or through the trees. 

The first move should be to find a 
telephone and make a call using the 
main icon- driven option. A map 
appears and you are totd where your 
cargo may be picked up. To load cargo 
you must back into the docking bay 
and press the load icon. 

Although the simulation bears some 
resemblance to real life — you may 



end up with a feeling of road fatigue 
— the graphics are minimal and the 
action slow. No wonder CRL did not 
put any other cars on the road. With 
their way of handling interrupts on the 
Spectrum the action would come to an 
abrupt halt. 

As it is, the truck floats along the 
lonely road bearing a striking resembl- 
ance to a Gillette Gil razor. If that is 
vector scan graphics you can keep 
them. 

A lot more thought could have 
made it an original simulation. At 
present it is just a bad simulation of a 
sim u la tion . joht Gilbert 



Publisher CRL Pries £9 95 
Memory 4QK Joystick Kempston. 
Sinclair, cursor 

*** 





more tft/noare on page 22 



20 



SINCLAIR USER Augmi 198$ 



y&$tifr 



. . % 5eeutg%i>e!ieving 




This It the aaUBXBB 1=1 apoiiess 
Ltf clean co*p*r t«en I dJlHingLy 
piintld yhitt. IM,E,U) 
I cm sIeo sit j~ 
HE&lOtMS CflBINST 

Si ve ■ * uour command. 
INUE 

I have with *l*:- .,,__, 

LflBSt (JESCTFlOLE STRFI INER ( H O r n 1 
PORTHSLC URGUUH CLESHEfi 



I'M 



ready for your instructions. 




SUBSUNK Adventure with Graphics 

Trapped on the sea bed in a scuppered submarine 



SHORTS FUSE Arcade/Strategy 

Sam Short secret agent versus Boris and his bombs 



1 1 ♦ t 



^m&~J 



5 ~ 




DONT PANIC Arcarie/Strategy 

Amusing and challenging, a game with a difference 



DONT BUY THIS! Compilation 

Five of the worst games you have ever seen 



FIREBIRD SILVER CATALOGUE 

SPECTRUM 16K/48K 
006 RUN BABY RUN Arcade 

Multi -car cop chase and shoot- out 
035 DONT PANIC Arcade/Strategy 

Amgsjung and challenging, a gam* with a difference 

SPECTRUM 4SK, 
008 VIKING RAIDERS War Game 

A lesl of strategy against the computer or friends 
012 THE WILD BUNCH Strategy/Adventure 

Accused o! murder Hunt the real killer 
On MR FREEZE Arcade/ Strategy 

Six compartments, each tougher to de-ice 



016 BOOTY Arca.de/Adventufe 

Twenty holds full of pirate loot 
oat SUBSUNK Adventure with Graphics 

Trapped on the sea bed in a scuppered submarine 
033 THE HELM Adventure 

An amusing, stylish text ad venture 

036 SHORTS FUSE Arcade/ Strategy 
Sam Short secret agenl versus Boris and his bombs 

037 HEUCHOPPER Arcade 
Fast and smootti multi -screen action 

040 DONT BUY THIS Compilation 

Five of the worst but funniest games you have ever seen 
043 FAHRENHETT 3000 Arcade/Strategy 

Sixty tour screens to meltdown 





MAILORDER 

Please state name of game {and machine} and 
numbers required Enclose crossed cheque/PO 
made payable to FIREBIRD SOFTWARE All offers 
are subject to availability Orders are despatched 
promptly All prices inclusive of VAT and postage 

MAIL ORDER: 'FREEPQST FIREBIRD, 
WELLINGTON HOUSE, 
UPPER ST, MARTIN'S LANE, 

LONDON WC2H 9BR 

RretiB-d *nd Bib FnitHflJ logo an tr wJwnalii of Brttah T^Hcommurwcatofli (He 



FIREBIRD SOFTWARE, WELLINGTON HOUSE, UPPER ST MARTIN'S LANE. LONDON WC2H 9DL, TEL: 01-379 6755/S626 



Spectrum Software Scene 



Cluedo 



MURDER is the only illegal move you 
are allowed to make in Cluedo, the 
authorised computer version of Wad- 
dington's board game. 

As a firm believer in cheating, 
Leisure Genius left me smarting. 
What fun is Cluedo if you cannot hide 
the identities of your clue cards or 
make suggestions about locations 
which you hold in your handr 1 

Cluedo closely follows the original 
board game, using exceptional 
graphics to depict the board and the 
3D dice which roll over it, When a 
player enters a room and makes a clue 



p ] l^j 






u 



t*tm 



Quackshot 



SLITHERING snakes and clockwork 
yellow ducks are your enemies in 
Quackshot. 

Your task is to keep everything 
quiet in the Acme Clockwork Toy 
Factory. But as you hear strange 
noises and start to investigate, you are 
pursued by giant ducks and green 
snakes and other wacky wind-ups. 
The only way to escape is to destroy 



suggestion a view of that room 
appears. The switch between displays 
is incredibly fast and expertly done. 

Once chosen, the characters are 
assigned clue cards which depict loca- 
tions, suspects and weapons. One card 
from each of those catagories is chosen 
by the computer to form the situation 
for the murder. The characters must 
then move around the locations asking 
whether other players have particular 
cards which, once seen, can he elimin- 
ated from their enquiries. 

Movement and suggestion phases 
form the main part of the game and 
the speed at which those cycles take 
place can be controlled at the start. 

The sound effects slow down play 
considerably. They introduce players 
onto the screen as their turns roll 
around. Music includes Onward 
Christian Soldiers for the Rev Green, 
Air on a G String for Mrs White and 
Land of Hope and Glory for Mrs 
Peacock. 

The grand denouement can come 
when a player makes an accusation, It 
is a one-time-affair for that player and 
it is done using three menus from 
which the choice is selected. If wrong. 




the clockworks with your stun gun 
and duckbuster bombs. 

You have a time limit on each stage, 
collecting keys and bonuses to trans- 









the player faces expulsion from the 
game. The computer can then either 
take over the play of the loser's cards, 
the player can keep them but not 
participate, or the game can be ended. 

The big advantage that computer 
Cluedo has over the board game is 
that you can play against the computer 
at any time. You do not need a full 
complement of friends. 

The Spectrum is certainly not a 
good competitor for all its large mem- 
ory and logical powers, Cluedo is, 
therefore, best played with a number 
of human and a few computer partici- 
pants. John (JUbert 



Publisher Leisure Genius Price C9.95 

Memory 48 K 

*** 



port you to the next phase of your 
mission and add to your score. 

You fcave to negotiate the maze of 
corridors, which are obstructed by 
toys or dead ends. There are 16 
screens for you to pass. 

The graphics are smooth and as 
basic as any other maze game. It is 
reasonably priced if you like this sort 
of run-of-the- mill game . Narisah Ftm 



Publisher Creative Sparks 
Price £2.50 Memory 48K 
Joystick Kernpstan, Sinclair 
*** 



The Covenant 



ANY CONNECTION between The 
Covenant, biblical events and good 
games is totally coincidental. 

You must guide your space ship 
around the caverns, getting out to pick 
up objects and pieces of covenant 
which, once fitted together, will save 
the world from destruction. There is, 
however, the little problem of the 
Thingies. They have a sting in their 
tails which will terminate you in- 
stantly. 

To destroy the Thingies you must 



leave your craft, pick up some anaes- 
thetic and hit one of the two creatures. 
It will then be disabled for a few 
seconds. Then jump back into the 
spacecraft and bounce on it to pick it 
up. Such complex action makes leng- 
thy play impossible. 

The Thingies are intelligent and 
attack as soon as you leave your craft, 
draining your energy. Getting to Lhe 




energiser is difficult and once there 
the Thingies continue their attack. 

In the second section you must pass 
pipes which drip molten lava. There 
are more Thingies to kill, more 
covenant to pick up and more sections 
through which to pass, 

Arcade wizards would find it diffi- 
cult to complete 256 caverns, go 
through 67 passages and contend with 
ever-present aliens using just one life. 

John Gilbert 



Publisher PSS Pries Cfi 95 

Memory 4©K 

Joystick Kenripstors, Sinclair, Cursor 

** 



mirrt sQfnomt m page 24 



U AIR USER August; 




Name..... 
Address. 



...... 1 1 ■ 



sue 



,„„... „, SPECTRUM ON/OFF SWITCHES 

@ £4.95 each to suit (please ti ck) £.. 

SpectrumlZ^l Spectrum +1 1 

* " ' ... DATA 8INDERS @ £5.95 each £. 

« ■«>» * p Mv computer is a„ .,....., 

- ■"■* ***" ' All prices include post & packing. 

Please make cheques payable to TEC Publications, 24 Victoria Rd, Brc-msgrove, Worcs. B61 ODW. 



Dealer Enquiries Welcome Tel (0527) 74567 



SPECIA 
OFFER- b 

ONLY £3.95 




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your hands on the best 
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"A novel tdta which has been well executed by Melbourne House. A lot of 
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should be vvrthou ir' - Sinclair Liner 

Srt to became the definitive handbook on Micronet tor Spectrum owners. " 

-Micro*** BOO 

"Qtcasicmjiiy one conies across a book which is the oefimtjwe source lor all 
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should be wrthout one" — K*lth Rose, Mod*m Houm 



lo take advantage of the great offff . 
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E6 9S I enclose a (fteojje for £3 95 made i&ayaWe to MODEM HOUSE 

Name — — - ~-~ — ■ ■ 



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SUi 



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SPECTRUM 



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FranKW fines To HoltyTfOOO 

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Animated Sirip Polcet ' , 

Raeky Horror Show . 

Formula One 

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Oambuaters Coming Soon' 

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Flight Pull 737 

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RAM Turbo Interface* 



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Pf-E^SE Kprt U-' rpun ORDER EXCEEDS tso fOt> G£T W\ FURTHER DiSCQUHT 
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S I \CL AIR USER A ugutl / 985 



23 



Spectrum Software Scene 




LUNAR adventure awaits anyone 
brave enough to accompany the in- 
famous Sloanc Ranger, Charlemagne 
Fotheringham-G runes, on his mission 
to save the earth. 

Odin's Nodes of Yesod is startling - 
ly similar in theme to Quicksilva's 
Bugaboo but there the similarity 
ends. 

You play the part of the intrepid 
Charlie who has to- search the caverns 
of the moon for a monolith, which 
scientists believe is used to transmit 
coded messages through space. 






•OT 






[□ os ail 



On docking, your best bet is to find 
a friendly mole who will be of con- 
siderable help later on in the game. 
Moles are able to gnaw through some 
cavern walls, opening up larger areas 
for exploration. For some unknown 
reason, Charlie keeps the mole in the 
helmet of his space suit. 

Dropping through one of the many 
craters, Charlie descends to a world 
inhabited by many wonderful alien 
types. Fish swim quite happily in zero 
gravity, firebirds and walking limes 
stalk the cavern floors — all of which 
will send you reeling. Dancing teddy- 
bears decrease your energy, but the 
mole can be sent to kill [hem. 

Dressed in a space suit, Charlie is 
able to somersault from platform to 
platform as he makes his way through 
the caverns. The graphic detail is 
excellent. 

Eight alehiems — unidentifiable 
objects — must be picked up if you 
are to find the monolith which is 
cunningly hidden. 

A grid at the bottom of the screen 
keeps count of ale h terns collected, 
energy levels and has a real time clock. 
If your energy gets too low you may 



ttfftfffttlft 



have to sit down for a rest. 

One alien in a red pressure sun 
must be avoided at all costs — he 
cannot be killed. As soon as you have 
found an alchiem he will be along to 
steal it. 

Control of movement when switch- 
ing from Charlie to the mole is simple 
and animation is smooth — except 
when two bears land on the same spot, 
when they flicker wildly. 

The game more than makes up for 
the reams of waffling prose, spelling 
mistakes and lack of story on the 
cassette inlay. What are Rhodenden- 
drons anyway? Despite that, Nodes of 
Yesod is definitely worth adding to 
your 1 ibrary of games , Clare tTijpfijt 



Publisher Odin Price C9 95 
Memory 48 K Joystick Kempston, 

cursor, Sinclair 



Go to Hell 



BAD TASTE carried to extremes is 
the concept of the first release from 
Triple Six, an ominous name if ever 
there was one. 

Hell is a 50 screen maze, garish and 
full of cute little animated scenes of 
torture. Heads explode in gouts of red 
as spikes crush them. Bodies are 
stretched on racks, decaying faces are 
sawn into pieces. 

The walls are composed of the 
bodies of the damned, or fiery pits, 
and the whole vile picture is set 



against a background of sound which 
can best be described as a sinister 
squelching, like somebody walking in 
squeaky shoes over pieces of raw liver. 
The game is difficult and addictive, 
but there are no great ideas and 
programming involved. Spiders pur- 




sue you with webs, and other nasties 
hurl missiles at you. 

The quest involves finding seven 
giant crucifixes culminating in a 
friendly chat with Beelzebub* For all 
their horror, the graphics are very 
much based on the UDG format, with 
a certain amount of flicker. 

Buy it for the sicko humour rather 
than the game, and you'll not be 
disappointed. 

Chris Bourne 



Publisher 666 Price £6.99 
Memory 48K Joystick Sinclair, 
Kempston, cursor 
**+ 



Super Pipeline II 



THE TASK is hardly run of the mill 
and graphics hardly sophisticated in 
this drain of a game from Taskset. 

Your objective is to keep the pipe- 
line open. No holes or gaps must 
appear in it and it would be more than 
your job is worth if water escaped and 
did not run into the barrels below the 
pipe. 

As foreman Fred you have {WO 



helpers who will hammer any hole 
closed. But first you must collect them 
and lead them to the leak. Obstacles 
include evil insects, intent on chewing 
you to death, and various power tools 
which have wills of their own. 

Despite the awful graphics the play- 



24 




er will also be disappointed with the 
payability of the game — worse than 
the original arcade version. The 
graphics could have been at least as 
colourful, even allowing for the Spec- 
trum screen restrictions. 

Super Pipeline II is like Jaws //, all 
packaging and no bite. 

John Gilbert 



Publisher Taskset Price £7 95 

Memory 48K 

**# 



more wfmmc tm pugv 26 



SINCLAIR USER Augtui 19SS 



At last! Watson on Assembly. 
The complete course for beginners 




The step by step text in this latest of the well-known "Dr. 
Watson' books introduces the complete beginner to Z80 
programming. By the end of the course every Z80 class of 
instruction has been explained in detail. There are numerous 
examples and exercises throughout the book which ends by 
showing how to integrate BASIC. The series of 'Dr. Watson' 
Assembly courses, of which (this ts the 9th, has been | praised 
by many reviewers for its clarity and comprehensive coverage 
of the subject. The complete 250 page course is t as usual, 
accompanied by an assembler with tutorials for hexadecimal 
and BCD, on tape. 



The complete ZBO assembler 

includes:— 

Symbolic labels 

Hard copy 
•Assembler directions 

Insert/Delete 



•A tutor to help with 
hexadecimal notation is 
included 

■ A full Assembler is supplied 
with each course- 



Send cash with order (post free) to: 



Glentop Publishers Lid, Freeposl, Barnet, Herts, or ring 01-441 4130 to place an order via Access. 



THE SWITCH 

THE ORIGINAL AND THE BEST IN A NEW 
IMPROVED VERSION FOR THE SPECTRUM 
AND SPECTRUM + 



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ON LED 




0708-852647 



+ Avoids coatfy 
repairs 

* Sa v« s wear 
on power plug 

* Simple just 
plugs into 
the power socket 

* RESET SUTTON 
ON/OFF 
Allows you to 
Change peripherals 
without unplugging 

* Compatible wllh 
al add one 

Delivery Promise 
Delivery within 10 days 
or your money back 



EIDERSOFT THE OFFICE HALL FARM 
ISLOCKENDON UPMINSTER ESSEX RM14 3QH 

Please rush me , Switches @ £4.95 

Please add 50p P&P PER ORDER 

I enclose a cheque/PO for £ 



Now available at selected deafers 



ft MR STAR QUALITY 
M flown to earth prices. 



■AfKermi r. ryrp.44 i* 
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; 



SINCLAIR USER Augusi 1985 



25 



Spectrum Software Scene 



Tales of the 
Arabian Nights 




"LORD of the silken bowstring," said 
Scheherazade, "I'm sick of telling 
stories. Let's play a computer game 
instead." And so the great Sultan 
plugged in his gold-plated Spectrum. 

"Aha!" quoth the Sultan. "Tis a 
tale of the rogue Imrahil and his quest 
to rescue Anitra from the evil 
Saladin," 

And so the mighty Sultan settled 
down and began to guide the pale, 
flickering Imrahil about the screen of 
his bejewelled Sony. 

"See my lord," murmured 
Scheherazade, "here is the ship of 
Sinbad, full of gold- Each bag is 
marked with a letter, and the letters 
spell out the sigil ARABIAN. Collect 



the gold and enrich thyself with points 
beyond measure." 

But the Sultan grew angry, for he 
found it most difficult to spell Ara- 
bian. There were three As in it, and 
which was which, and what was what, 
and why? Lives did he lose as the 
night progressed, jumping from deck 
to deck and mast to mast, avoiding the 
hazards of Sinbad's ship. And the 
couscous sat heavy on his bowels. 

Then Scheherazade of the nimble 
wrist took the diamante joystick and 
showed her master how to negotiate 
the first screen, and then it was 
straight down the river by raft to the 
caverns of Al-Khemizd. 

"More gold!" roared the Sultan, 
and straightway began collecting the 
bags again. Meanwhile Scheherazade 
tiptoed out to play much more excit- 
ing state-of-the-art stuff with her 
friends in the village, and was never 



called upon to serve the Sultan again. 
Which teaches us, O children of the 
desert, that even the simplest of level 
and Ladders games may provide a few 
hours of escape from the rigours of the 
h are m , Ckns Bounx 




Psychedelia 




HEY MAN, this is really far out. It's 
so far out I can't see the point of it. 

The latest craze from Llamasoft is 
called Psychedelia. The author de- 
scribes it as a computer toy. 

You could hardly call Psychedelia a 
game. All it does is create random, 
pretty, patterns which you can prog- 
ram and save onto tape. Pressing keys 
on the keyboard will have one of three 
effects. You can either change the 
characters which make up the pat- 
terns, change their colours or the 
overall flow of the patterns. 

If you want to produce your own 
patterns the program presents you 



with one cursor block on the screen. 
You can change the block into one of 
the pre-defined character shapes, set 
the visual synthesiser to record mode 
and press the keys to control the 
direction of the whirls, lines, circles 
and diamonds. 

Llamasoft has launched the product 



■•:r, 



■ a 


■■■■■■ 



111. 



into the wrong market. Instead of 
being on the shelves of high street 
shops it should be running advertising 
matter in [heir windows, The program 
does allow text to be run with [he 
graphics, so the product would be 
ideal for visual advertising. 

The light synthesiser is an interest- 
ing idea, probably generated because 
Jeff Minter of Llamasoft had run out 
of things to do with camels, goats and 
llamas. It is the sort of activity which 
could make you go blind — or mad. 
You would certainly be mad to buy it . 

John (iilberi 




Frankenstein 
2000 




" PERFORM revolutionary micro- 
surgery during this fantasy journey 




through the long lost monsters body. 
Deposit the secret formula from your 
especially equipped micro submarine 
in the bionic implants scattered 
throughout the body's organs." 

Thus reads the ungrammatical 
blurb on the cassette inlay of Franken- 
stein 2000. Sounds familiar? Don't be 
fooled. This game bears as much 
resemblance to Quicksilva's Fantastic 
Voyage as it does to entertainment. 

In the trachea your sub has to avoid 
the hopping frogs; in the Jungs you do 
battle with cigarette packets. Lurking 
in the stomach are undigested fried 
eggs and greasy bacon. What a hoot. 

Your rapidly diminishing oxygen 
supply can he replenished by a brief 



shoot 'em -up after every two organs, 
in which you fire at rampaging oxygen 
molecules. Damage to your craft can 
only be repaired by locating spanners. 

The graphics are large, coloured 
and uninspired. Arcade nulii will find 
most screens a doddle, but the infan- 
tile humour will defeat them 

As a budget game it would be 
average. As it is, almost any other 
game at the same price is better value 
for money. Fantastic Voyage certain- 
ly is. H fit Scotoma 



Mem 




morn software on page IS 



SINCLAIR USER August I 






LIVE OUT YOUR DRE AMS 

ON THE 






Journey back to the 1930s and the glorious days of 
steam aboard the footplate of the powerful King 
Arthur Cfass 4-6-0. 

You can a [most fee! the heat from the firebox and smell 
the billowing smoke when you thunder along the 
famous London to Brighton run. 
Using the footplate controls and gauges you wifl tow 
the Pullman carriages from Victoria to Brighton in 60 
minutes. Any delays will ruin your timetable, so keep 
an eye on your stocks of water and coal - you can 
check the efficiency of your coal bum by the density of 
the smoke. Your present speed, time and the position 
of the next signal for guidance are also displayed. 
y/ipe the soot from your eyes and peer out of the cab 
to pick out the 24 stations as they rush by, Look out for 
other well known landmarks such as Battersea Power 



Station and the Clayton Tunnel. 

Take the option as the driver with your Spectrum 

guiding you along the right track, or try harder levels 

where you are the driver and the fireman, perhaps 

faong adverse conditions that could make you 

disastrously late J 

Realistic controls such as the regulator controlling the 

flow of steam to the cylinders, the damper controlling 

a'\F flow to the Hre, vacuum brakes and the fire doors, 

plus authentic moving graphics and sound, make 

Southern Belle second only to the real experience. 

You have steam up, there's a strict timetable, the 

Southern Belle is all ydurs 

Now that was the age of the train I 

For air 48K ZX Spectrum*. Price £7.95 




to 



lor 






Technician Tad 

Arcade Advrr*u« 

Fgr an 48K SptUfurn* IS.+S 

and Amstrad CPC *64 »i.« 



HEvoon conMJLuna 



560 Milton Trading Esw« . MlSoaAbtntjdon, OKW, OX 1 4 4RX 

For mail order send cheque/pastal order made payable to 

Hewson Consultants For credit card sales state your Access/ 

Barclaywrd number and enclose a specimen signature. 

Don t forget to include your own name and address. 





Drafonton 

L rviTig M**« Mow 

f or a»H8K Spcttnjmi IT.fS 

and Amarad CPC +6* ft. W 



HMthnwtnWAtikHul 

SMttuUuan 

For all +R* Spectrum* if .K 

and AflWMd CPC *** I7.W 



Ai part of dot comrmng deiwtaonwnLof Innovatlw M*T*w* we are afways happy to rvaJuat? software sent to us. with a www to puMfcanon. 




Spectrum Software Scene 



The Bulge 



THE BULGE has nothing to do with 
eating too much paella on your sum- 
mer hols, It's all about war, as you'd 
expect from Lothlorien, and it's set in 
the Christmas of 1944, when the snow 
was deep all over Belgium and the 
Allies storming towards Berlin. 

The Battle of the Bulge was Hitler's 
response to the rapid success achieved 




by the allies after the initial D-Day 
landings. The plan was to blitzkrieg 
through the American Lines, capture 
Antwerp, and split the allies in two, 

Lothlorien's game, marketed under 
a new deal by Argus, simulates the 
campaign from either point of view, 
depending on your tastes. You can 
also piay with a friend rather than 
against the computer. 

There are two main displays, a 
'global' one which shows the entire 
disposition of forces, and the battle 
map, a large scrolling area where 
orders are given and units moved . The 
essence of the game is to set appropri- 
ate long range objectives for main 
units and then adjust to send rein- 
forcements to particular areas. 

Terrain and weather are taken into 
account, and everything is real-time, 
which leaves room for little error. The 
Germans must punch through as fast 
as they can, while the allies must 
bolster the tattered lines. 



The display is clear, if not particu- 
larly artistic, with UDG-style terrain 
and units. Movement is by positioning 
a cursor, and then pressing SPACE. 
Information is given on the unit's 
status and then you can issue orders to 
move it. 

The Bulge begs comparison with 
the excellent Arnhem from CCS. The 
game is not quite so friendly to play, 
but gives as good a feet for the 
problems of the campaign. It might be 
improved with better sound effects, 
and clearer indications of when pieces 
have been moved or not, as it is 
possible to cancel an order without 
realising it. 

That said, The Bulge is a good hard 
fight. It is fast and accurate, and a 
welcome addition to the new breed of 
computer wargames. Ckm Boume 



Publisher LothltMWt Fife* £9.99 
Mamory 48K Joystick Kwnpstwi 







LET'S DO the Time Warp again and 
enter the mansion of Dr Frank V 
Furter, 

So here's the plot. Your beloved 
Janet, or Brad — depending on 
whether you're male, female, or just 
don't care — has been pushed into the 
Medusa machine, the evil doctor's 
ready-made cement mixer. Your job is 
to find the 15 missing pieces of the 
De- Medusa machine. 

The bits are scattered in a few 
rooms around the two storey mansion 
and you can pick only one at a time. 
You then carry it onto the stage and fit 
it into the machine's flashing frame. 



The rooms contain laser beams, yin 
and yang symbols, magic mushrooms 
and hypodermic syringes, so be care- 
ful. You will also have weird charac- 
ters with which to contend. 

There's Riff Raff, the manic de- 
pressive butler who serves electrifying 
experiences. Magenta will take off all 
your clothes. Is that the ultimate 
computer experience or a cheap thrill? 

The other characters include a 
groupie, Columbia; Rocky Horror, a 
Furter creation who appears in odd 
places; and biker Eddie, whose bag is 
deep freezes. 

Some characters will kill you im- 
mediately while others have comments 
to make about life and death. 

The animation has not been hand- 
led as well as it could have been. If 
several characters are moving on- 




screen the action is slowed down. 

If you enjoyed the film and want to 
play a better than average take-off 
then CRL will be in your favour. I 
found k weirdly addictive . John Gtibtrt 



Publish* CRL Prie«C8-9$ 


MsxirtWy 48ft Joystick Kcmpstcin. 


Protek, Sinclair 


### 




PROFESSOR Indiana Smith is no 
relation of the famous Spielberg 
archaeologist but he does get into the 
same sort of trouble. 

His exploits are featured in a trilogy 
of games under the tide Saimazoom. 
He starts his adventures in a jungle, 
probably 'somewhere in Africa', 
where he is after some rare and exotic 
specimens. Some archaeologist! He 
does not know what he is after or what 



his finds are until he gets them back to 
base camp and he has no map- 

Luckily , he can pick up guns, axes 
and canoes scattered around the place. 
There are 100 square screens, or 
miles, to be travelled within the game 
and the journey involves river cros- 
sings, monster attacks, and even a 



28 




spot of GBH on local jungle shrines. 

You can get to the shrines using 
keys which you have found. Just 
insert one into a lock and you will be 
teleported to another location. 

The unlikely scenario, ease of play 
and wimp monsters make the game 
suitable only for those who have not 
touched a computer or laid eyes on an 
arcade game . John Gilbert 



Ptsfa lsh sr Sihwsoft Pries £7,96 
■■sirajry 48K Joystick Kwnpston. 
Sinclair 

#*# 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



* 







"YOU MUST BE THE BEST 
SOFTWARE FIRM IN THE WORLD" 



(L. Hallard, London) 



FOREIGN ORDERS WELCOME, satisfied customers in 63 countries over 3 years. UK prices include VAT: export prices are the same, plus p&p, 
because of the extra work and risk involved- Pay by sterling cheque, bank draft or postal order. All order* must be prepaid: we send your program*, u 
soon 15 we get your money! It's faster to order by phon^ from any country with your VISA, EURO CARD, MASTERCARD or ACCESS, Call Q"l-7B9 8 r »4>> 
24hrs r 7 days a week. WE ALWAYS TRY TO SEND YOUR PROGRAMS ON THE DAY WE GET YOUR ORDER, that's why it's called Speedysott! All 
programs normally in stgck, Faulty tapes replaced immediately. ALL PROGRAMS FOR SPECTRUM AND SPECTRUM +, BIG FREE ILLUSTRATED 
CATALOGUE WITH EVERY ORDER DESCRIBES ALL THE BEST SPECTRUM PROGRAMS, Send £1,00 {refundable) for catalogue only. 



A VIEW TO A KILL 



"A remarkable computer 
, sjm uiation. " iDaiiy Express) 
"Real explain of the world's best secret agent with great graphics and sound." 
fC&VG) VOL ARE IAMES BOND, 007. 3 exdiing arcade adventures hasted on your 
LaieM film, tt talks. Plays your theme. Even Duran Duran play. Realtime; act 
Iwler, get better raiing*! Sticks OK. (DomarlO CASSETTE £10.4S 

YJ\JW YJ l\w\.tW^l t on the Spectrum ... compulsive, 

graphically excellent, an essential purchase. " tPCW) The 'prequef to Tir Ha Nog. 
A more manageable game, made more eventful as the young Cochukainn is 
lomed by 11 brilliantly animated characters. Demo. 9 command keys. No Stick, 
i Gargoyle I CASSETTE £9.« 

OPERATION CARETAKER U£ 

IY STUNNED by the improvement it produced ... almost git the blasted ftrroo 
loaders I could not get lo work went in first time ...an eucnftid purchase." 
iPCWi 2 tap**- l.Head cleanerdemagnetiier. Use every 4 hrs, Z.Azimuth 
alignment l heck tape. Watch the display, adjust your recorder accordingly, (uwl 
prnvidedj Use every 10 hour!.. It worki. (Global! 2 CASSETTES £9.9S 

/^VDOW ^ brilliant fjjmt>, stands in a class of its own." (SUsr) 
Vj 1 IV v*J 1^1 "Stunning graphically ... there is little lo rival it in the 
entire world of Spectrum programs ... utterly original., compulsive" tPCW) WIN 
A PORSCHE 424, TOO! Firebird are ottering a Porsche 9tZ4 tu the lirsl person to 
solve Cyron before 21/KV85. (A lie-breaker may be needed. t Two versions, 
easyish and hardish, on either side o( (his tape. Carries speed controllable. 
Breathtaking graphics. Slicks OK- If irebirrfj CASSETTE £9.95 



BORED OF THE RINGS 



"An excellent 
and vast parody 
. I would father spend months unravelling 'Bored" than days on a self-important 
serious' epic — Challenging and atmospherically written." (PCW) Huge, funny, 
beautifully graphical adventure spoof loads in -l parts. No Stick. (Delta 41 2 
C ViSlTTtS t> HI M DRIVE i AKI*. OM 



SPY 



C nV "At last there m an arcade-type game where skill is 
3T I mure important than good rejciions. " tPCG) FOt t 



V 

OR 2 PLAYERS. 2 CAN PLAY AT ONCE! Both the Slack Spy and I he While Spy 
appear at once on the split-screen and search the rooms, occasionally meeting, 
fighting, planting booby traps. Choose your own skill level and iht? i ompuici Y 
Realtime. A modern classic. Most Sticks excepl Kempsfon. (Beyond) CASSETTE 
£9.95 



World Series BASEBALL 



The screen 
display is 

nothing ihort of brilliant! ... This it a must." (ZXCompi "Tremendous attention 
tt> detail .... the best thing that has ever been released by Imagine." (Crash? 
Classic 3D simulation, with views of the whole pitch and giant video screen at the 
back showing animated close-ups of the action. 1 or 2 players. 3 skill levels. 
Dem«. Slicks OK. (Imagine) CASSETTE £&.« 



C I I fkl I— I /~\ I ICE "* fej ' body snatcher, once it's got a hold on 
rU 1^1 ti\~J%*J Jt you, it will be difficult to throw it off. An 

excellent game. " tYrSp) "An almost oppressive air of evil and (ftttCVOtcrtl r hangs 

over the siene; well -executed, novel, interesting and value lor money t00%." 
(HCW) Basically a wcll-writlen text adventure, with some graphics, The puzzles 
arc all totally new. II is compulsive. No Stick. (Pacific) CASSETTE £4.95 



ARNHEM 



ONE OF THE FINEST COMPUTES WARGAMES M 
HAVE SI- EN. a blend of complex strategy, historical 
authenticity and simple, swift operation which will haw fans returning (or 
mure. " tSIJsr) "Pwjbabfy fhe best wargame on the Spectrum lo date. " lYrSpf tto 
3 players: 5 dilferenl scenarios lasl from under 1 hour to over fl! Good clear 
graphics help. No Stick. iCCS! CASSETTE £B.95 



CAULDRON 



"There's an awful lot to this game and the 
graphics and action are superb, a 

compulsive, graphically tasty little number." (PCtV) "Superb pictorial game 

the graphics are brilliant and colourful ... You will be gelling l»« i'*< client jjmn 
for ibe price (if one." t$LJ$r! The <,td};j>ennf{ly' beautiful Cauldron on oritr ifctt 01 
the tape and a FREE game The EVIL DEAD' on the llipsidt. Can'l be beat, Sticks 
I'alatel DOUBLE CASSETTE £8.00 



The ROCKY HORROR SHOW 

"Looks good, sounds good and is very addictive ... just like the show itself 
(C&VCf "The mansion is an accurate reproduction of the film sets and >r% 
inhabitants are easily recognisable and behave in r hararter. even speaking lines 

that every Rocky fan will know by heart." tPCW) If you love i|, you'll km n 
Slicks Ok (CRL) CASSETTE £fl.9S 



STRIP POKER 



"Even without the strip leature, this game 

would stilt be very compulsive ... the 
scene where the girl removes her dress is very well done ... the movement! are 

alt natural and the effect is quite convincing." (AmUsr) Very we 1 1 -animated game 
of S-card draw poker with some of the biggesl graphics you have ever seen. You 
can raise, stand, fold or bet bul you cannot c heat. Mmdy, modest Mmdy, is your 
opponent.«H£ careful of hpr bluffing. Mind you, she doesn't always blult... NO 
STICK. (Knighlioft) CASSETTE £6.95 



FORMULA ONE 



"Really good strategy game . . . it's 
one ot the best." (PCWl "A rare 
example of a simulation which combines attractive displays, good game 
structure and an exciting theme. " ISUsrj 1 to b players, Full simulation of a Grand 
Prix Racing Season. 16 races. Invest your sponsors' money in drivers, pii-cn-^-s 
cars: guess the weather forecast's accuracy, choose your tym- Then watch ihe 
races run in good, big graphics- STICKS Most.^CWL) CASSETTl £7 <K 



MINI OFFICE 



QUITE EXCEPTIONAL VALUE ..the tint 
atlordabie program suite I have seet\ . I 
strongly recommend beginners get this first. " t'PCNl 4 programs on one tape, alt 
working with EPSON compatible primer., vyordprckessoji: database: 
SPREADSHEET: GRAPHIC'S .An am&iinj; tnll.tfiun a1 an unbdirvable pnte. no 
wonder we've sold so many! NO STICK. {Database) CASSETTE £S.9S 



VISA 
ACCESS 



SPEEDYSOFT 

01-789 S546 (24 HRS) 



EUROCARD 
MASTERCARD 



POST TO: SPEEDYSOFT (SU33) 

87 HOWARD'S LANE, LONDON SW15 6NU, ENGLAND. 

For CATALOGUE ONLY, send £1 cash. Refunded with your first order. 
I own a SPECTRUM. I enclose a cheque/PO payable to SpeedySoft 
OR charge my VISA , ACCE5SyEURQCARD.WSTEKCARD 



No. 



n 



m i i i i i rm 



Signature: Expiry Dale 

Pl*a*e write clearly . I f we can ' I read i t, you won r l get it. 

Namp; 



Name 
Address 



Postcode: 



PHONE NO; if any, mease of query 



Program Name 


Ma 


























Postage* Packing. UKadd75pperorder 

Europe ADD £1.00 per program 

Outside Europe ADD £150 per program 

Total Order 











QL Software Scene = 



MicroAPL 



MICROAPL is a powerful subset of 
APL, a language developed in the 
1960s but .which, because of its spe- 
cialised symbols and use of memory , 
has only recently been translated to 
microcomputers. 

The language is similar to Forth. It 
allows the user to define functions 
which act as stand-alone programs or 
which can be used in other functions. 
MicroAPL is, however, easier to use 
than Forth. You can create variables 
in a similar way to SuperBasic and 
without the hinderance of a stack 
structure. 

Arrays are not allowed within the 
language but you do not need them. 
One variable can contain a matrix, or 
list, of strings or numbers, each sepa- 
rated by a space. For instance 



A is 1 2 3 4 
would put those values into variable 
A. To access just one of the numbers 
you have to use a language construct 
similar to the one which selects a 
character or number from a Super- 
Basic string or array. For instance, 

A<1> 
would print '1' on the screen as it is 
the first number in the A variable 
created above. 

It is possible to automatically set up 
ranges of numbers within variables 
using an index command. 

It is also possible to manipulate 
those numbers using Micro APL r s ex- 
traordinarily powerful numeric oper- 
ators. 

If you want to perform an operation 
on a whole range of numbers it can be 
done with just one command. 

A is 10+5 7 9 12 
will add 10, the number before the + 
operator to 5 } 7, 9 and 12 and so they 



become 15, 17, 19, 22. Those matrix 
operations are performed at great 
speed even when hundreds of values 
are involved. 

The package is also equipped with 
graphics and sound commands, 
although you may have to set up your 
own functions to make them easier to 
handle. 

MicroAPL is an impressive pack- 
age and a pleasure to use. It is ideal 
mainy for use in education and re- 
search which requires the solution of 
complex formulae but it could be used 
in business to calculate profits and tax* 

MicroAPL has done a fine conver- 
sion job for the QL. More power to its 
programming language. Jchn Cj/ ^ 



Publisher MicroAPL, Unit IF. Nine 
Eims Industrial Estate, 87 Kirtltng 
Street. London, SW8 5BP 
Price £99.95 



QC Compiler 



THE QC Compiler from GST does 
not provide a full implementation but 
a hacked -down version called Rat C 
with the addition oflogical, unary and 
assignment operators and comma ex- 
pressions. 

Two microdrive cartridges are in- 
cluded within the package. The first 
contains the compiler, an assembler, 
die Sinclair Linker, a SuperBasic 
program to boot the compiler and a 
clone. The second cartridge includes 
the library routines, an I/O header file 
and an example of C source file. 

One serious omission from the 



package is a screen editor. The in- 
struction booklet states that you will 
have to get one from another source, 
such as Tony Tebby's QL Toolkit 

The compilation process is not as 
friendly as it could be. After typing 
the C source code listing into a file 
editor you must save it and load it 
back into the C compiler which gener- 
ates 68000 source from the C listing. 

You must then save that source and 
load it into an assembler — any 
assembler — which will complete the 
translation into 68000 code. 

There are no grumbles about the 
documentation. The company has 
done its usual better-than-average job. 
The manual is comprehensive but, for 
some odd reason, includes more than 



it should. A few of the example 
programs contain a C instruction 
which cannot be used within the Rat C 
environment. 

The package is disappointing. GST 
is a company which is highly regarded 
by other manufacturers, including 
Sinclair Research, and it should know 
that a good user interface which helps 
beginner and expert alike is impor- 
tant. The core of the product has been 
well put together but a little more time 
could have been spent on window 
dressing, 

John GUbfri 



Publisher GST 
Price £59.95 



r 



Blackjack 



CARRYING on the tradition of 'bring 
out the rubbish first and promise to 
bring out the good stuff later', Quest 
has launched Blackjack. 

The evergreen game, probably that 
Detour because of the mould it has 
attracted as it festered in the vaults of 
software companies, is a simulation of 
casino Blackjack in which you and the 
banker battle it out to get the highest 
value hand or 21 — a Blackjack. That 
is the claim but it is just not true. 

There are certain aspects of the 
game which do not tally with our 




expert understanding of it. For in- 
stance, when the values of your hand 
and that of the computer are equal the 
game gives you your bet back. In the 
version of the game which we know — 
and love — you lose your money 
unless you have an outright win. 



The only selling point for Blackjack 
is the better than average graphics. 
They include a display of the cards 
and the number of chips you have on 
the tabic. The LOADing screen, put 
up two minutes into the game load, 
shows cards and a straight whisky. 

You will probably need the whisky 
if you have just parted with the £20 
needed to purchase the game. There is 
no logical reason for putting the price 
so high. Quest is taking no gamble. 

John Gilbm 



Publisher Quest 
Price £13.95 

* 



mon QL software on page 32 



SINCLAIR USER August 1 9BS 



31 



= QL Software Scene 



MonQL 



WE HAVE received assemblers by the 
bucketful but we have been waiting 
for a good monitor/disassembler to 
arrive. HiSoft has, at last, plugged the 
gap in the market with MonQL, by 
Andrew Pennel. 

Once called from microdrive one, 
using a boot routine, it can either be 
loaded into what HiSoft regards as the 
usual space for machine code prog- 
rams or into the resident procedure 
area. In most cases the latter is more 
protected than the former. 

It is possible to drop out of the 
monitor and back into SuperBasic by 
using CTRL + Q and from there to 
re-enter the program by typing" 
MONQL as a procedure named. 

When it has been loaded MonQL 
displays information about how it was 



entered and gives the Job ID which is 
usually when execution starts from 
SuperBasic. 

A front panel window is set up near 
the middle of the screen. It is split inn* 
two sections. The first contains in- 
formation on the state of some 68008 
registers. The values contained within 
the Program Counter and Status 
register arc shown. 

The flags which have been set 
within the Status Register are also 
displayed. As usual T means Trace bit 
set, U means that the processor is in 
User mode and S means that Super- 
visor mode is in operation. 

Control commands are entered us- 
ing keywords, in a similar way to the 
Spectrum. For instance, J means Job 
Control and Display while Q invokes a 
Quick Disassembly. 

Other monitor functions include 
memory block copy, set Memory 
Pointer, register modify, base conver- 



sion, insert breakpoints, and a series 
of search facilities which can be done 
using byte, word, or long words. The 
function keys have also been set up to 
change the size and position of the 
front panel window. One criticism is 
that the sizes have been set by the 
author, You cannot use cursors to 
extend the window. 

MonQL continues the high stan- 
dard which we have come to expect 
from HiSoft, but the same cannot be 
said about the documentation. The 
manual gives brief details of monitor 
operations and multi-tasking but 
could have been expanded to include 
more examples for beginners. 

Despite that MonQL is a useful 
product and one of the best dis- 
assemblers un the market. John Gilbert 



Publisher Hi Soft 
Price £19.95 
**** 



Land of Havoc 



THE BOX looks great. A hzard man 
fires a gun at a giant scorpion. Inside, 
there are nine glossy postcards with 
maps on them. Even the instruction 
booklet looks like it was done by 
Ultimate. But no . . . instead we've 
got a maze game from Microdeaf 

If that sounds cruel let this be fair 
warning: we intend to be nasty about 
QL software until the quality catches 
up with the price. Land of Havoc is a 
gigantic game, to be sure — 2000 
screens — but the graphics do not 
exactly stretch the machine. 

You have to run around a maze 




collecting various objects on a lengthy 
quest. The first maze has nine sec- 
tions 3 including a desert, village, 
forest and graveyard. To begin with 
you must seek a book in the village, 
then you will be directed to other areas 
for more objects. The postcards fit 
together to form a large map, changed 



each game. After the first stage, you 
move underground, where the maps 
cannot help you. 

The graphics are very large and 
chunky, a sort of magnified Sabre 
Wulf but wholly Jacking in the riotous 
colour and variety of foes of that 
classic maze game. 

It is expensive, which reflects the 
cost of overheads against a small QL 
market, but such excuses mean little 
to the customer. If you require arcade 
action on your QL, then buy it by all 
means, but don't expect miracles of 

programming . Chri t Bourne 



Publisher Mierodeal 
Price £1 9.95 Joyshitk 
*** 



QL Gardener 



PLAN YOUR English country garden 
with the latest really useful gem from 
Sinclair Research. 

To be fair the program provides 
extensive plant and tree databases, but 
how many people in the still small QL 
user base also have green fingers and 
are willing to buy a piece of software 
when books do just as well? At least 
you can easily take a book into the 
garden or to the horticultural centre. 

The master program is a database 
controller into which you can load one 
of the plant libraries supplied with the 



package or one you have ordered from 
an address given in the instructions. 

The plant libraries can be accessed 
to perform a variety of functions. 
They can be used in general garden 
design, to choose specific types of 
plant or for teaching and learning 
purposes, The two libraries included 
in the package are Bushes and Trees, 
and Garden Fluwers. Each is capable 
of storing 600 plant names and details. 

The catagorisation of plants in 1 
eludes type, hardiness, size, growth 
speed, foliage, scent and soil condi- 
tions* You may want to find a plant 
which flowers in summer, will flourish 
in rocky ground and has a purple 
bloom. The program provides a series 



Publisher Sinclair Research 
Price £24.95 

** 



of menus which, hopefully, will lead 
to several plants of the variety you 
require. 

Although the instruction booklet is 
well written it treats the reader as an 
imbecile. A large amount of space is 
filled with the technicalities of using 
the QL, Much of the information is 
repeated within the program. 

It is hard to understand why Sinc- 
lair, which boasts of the power of the 
QL, has launched a product which 
could have run equally well on an 8-bit 
micro. JohtQilbm 



U 



SINCLAIR USER Augmii^S 



SEIKOSHA IMPACT DOT MATRIX PRINTERS 



GP-50A 

Designed for the hobby ( Si 

• Printing speed — 4Qcps 

•5 incti< 46 columns * Friction teed 

• Centronics parallel interface 

• Plain paper— Idw running cost 
GP-SOS — Sinclair compatible 

model 

QP-S5AS — HS-232C •■rial menial.,, 
available toon. 




GP-SOOVC 

Built exclusively for COMMODORE 
VIC-20'C-64 Pergonal Computer ^ 

• Printing speed — 50c ps 

• 10 inch, SO columns 

!eed 
Gft-SOOAT - ATARI compatible 
model 




GP-SOOA 

A new generation of Seiko she 
tow-coat, 10 inch, 80-column 
printer. 

• Printing speed— 5Qcds *Pm 
feed •Centronics parallel 
interface • Low noise level 
3P-5D0AS- RS-232C Uriel 
model 




Here's an 

invitation 

from 







GP-550A 

Features a 2-ln-1 masterpiece- data 
proceulng end correspondence 
quality mode, 

• Dual printing speed— 50cps/ 
25cps • to Inch, 80 columns 

• Various character modes tor 

special effects * Friction and 
pin leed •Centronics parallel 
interface * Optional interface— 
RS232C. POM sol for IBM PC, 





GP-700A 

Superb 7-ccJor graphic printing 

• Printing speed — SOtps 

• Colors specif icable in dot 
units * 10 Inch. SO coiumns 

• 4-color cassette ribbon 

• Friction and pin feed 

• Centronics parallel Interface 

• Optional interface— RGB 
video for IBM PC. RS-232C. 
Apple ll/IIE. 
GP-7QQVC — COMMODORE C-64 compatible 

SP-800/1000 Series 

The optimum partner lor email business, 
educational facilities and more. 

• 80 or 100cps(dralt)/20cps 
(NLQ) • 10 inch, 80 columns 

• Centronics parallel with 
IBM character "Tractor and 
iriction feed "Optional 
intelligent serial interface 
SP-1Q0QA — Centronics parallel 
SP-i000AS — RS-232C serial 
SP-1000AP- APPLE II C MACINTOSH compatible . 

available aeon. 
SP-10MyC-COMMODOflEC-6e/VIC-20 compatible 
,, .available toon 



trtm 



'ive your computer 
system an efficient 
and cost-saving 
printer. 

The GP and SP range 
by Seikosha. From 
dedicated dot matrix 
printers to 

sophisticated models 
incorporating the very 
latest in technology. 




Distributed exclusively by 
DDL and available through all 
leading computer dealers. For 
further details of your nearest 
stockist please phone 
Ascot (0990) 28921 




5 Kings Rkte Park, 
AscotBefkiSLS 8BP 

leiex 846303 OD LJU G. 
THE NEW FORCE IN DISTRIBUTION 








Kfrethe 





Before your eyes your friends, your family are 

rendered helpless, transformed to lesser beings - birds 

and mice - by the invading Kremins, But by a cruel twist of 

fate the transformation leaves you with the body of a bird but 

the brain of a human You are the last 

chance the human race has left. 





Spectrum48K 



Gremlin Graphics. Alpha House, 19 Carver Street, Sheffield S1 4FS. Tel: (0742) 7S34Z3 


















zm 




Jutmny Jones,, modern day hero and explorer 
extraordinaire, has finally discovered the lost Temple of 
Abu Simbel, buile by the great Pharaoh Ramses II over 
3000 ream ago. 

In frenzied desperation he enters this secret world and is 
draun iruo a frightening adventure, threatened by the 
Pharaoh's curse, in constant danger until he can reach the 
inner mortuary chamber. 




SPECTRUM 48K £7.95 



Gremlin Graphks, Alpha House, 10 Cancer Street, Sheffield SI 4FS. TeL (0742) 793423 



_ ii - 







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Mt^PptoPw* 





V, 



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Yeh. it's me, your favourite Superstaun my first supa game! ril 
need ail your help to find my furry friends in the nasty Rodent World where all kinds of monster meanies 
live. Hurry now, and III see you on your screen, from your cuddly, adorable me, Roland Rat. Superstar, 



SPECTRUM 48k 

690 






il 



Otoai House bCcrxr^StFTT-f Harrhciirt M2 5N5 Telephone 06 1 B 33 <* 3 3 Telo«6*?977 

Oosm i*wiTr * **l*ir from vtfcfiwl brmthn o< WOCHJWHTH tt HSMIIII /£' f ^^^S t*SK»S Aumlh-k>-i ««**T 

HMlnx.Jiln nl ill Ijn.i1 -.1*1 -MM'- Hc.ltcr. Iradr CT«»I"^ «*«"» 



QL Hardware World 



Insider information 



POTENTIAL disc users 
with a QL are about to be 
deluged with a range of in- 
terfaces for their machines. 
At least five new ones are 
planned between now and 
September. 

The first of those is the 
Insider, marketed by Silicon 
Express, Having looked at 
the Quest and Micro- 
Peripheral systems, it is a 
refreshing change. 

It works faultlessly with 
an odd collection of 3Vz and 
5 l /4in> 40- and 80- track 
drives — it can also handle 
Bin drives — and, as it uses 



the device name FLP, you 
can swop discs between it 
and a CST system. 

The Insider is, in many 
respects, a budget system. 
The interface PCB fits into 
the port on the left of the 
computer leaving the disc 
connector sticking out. The 
advantage is that it does not 
add much to the overall 
length of the machine but, 
unlike the CST interface, 
there is no plastic cover so 
dust can get in. 

One good feature of the 
interface is that when you 
press Fl or F2 after reset- 



ting it looks to the disc for a 
BOOT file and, if there its no 
disc present , it looks at 
MDV1. Unfortunately, it 
forgets to turn the disc drive 
motor off when that occurs 
and you have to put a disc in 
to stop it. 

The ROM in the interface- 
adds only one extra com- 
mand to SuperBask, FLP_ 
USE. With that you can 
enter FLP_USE MDV and 
the disc drives will respond 
to the device name MDV. 

The only problem you 
might have is when running 
the version LOO Psion soft- 




Board with all the memories 



QL Plus has increased its 
range of add-on memory for 
the QL to include a new 
512K board. Like its other 
boards, 64K 3 128K and 
256K, the 512K board fits 
completely inside the QL 
and takes its power from the 
computer. 

As with all extra memory, 
programs which use it, such 
as the Psion suite, run much 
faster. That is due to the 
processor being able to use 
the memory while the TV 
picture is being sent out. 

Unlike QL Plus's other 
boards, the 512K has two 
problems. They are likely to 
affect any 512K board and 
are the fault of the QL 
rather than the board. 

The board needs a fair 
amount of power to drive it 
and the power available 
from the QL is limited. If 
your power supply is low, 
fitting the board can de- 
grade the display. Of the 
two QLs tried, one running 
on a TV suffered degrada- 
tion while the other, run- 
ning on a monitor, was un- 
affected. A two-way adaptor 
will be needed if you want to 
plug in both RAM and, for 
example, a disc interface. 

The other problem is in 
the way QDOS handles ex- 




tra memory. For some un- 
known reason it treats 5 1 2K 
add-ons differently from 
other siases. That is more a 
problem for software writers 
but one victim is QL Chess , 
which will not run with the 
board fitted. 
If you need the memory 



then the QL Plus board at 
£S16.25 is the cheapest at 
the moment. Its other 
boards, 64K — £86.25, 
128K — £132.25 and 256K 
— £172.50 are also worth 
considering. 

QL Plus will shortly be 
bringing out a second ver- 
sion of its 256K board which 
will have a ROM on the 
board. The ROM will con- 
tain a large portion of the 
Tony Tebby Toolkit includ- 
ing a RAM disc facility and 
will be only £10.00-05.00 
more expensive. 

For further information 
contact PCML Ltd, Royal 
Mills, Esher, Surrey. Tel: 
0372-67282. 



ware from a single drive as 
the programs look for a 
second drive, Silicon Ex- 
press has included a Super- 
Basic program listing in the 
instructions which converts 
all occur ances of MDV2 to 
MDV I, plus the instruction 
to go away for two to three 
hours while it runs. 

For users with the Pony 
Tebby Toolkit the interface 
has all the machine level 
hooks to implement a sector 
read write, — Put and Gel 
etc — plus all the other 
filing. As with many other 
disc interfaces the ROM was 
written by Tony Tebby. 

The system is plain, sim- 
ple and likeable. Unfortu- 
nately, in the last month the 
price of £113,85 has been 
overshadowed by price re- 
ductions of other interfaces. 
Only the combined 

interface/drive package, 
£249.00, remains competi- 
tive. 

Silicon Express Ltd, 
FREEPOST, Rothlcy, 

Leicester LE7 7QZ. Tel: 
0533-374917. 



The return of Centronics 



SMC has recently joined the 
ranks of QL add-on sup- 
pliers and its first product is 
that old faithful, the RS232 
to Centronics converter. 

As with nearly all the 
others, it fits between the 
SER1 port and a Centronics 
printer and operates at the 
QL default setting of 9600 
baud. As the baud rate is not 
switchable it could be a 
problem if you want to use 
SER2 at the same time, for 



example with a modem. 

Despite having the advan- 
tage of being guaranteed for 
\1 months, the price of 
£39.95 is well above that 
charged for the same sort of 
product from other com- 
panies — so shop around 
before buying. 

SMC Supplies, 11 West- 
ern Parade, Great North 
Road, Barnet, Hertfordshire 
ENS IAD. Tel: 01-441- 
1282. 




mmr kardtaart im pan* 38 



MNCLAIR USER Auguul935 



11 



L 



QL Hardware World 



Delta in a sea of discs 



TECHNOLOGY Research, 
which is well known to 
Spectrum users for its popu- 
lar Beta disc interface, has 
now turned its attention to 
the QL and released the 
Delta interface. That looks 
to be as popular ; u has a well 
thought out disc interface 
and parallel printer port, 
RAM disc software built in 
and space onboard for up to 
128K extra memory. 

Like most other disc in- 
terfaces it is capable of sup- 
porting On, 3^in and SViin 
drives in either 40- or 80- 
track format. As it uses the 
FLP device name, discs 
from other systems, such as 
CST and Silicon Express, 
can be used with it. 

Unlike other interfaces, it 
has two very useful addi- 
tional features. If you put a 
40-track disc in an 80-track 
drive the system witl auto- 



matically double step the 
head so that you can read 
and write to it. ff you have a 
double-sided drive there is 
the facility to force the sys- 
tem to Format a disc as 
single-sided. These features 
mean that, within reason, 
you can swop discs between 
different systems and 
drives. 

As with the Silicon Ex- 
press interface, Delta adds 
FLP_USE to SuperBasic 
plus all the various machine 
level hooks — the software 
was written by Tony Tebby. 
There is also RAM_USE for 
the RAM discs. Up to eight 
separate RAM discs can be 
set up. 

Like the Silicon Express, 
it first looks to the disc for a 
boot program, then the mic- 
rodrive. But unlike Silicon 
Express it remembers to 
turn the drive off. 




The unit is quite small, 
not much bigger than the 
CST interface, and is 
housed in a plastic cover. 
The onboard memory takes 
its power from the QL and 
does not require an extra 
power supply. 

The Delta interface is 
priced at a verv competitive 
£129.50 including VAT; 
with 64K £199.50 or 128K 
£249.50. It does not have 



the range of Toolkit com- 
mands that the CST inter- 
face has but those can be 
purchased separately — 
members of IQLUG can get 
them for only £1.00. It is 
good value and could knock 
CST from the top spot. 

Technology Research 
Ltd, Unit 18, Central Trad- 
ing Estate, Staines, Mid- 
dlesex TW18 4XE. Tel: 
0784-63547. 



OPUS WILL MAKE YOU A 
BETTER ORGANISER 
FOR. ONLY £60 




Getting organised couldn't be easier. Phone us on 
0737 65080 or simply post the coupon be-low. 



If your micro system is starting to get out of hand a 
smart organiser could be the solution to your 
problems. 

At just £59.95 the Organiser desk from Opus 
Supp I ies wil I help to organ ise you r system 
beautifully, it's purpose built to provide plenty of 
storage space and because it's produced alongside 
our range of executive computer desking it offers 
a level of quality you'll appreciate. 

Shelving accommodates your monitor, printer 
computer, disc drive or cassette recorder and 
software, and the teak-finished unit is fitted with 
castors to make it fully mobile. The Organiser's 
assembled dimensions are: H. 31", W, 40% * and 
D. 26". 

And our price includes VAT and FREE DELIVERY. 

The Organiser desk is suitable for use with all 
leading home micros including the BBC, Amstrad, 
Commodore and Sinclair computers. 



To; Opus Supplies Ltd. 

55 Onnside Way. Hplmetfrorpe Industrial Estate, RedhM, Surrey. 

Please rush m* the following 
(PRICES INCLUDE VAT AND CARRIAGE) 

, Organiser Deskfs) at £59.9 5 each line. VAT) 

(enclose a cheque far £ or please debit my 

credit Card ateotM* with th* amount of £ , 



My Access j Barclaycard : < (please tick i no is - 



Name_ 



"V.1-,lri"-s 



TV-k'uhonc . 



SUB/OSS 



Opus. 



55 OrmskJe Way, 
Hoimethorpe Industrial 
Estate. RedhHI. Surrey 

TELEPHOflf OTJMWO 



Z J 



38 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



Hardware World — 



Disc system 
with mother 



WITH the recent flood of 
disc interfaces for the Spec- 
trum the Gordon Micro- 
frame has been Largely over- 
looked. Although at £149. 50 
inclusive it is the most ex- 
pensive it does have more 
potential than the others and 
can be built up into a very 
comprehensive system. 

The Microframe is a disc- 
based motherboard system 
with a range of plug-in 
cards. A number of cards 
are under development at 
the moment, ranging from a 




simple Centronics interface 
through A to D, D to A, 
RS232 — for use with a 
modem — to I/O cards suit- 
able for robotics. 

The disc interface soft- 
ware is held on disc and 
booted into 16K of onboard 
RAM. That RAM is paged 
when a syntax error occurs. 
That means that not only is 
the DOS easily changeable 
but also that you can extend 
the Spectrum Basic; for ex- 
ample, the I/O boards can 
be driven using a Logo-like 
language. 

As a disc system it is old 
fashioned in that it only uses 
single density. That, typi- 
cally, gives 98K for storage 
on a 40 track, single-sided 
drive, and up to four drives 
can be used. 




Doffing caps at keyboard 



THE DK'tronics keyboard 
has undergone many design 
changes since it was first 
introduced for the ZX-S1, 
but it has always retained 
stuck-on legends. DK'tro- 
nics has now relented, and 
printed keycaps are avail- 
able as an optional extra for 
the Spectrum keyboard. 

The caps are printed in 
one colour, black, although 
the caps themselves are grey 
for the main keyboard, and 
red for the numeric pad. 

Fitting the caps is simply 
a case of pulling the old ones 
off and pressing the new 
ones on. Instructions are not 
included, which would have 
been useful as you could 
damage something by being 
heavy handed. 

For only £6.00 inclusive 
the caps are good value if 
you own a DK'tronics 
keyboard. If not, they could 
tip the scales in its favour if 
you are about to buy. 

Three-colour printed caps 



might have been preferable, 
even at a few pounds more, 
but it is a step in the right 
direction. 

DK'tronics Ltd } Unit 6, 
Shirehill Industrial Estate, 
Saffron Walden, Essex 
CB11 3AQ. Tel: 0799- 
26350. 




All the necessary com- 
mands are available: Load, 
Save and Verify for Basic, 
Code and Data plus Format 
and Erase. Open and Close 
are soon to be added. As it 
does not take up any of the 
Spectrum memory, even for 
a buffer, transferring soft- 
ware to disc is relatively 
easy. Gordon expects to re- 
lease commercial software 
on the system soon. 

The motherboard has 
been well thought out and it 
is quite straightforward to 
add your own boards. 

The manual is compre- 
hensive and gives details of 
all the relevant pin outs plus 
a description of what each 
one is used for. There are 
example programs, with 



some simple ones on disc, 
including one showing how 
to extend the Basic. 

Although the board can 
be powered from the Spec- 
trum Gordon does not re- 
commend it as the toler- 
ances arc tight. It is de- 
signed to be powered from 
disc drives and, if those 
need power, Gordon sup- 
plies a supply for £63.25 inc. 

The system is expensive, 
as you are paying for facili- 
ties that you are unlikely to 
use. In education, however, 
those facilities would be 
used to the full. 

Gordon Microframe Ltd, 
3 Callendar Road, Heath- 
field Industrial Estate, Ayr, 
Scotland KA8 9DJ, Tel: 
0292-280467 



Button-down transfers 

INTERFACE III is a com- 
bined hardware and soft- 
ware package which allows 
you to transfer a program. 

Once the program is 
loaded a button on the inter- 
face is pressed and a special 
copy is then put out to tape. 
After resetting;, the interface 
software is loaded and the 
copy reloaded. 

Interface III priced at 




£39.95 is awkward to use, 
requiring a lot of loading, 
saving and resetting. 

Micro Centre, Bridge 
Street, Evesham , Worces- 
tershire, Tel: 0386-49641. 



Rock-bottom 32K upgrades 



ALTHOUGH Sinclair is no 
longer building 16K Spec- 
trtims, some shops still have 
few left in stock and are 
selling them at bargain 
prices, in some cases for as 
litde as £69.95. Upgrade 
prices are also coming down 
so if you are prepared for a 
little DIY you could end up 



with new 48K Spectrum for 
only £89.95. 

The cheapest upgrade we 
have found is the Citadel 
32 K memory expansion, 
£20.00 to readers of Sinclair 
User, £24.00 to everyone 
else, including VAT and 
p&p. It has an advantage in 
that it uses 64K chips, 



rather than 32 K, so that if 
you buy the TV Services of 
Cambridge system, you get 
two 32 K pages of memory. 
First catch a 16K Spec- 
trum, then contact Citadel 
Products Ltd, 50 High 
Street, Edgware, Middlesex 
HAS 7EP. Tel: 01-951 1848. 

more tiardtvare on page 40 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



» 



— Hardware World 



Transformation 



TRANSFORM is consi- 
dered by many to have pro- 
duced the Rolls Royce of the 
add-on keyboards for the 
Spectrum. 

While other keyboard 
companies have reduced 
prices, or even stopped pro- 
ducing since the launch of 
the Spectrum Plus, Trans- 
form has shrugged it aside, 
improved its keyboard, and 
increased die price to £79.95. 



The improvements are 
the inclusion of four shifted 
cursor keys and an addition- 
al Caps Shift to the right of 
the bottom row of keys, 
matching the one on the left, 
The numeric pad has been 
altered to include a Full 
Slop and an additional linter 
key. The old single key 
functmns on the main key- 
board are retained, 

Inside, the additional in- 




terface required by some 
Spectrum Issue 5 users is 
fitted as standard. The pow- 
er supply now has to be 
connected to the keyboard, 



Slow moving joystick device 



THE NIDD Valley Slo- 
mo was a good idea, as was 
the Kemps ton joystick stan- 
dard. DK'ironics has 
brought out the Games Play- 
er, a combined slow motion/ 
Kempston compatible joys- 
tick interface. 

The Kempston standard 
is available on most popular 
games and the ability to slow 
down a game to a manage- 



able speed is a boon to 
finger-bruised alien zappers. 

The interface has a joy- 
stick socket , speed control 
and slow motion on/off 
switch on the top. Unlike 
Slotno you can not freeze the 
action completely but you 
can slow it down more than 
enough for most needs, At 
£14.95 it is good value. 

Meanwhile Nidd Valley 



has stated that if their UK 
Patent application is suc- 
cessful slow motion 
peripherals will only be 
available from them. The 
ensuing wrangle could be 
interesting. 

DK'ironics, Unit 6, 
Shir chill Industrial Estate, 
Saffron Walden, Essex 
CB11 3AQ. Tel: 0799- 
26350, 



a lead then plugs into the 
back of the Spectrum. The 
redesign, and the metal 
case, results in the keyboard 
weighing over 3kg even be- 
fore the Spectrum is fitted, a 
veritable heavyweight. 

The Transform is de- 
finitely for the serious user; 
the key switches alone cost 
the manufacturer more than 
the Spectrum Plus upgrade, 
and it is the only keyboard 
with three-colour key caps. 
Transform might not sell 
many keyboards at that 
price but there are times 
when only the best will do. 

Transform Ltd, 24 West 
Oak, Beckenham, Kent 
BR3 2EZ. Tel: 01-658 6350. 




VJSA 



Announcing the B R5 S| 

miRRGE 
miCRODRIVER 



At the louch of a button you can transfer^ your programs onto Microdrive 

cartridge. 

Al last the Full potential and speed of the ZX Microdrives can be realised by 

ail 48K Special m and Spectrum + owners, for only £39. 95. 

Features: 

* Transfer any program onto Microdrive cartridge. 

* Freeze any ■game at any point, save It, and restore II later. 

* Use the "POKE" facility to give your sett Infinite live* etc. 

The Mirage Microdmer consisls of a HAM PACK style case which 
simply plugs onto Ihe rear of the ZX Interface 1. An expansion 
connector is provided lor Ihe connection ol other peripherals. The 
software has been designed to be easy to use and is menu driven, it 
resides orv a 4K ROM contained within the Mtcrodriver so (here is no 
fussing with tapes to get it to run. Al you need to do is press Ihe 
button on the side 

Nota: Trill unit t» Intended to* software owners (o transfer Inelr own programs 
onto miOTOdnV* cartridge* for lf iii d end MM Of ecceaa. Programs uved using 
the Mirage Mlerpdriver are unread**** unlets the Microdrive* Is present. 

How to Order 

Send a cheque for £44.95, including £5 for postage and packing, to the 
address below, or use your Access or Visa card Dy telephoning (0376) 
48321 la place your order immediately 
Pieasa allow za days for delivery. 



y MIRAGE 



A 



Micro computers 

Limited 



24 Bank Street, 
Braintree, 
Essex CM7 7UL 
Tel: (0376) 43321 




Ro Ironies 
Portable Case 

■ 23" k IS' Cubed loam 

■ Holds Spectrum 
and peripherals 

■ Cuuipanenrr, work 
m silu 



AH p»icf s iidirdf VA T andp i p. P*as* marks 
yaw ctaquc'PO paydblc In 5H' Or uua!c 
flccass Ed-i.:ldifCJid number Wrilt mw mmt 
and adurrss ctaaily Please allow 28 Oafs hrr 
ttMYt'f SIKT Fflftposi Gr*Bns Norton, 
TawCKfor tlrnlhanls . NN12 SBR 




40 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 




The SAGA 1 EMPEROR has 67 keys which enable easy access to every function. The SAGA 1 EMPEROR 
makes obsolete the "stretch requirement" of other keyboards and enhances the ability to touch type. For 
Business or pleasure the Emperor will make your computing time more productive and enjoyable. Now 
available for the Spectrum + ONLY £49.95 

FOR GREAT GRAPHICS . . . 





LflUTYMENU COLOUR MENU 

YOU'VE GOT TO HAVE STYLE! ^ 

Whether you are 5 or 95, using joystick or GP, full 

colour STYLE puts you in direct command of your 

graphics. Already in use in software houses and educational 

establishments, uses range from screen design to Business to pure fun. Our unique design e!tm 

endless reading of manuals. STYLE displays all options on screen, enabling you to start designi 

from menu to menu fast, with some very useful built in routines, STYLE offers exceptional vaiue 

containing both Software and full Kempston compatible hardware for GP or Joystick operation. 

STYLE £29.95 SAGA GP £79.95 (Graphics tablet for Style) 



i nates 
ng and flip 
for money, 



SOUNDBOOST 

Connect and go system 
puts adjustable sound 
through your TV 
Speaker ONLY £9.95 



FLEXICABLE 

Now with two connector 
ports, exceptional value, a 
must for add-ons 
ONLY £12.95 



DUSTCOVER 

Keep your equipment clean 
and smart, our popular 
dustcover does this and 
more ONLY £4.95 



PERSONAL CARRIER 

Or how to slore your equipment, our 
PCI is capable of holding computer, 
peripherals, magazines and 
software, arid makes everything 
neat and portable 
A MUST at ONLY E26.95 







Please 
send me 

the 
following 
products: 



Available across the UK and from retailers 
in the following countries: 
AUSTRALIA — BELGIUM — DENMARK — 
FINLAND — FRANCE — HOLLAND — 
GERMANY — ITALY — SPAIN — SWEDEN 
NEW ZEALAND — SWITZERLAND 

Tel; (04862) 22977 Telex; 8813467 



Pi fiacQ U 'SAGA 1 EMPEROR at £49.95 (48K or +?) 
n *SAGA GP at £79.95 
STYLE at £29.95 (inc P&P) 
DUSTCOVER at £4,95 (inc P&P) 
SOUNDBOOST at £9.95 (inc P&P) 
FLEXICABLE at £12.95 (inc P&P) 
■PERSONAL CARRIER at £26.95 

'Please add £1 .50 UK or £4.50 overseas Post and Packing 
DEPT SAGA SYSTEMS LIMITED, 2 EVE 

ROAD, WOKING, SURREY GU21 4JT 
Name ADDRESS 



AMOUNT ENCLOSED £ 



f 



My Access Card No. is [ 
IGNATURE 



i i i i i i i i i i i i r I 



DATE 



SUB 



Delivery promised within 28 Days 



QWCKSHOT It AUTO RAPlOFmi JOYSTICK 



SPECTRUM INU 



■i 



■m^m^m 



SPECTRUM UPGRADE KIT 



-J£ 




"RBOWTfRFACF 



Four great new add-ons from Ram, Number One in 
everything for the Spectrum. . , 
TURBO INTERFACE 

Our unique Turbo Interface outperforms any Spectrum 
interface - it works with ROM cartridges, 2 standard joysticks, 
and there's a full expansion bus at the rear. The Turbo supports 
Kempston, Protekand Interface 2 software and loads from 
cassette - or instantly from a ROM cartridge. It really makes 
the most of the Quickshot ll"s rapid-fire action, and with a 
unique built-in power safety device, it's amazing value at 
just £22,95. 
QUICKSHOT II AUTO RAPID-FIRE JOYSTICK 

The famous Quickshot II is the top games joystick, with a 
sleek trigger fire button for quick reactions, an auto fire switch 
for continuous shooting and a new, improved grip. 
Revolutionary built-in stabilising suction cups mean a sure, firm 
grip -a snip at £955 

SPECTRUM INTERFACE 

Boost the power of your Spectrum, or Spectrum + . 
This Kempston-compatible interface gets the most from your 
games- electrify your enemies with real power and 
lightning-fast reactions right under your fingertips. 
Costs just £9,95, 
SPECTRUM UPGRADE KIT 

If you've a 16K Spectrum micro, this handy and 
inexpensive add-in kit boosts the RAM memory to a powerful 
48 K, so you can run the latest and greatest software, the most 
exciting games around - and expand your own programming 
possibilities! Only £21 .95. 

Where can you get your hands on Ram's amazing 
Spectrum add-ons? You can see them at branches of Boots. 
Menzies. Spectrum Group computer centres, and good 
computer stores everywhere, Or return the coupon below, 

To: RAM Electronics {Fleet} Ltd (Dept SU I JOB Fleet 
Road, Fleet Hampshire GUIS SPA 

Credit Card hot tine: 0251425252. (Access & Visa). 



Address 




Please send me 



Spectrum Turbo Interface(s) at £22.95. 

Quickshot II Joystick® at £9 95. 

Spectrum Interfaces) at £9.95. 

Spectrum Upgrade Kit(s} at £2 1 ,95. 
(Please -state issue 2 □ Of SO) 



+£lper order P+P{£3 Qvme<>$) TOTAL £ 



□ I enclose cheque/postal order D charge my Access/Visa 



g rin 



n 



Expiry Date_ 



Postcode 



Telephone 

24 Hour despatch tor credrt cards and postal outers (7 days for cheques.) 
All products are I ully compatible with trie Spectrum. Spectrum + 
and Sinclair Microdrive*. 
RamEI«±ioiYi(FlH4LM|DcplSU 1. 106FIMI Read. fin*. H»np5lw?CuUBWL 

^^ m Trade and export enquiries weto 



J 

welcome 




"II 





J 



^ 



H 



EB 






SPECTRUM 48K 
AMSTRAD 464 

£9.95 



GARGOYLE GAMES LTD.. 74 KING STREET. DUDLEY, WEST MIDLANDS DV2 8QB 
f Hirphoiuj ISiiltts} 0384 238777 (General} 0384 237222 



Acute add-on allergy? 
Chronic hardware headaches? 
Don f t suffer in silence — 
write to Sinclair Surgery. 



Sinclair Surgery 




Spare slot 
required 

I WOULD like to buy a 
Hantrex 1 2m high resolution, 
green screen, composite video 
monitor. My present system 
consists of Spectrum, Wafad- 
rive, Kempston Centronics 
Interface E and a Shinwa 
CP80 Printer, How can I 
connect a monitor to the edge 
connector when ail edge con- 
nectors are occupied? 

1 believe that some change 
has to be made to the Spec- 
trum to take the monitor. 

A Richards, 
Taunton, Somerset 
# You need a two-way edge 
connector to give you a spare 
sloi — the Currah Microslot 
from DlCtwnks (0799 26350) 
priced £7.95 would be suitable 
— and a mttmtar lead. Trans- 
form (01-658 6350) can supply 
one for £U SO, 

Spectrum Plus 
minus Guide 

I HAVE recendy bought a 
Spectrum Plus but I am dis- 
appointed with the new style 
User Guide, CouJd you re- 
commend a good book for the 
Spectrum that would help me 
with advanced Basic prog- 
ramming and which goes into 
assembly language and 
machine code, or is there 
anywhere that sells the origin- 
al Spectrum User Guide separ- 
ately? 

Sam Clifford, 
Ivybridge, 
Devon 
9 The original manual can be 
obtained from CPC, 194-200, 
North Road, Preston, Lanes — 
£2 MI — the introduction book- 
let is 88 pence. Unfortunately 
they have a minimum charge of 
£5,00 plus £3.25 handling plus 
VAT — £9,49. 
You could ftv Spectrum 



Machine Language for the 
Absolute Beginner, Mel- 
bourne House i £6.95. 

Look before 
you leap 

PLEASE advise me on what 
to look for in a good modem; 
the facilities and interfaces 
they require and the advan- 
tages and disadvantages of 
those systems. 

Anil Malhotra, 
Billericay, Essex 

You seem to be going about 
this in the wrong way. First you 
should decide what you wans to 
do with a modem and then you 
should start looking at hard- 
ware. Otherwise you will end 
up paying for facilities you will 
never use. 

Dead flesh 
revitalised 

1 HAVE been considering 
upgrading my Spectrum's 
rubber keyboard to a proper 
keyboard. Are there any up- 
grade keyboards available 
with do not use the Spec- 
trum's old keyboard matrix? 
ts it possible to buy a power 
supply separately and at what 
price? 

Brenden Gorman, 
County Down, 
Northern Ireland 
9 None of the full-sized 
keyboards for the Spectrum use 
the original membrane. Power 
supplies can be obtained from 
TV Services of Cambridge, 
Frenches Road, Cambridge or 
CPC, 194-200, North Road, 
Preston, Lancashire. 

48 into 16 
won't go? 

I HAVE a Sinclair 16K Spec- 
trum, The serial number is 
001-239113, which 1 assume 



is an Issue 1. 

Am I able to obtain an 
internally fitted upgrade to 
48 K? From where? Most 
advertisements state Issues 2 
or 3 only. 

D T Brooks, 
Park Gate, 
Southampton 
% If it is an Issue I Spectrum 
you will be lucky to find an 
internal memory upgrade for it. 
The serial number is not a good 
indication. Look m the back at 
the edge connector; if there are 
chips close to the edge connector 
then it is a 2 or 3. 

Head needs 
examining 

CAN YOU tell me if it is 
possible to pnnl out alongside 
a microdrive CATaloguc, in- 
formation on whether a prog- 
ram is Basic, CODE, or 
DATA? JRMackaiU, 

Scunthorpe, 
South Humberside 
% In order to get that informa- 
tion you have to look at the file 
header on the microdrive can- 
ridge. Master youi ZX Mic- 
rodrive by Andy Pennell from 
Sunshine Publications — 
£6.95 — contains a suitable 
program. 

Spectrum's 
icy blasts 

I RECENTLY had my Spec- 
trum Plus returned from 
Sinclair after a replacement 
keyboard was fitted and now 
find that over-heating prob- 
lems occur. 

Programs crash for no 
apparent reason, the screen 
display occasionally becomes 
distorted and even Scrabble 
makes up words that it will 
not accept later. 

Those problems disappear 
after a blast of cold air from a 
hair-dryer, only to return 20 
minutes later. What can be 



done about it? 

G Twidale, Scunthorpe, 
South Humberside 

9 If it does not work, send it 
back with a covering letter 
outlining the problems. If can 
only get worse. 

Address 

unknown 

I AM building a general pur- 
pose I/O port for my Spec- 
trum and am puzzled by the 
I/O signals produced. The 
manual states that only the 
first five address lines are 
used by the Spectrum, and 
three more — A ? — *A 7 — can 
be used for other external 
devices. 

I have checked the status of 
those last three lines and it 
appears that A^ and A 7 are 
constantly active, while A s 
remains inactive until the 
keyboard is used, 

Philip Clegg, 

Camberley, 

Surrey 

The Spectrum Hardware 
Manual by Adrian Dickens, 
£5.95 from Melbourne House, 
shows you how w add a Z8Q 
PlO to the Spectrum and gives 
details of which lines are free. 

One size 
fits some 

1 BOUGHT a Spectrum Plus 
upgrade kit and when 1 tried 
to attach my Kempston inter* 
face and joystick, it would not 
fit. 1 1 looks as though I will 
have to buy a ribbon con- 
nector, 

D N Tandziel, 
Middlesborough , 
Cleveland 
9 Although electrically there is 
no great difference between a 
Spectrum and Spectrum Plus 
they are physically different and 
some add-ons wUl not fit in the 
back of a Plus. If possible 
check before buying. 



SINCLAIR 0SER August 1985 



45 



ONE OF THE biggest problems 
when using 280 machine code 
is finding places to put 
numbers. In Basic, there are plenty of 
variables and arrays which can be used 
to store data, but in ZSO there are just 
a few registers. 

One way around that is to use an 
instruction: 

LD (address), register 
which would place the value of the 
register into the contents of the 
specified address. A belter method, 
however, is known as the 'stack'. 

A stack is a type of data structure, 
in much the same way as an array, list* 
queue and so on. With an array, you 
tell the computer which element you 
want by giving the array subscripts. 
With a list, you start at the 'head' and 
move towards the 'tail'. A queue is 
known as a First In First Out (FIFO) 
structure because you add items to the 
end of the queue and take them away 
from the start. 

A stack is a Last In First Out 
(UFO) structure- Imagine a stack of 
plates. Trying to take a plate from the 
middle of the stack is likely to have 
disastrous results. You will probably 
also have problems if you try to put a 
plate into the middle. You can only 
safely place and remove plates from 
the top. In Z80 machine code, those 
operations are known as PUSH and 
POP, 

ZRO only allows you to PUSH and 
POP two registers at a time, giving the 
instructions: 

PUSH AF ; POP AF 

PUSH BC ; POP BC 

PUSH DE ; POP DE 

PUSH HL ; POP HL 

So, for example, the code 

LD HL, 1234 

PUSH HL 

LDHL, 4321 
would leave HL containing the 
number 4321. However, if we now 
execute the instruction 

POPHL 
then the number 1234 will be restored 
to HL. One interesting point is that 
the stack does not know which 
registers it has stacked ; all it has done 
is place two bytes onto the stack. 
Therefore, instead of the last 
instruction, we could just as easily 
use, say, 

POPBC 
which would overwrite the contents of 
the BC registers with the number 
1234. 

The main point to remember when 
using PUSHes and POPs is that they 



Shaping up with 
stacks of data 

How to store data in Z80 code; 

Marcus Jeffery fills in 

on assemblers and 

colours in 

shapes 




must always 
a matching pair. 
If you allow values to 
be stacked without POPping, 
the area set aside for the 
stack will eventually run out of room. 
The location of the top of the stack 
is held in a register pair called, 
surprisingly, the Stack Pointer, which 
is abbreviated to SP. Bearing that in 
mind, another useful instruction is 

EX (SF), HL 
which will exchange the last two bytes 
placed on the stack with the contents 
of the HL register pair, 



Remember 

that the brackets 

indicate that we want the 

'contents of the location 

addressed by' the contents 
of the Stack Pointer, not the contents 
of the Stack Pointer. Those 
instructions are shown at the end of 
the article in figure four. That also 
shows a few other instructions which 
operate on the Stack Pointer, though 
you're unlikely to find those very 
useful as yet. 

Though your use of the stack is 
likely to be limited to the above 
instructions under most 

circumstances, it is far more flexible. 
For example, you will have noticed 
the instructions CALL and RET in 
recent programs. Those act in the 
same way as GO SUB and RETURN 



Figure 1 

10 CLEAR 59999 

ZO GO SUB 1000 

30 CLB 

tl.O CIRCLE 120,100,20 

50 POKE 23726,1201 POKE 13729. 
100 

go RANDOMIZE USR 60000 
100 STOP 
lOOO HEM HEX LOAD ROUTINE 
1010 DEF FN p<H>-CODl n*< * ) -1*6-7 
*(CODE h*(x)>-65) 
1020 LET bytm-o 
1,030 RESTORE 2000 
1040 READ it*pi 
1050 REAP h* 

1060 IF h*."*" THEN GO TO II60 
1070 IF LEI* H*<>2*INT (LEI* H*/2 J 

THEN PRINT "Odd number Of h*H 
flltita in: " : n» I STOP 
1060 FOR 1-1 TO LEW n* 
I090 IF HOT <[htU>>-"0" AND hf< 
l><-"9") OR <h»{i>>-"A" AND htli 
)<-"D) THEN PRINT "111***1 rt 
ax dial CI "Sh*(l>: STOP 
H oq NEXT 1 

1110 FOR 1-1 TO LEU h* STEP 2 
1120 POKE start *byte. 16*FN (*(!>-» 



FN p ( i * 1 > 




1130 


LET byte>bytc>l 


1U0 


NEXT 


1 


1 15Q 


QO TO 1950 


1160 


PRINT "Cods entered" 


1170 


PAUSE 150 


1160 


RETURN 


£000 


DATA 


60000. "ECUBBOSC" 


2010 


DATA 


■"CD66EA**, "C*" 


2020 


DATA 


"C&". "CD6EEA" . "CI" 


2D3Q 


DATA 


"iF", "A6", "CO", "7B" 


2040 


DATA 


"CDBEEA" . "C5" , "Od" 


2D JO 


DATA 


"3IBD", "90", "CJififiEA" 


2060 


DATA 


"CI", "C^ H . "05" 


l?Q70 


DATA 


,, E46BEA","C1"."C5" 


■ io5 


DATA 


"SC", "C46BEA". "CI" 


2090 


DATA 


" , OD","E*l6aEA","C9" 


2100 


DATA 


"79", "E607" , "5F" 


2110 


DaTa 


■•eflag-, "efl39","*cB39" 


2120 


DATA 


"3EAF" , "go", «U7« 


2130 


DATA 


"E£3B". "C»27". "CB27" 


a 1 1 d 


DATA 


"14", "AF" "7A","E607" 


2150 


DATA 


"67". "7 8". "E*C0" 


2160 


DATA 


* , CB3F' , ."CB3F*\ "C63F" 


2170 


DATA 


"an", "e&tio" . "67" . "J13" 


2180 


DATA 


"0*1". "AF", "37"."CftX*'" 


2190 


DATA 


"10FC". "C9" 


3200 


DATA 


"flfi", "77". "C9" ,"*■■ 



46 



SINCLAIR USER August IMS 




Machine Code 



in Spectrum Bask. The instruction 

CALL address 
transfers execution to the specified 
address, and 

RET 
returns to the instruction immediately 
following the CALL. However, when 
thai happens* the computer has got to 
know where to return to. 
Consequently, when the CALL 
instruction is executed^ the computer 
PUSHes the value of the location 
following the CALL statement onto 
the stack. Then^ when a RETurn 
statement is found, the stack is 
POPped to tell the computer which 
code to execute next. 

Now we are ready for this month's 
example program, which will allow 
you to fill in any shape on the screen. 
To run this just type in "and run the 
Basic program in figure one — the 
Hex Loader is the same as usual. To 
use the routine generally, POKE the 
x-eoordinate into locadon 23728 and 
the y-coordinate into 23729. Those 



two locations among the system 
variables — User Guide, page 130 — 
are normally unused. 

Figure two shows the equivalent in 
assembly code. The PBYTE routine 
takes the screen coordinates V and 'y' 
— in C and B, respectively — and 
calculates the coordinates of the screen 
byte, placing the result into the HL 
register pair. In addition, a single bit 
is set in the A register, corresponding 
to the bit within die HL byte which 
represents the (x^y) coordinate. The 
letters in brackets, given in the 
comments on the right-hand side of 
the listing, refer to figure three, which 
should help to explain how the BC 
coordinates are convened into the HL 
location. 

The routine works by filling in the 
(x,y) pixel — assuming that it is not 
already filled — then doing the same 
for the pixels to the North, South, 
East and West. Those in turn, if filled, 
will fill in four directions, and so on. 

In that way, the whole shape is 





Figure 2 


ORG 
LOAD 


60000 
60000 






E*fiO ED»BB05C FILL 


LD 


BC. (813728) 


;3ct start caordln*t«i 




EAo* CD6SEA 


CALL 


FBYTB 


iFlll rrtm tia*-e 




EAa? C? 


RET 




iftETum to BASIC 




BAGS CS TiVTS 


PUSH 


BC 


! Stack BC * 




&A6? CDBEEA 


CALL 


PBVT1 


IKL = Screen addFtii 




KAoC CI 


POP 


BC 


: Restore- BC (cosrdln*t«i) ■ 




Ea6D 5f 


LD 


E. A 


i Save A (bit hhK) * 




EA&E A6 


AND 


(HL) 


:If Scrcvrt bit net empty. 




EAiF CO 


RET 


HZ 


: thinn RET UP in 




EA70 7B 


LD 


A, E 


5 R*ttt>P« A * 




tA?l CDBEEA 


CALL 


P3CRH 


iFUL the tcrten pulni 




EA7U C5 


PUSH 


BC 


i Stack coordlnata * 




EA75 al 


INC 


B 


: Look HORTH 




EA76 3ESO 


LD 


A, 176 






EA78 90 


SUB 


B 






EA79 C«*Sl* 


CALL 


KE.P&YTE 






EA7C CI 


POP 


BC 


:Hmtart coordinate * 




EA7D C5 


PUSH 


ac 


:St»ck ctordliute * 




EA7E 0-S 


DEC 


B 


; Leak SOUTH 




EA7F EflfcoEA 


CALL 


PO.FBYTE 






EAB2 CI 


POP 


BC 


i Restore e o o r d. I n *r * * 




EAfiJ Cb 


PUSH 


BC 


iStecfc eedtdintti * 




EAEJJ OC 


IMC 


C 


j Look EAST 




EAS5 C&6BEA 


CALL 


NZ.FBVTE 






EA8S CI 


POP 


ac 


tRcatBM coordinate * 




EAfl* OO 


btSrC 


c 


: Look WEST 




EaSA E46SEA 


CALL 


PO, EBYTE 






EA9D C9 


BET 








EASE 79 PBYTE 


LD 


a. •: 






EASE EG07 


AND 


7 


;Qet bit In bvt* (b! 




EA91 5F 


LD 


E. A 






EA»J CH35 


SRL 


C 


:Oet (a) in rBiitttP C 




E*5« CB39 


BML 


c 






EA96 CB39 


SRL 


c 






EA?S TEAT 


LD 


A. 175 


[Convert y- coord, to give 




EA9A 90 


SUB 


■ 


1 (O.O) at too-ltf i 




EA9B 47 


LD 


i.A 






EA.9C Efi3fl 


AMI. 


&6 


: Oat <d) lt> raelatar- A 




EA9E CB27 


SLA 


A 






EAAO C&27 


SLA 


A 






EAAJ Bl 


OR 


C 


:<Jet (d)»[») In rt(. A 




EAAS fiF 


LD 


L.A 


: than acvt to pet, L 




EAA4 7fi 


LD 


A, B 






EAA5 E607 


AND 


7 


< G* t (a) In rcflittr A 




EAA7 67 


LD 


H,A 


: Place t»mpor*.ril*< in H 




EAA0 7$ 


LD 


A.B 






EM9 E6CO 


AND 


192 


:3a* lc) lrt Mjlsttr A 




EAAB CBJF 


SUL 


A 


i Hovn to coaltlcn 




EAAD CB3F 


SRL 


A 






EAAF CD3P 


SRL 


A 






EAbl a* 


ADO 


H 


; Add ( • ) 




£A»S C64 


AMI' 


6*1 


: Add ■cr = en base addreaa 




EAB4 A7 


UP 


H, A 


; Place In register H 




EAB5 43 
EAB6 Oi 


LP 


B. E 


;B - bit in Hytt {*-''! 
|B - bit In tsyta (1-S^ 




INC 


B 




EAB7 AF 


XOft 


A 


; Clears A rtil^ter 




EAh& 37 


BCP 




;Set ssrrr flat, then 




EAB9 CB1K PBLOOP RB 


A 


rotate- ffirry Into 




EA&B 10FC 


PJNZ 


PBLOOP 


i bit position In A 




EABD C9 


RET 




; RETurn 




EASE Bfi PS CRN 


Oft 


(HL) 
(HL) .A 


;Set screen bit by ORitie 




EABF 77 


LD 


naak n*i t h cunent screen 




BACO C9 


RET 

END 








WDFKtrt* - AflQO to 


A95* 








org end - EAC1 










LOAD *nd - EACl 













Figure 3 






•<8it it* 

Bv#t* 

V* ■ t7«-y 


x <a^ 


.. <u> 


1 








„• | < c > ; <d>- 


i :<->' 


1 
















H |B|1 


9| C^> 


■<#> 


1 








L i w i : 


<a> 


1 









tilled. By writing a general routine — 
FBYTE — to carry out the operation, 
it can 'call itself to fill to the North, 
South, East and West! 

Remember that the return locations 
from the CALLs are all stacked, so the 
routine always knows where to return 
to. The only problem is that the (x,y) 
coordinates in BC would be 
overwritten, so we must stack those 
too. The comments marked with 
asterisks show which instructions are 
connected with saving and restoring 
values — imagine how messy that 
would be without the stack! 

That is by no means the quickest 
way of filling shapes, but is probably 
quick enough for most purposes. You 
might like to try it out in Basic, You 
can easily implement a stack, as 
follows: 

1 DIM s(1000) 

2 LET sp = 

PUSH; 1000 LET s(sp) = xcoord 

1010 LETs<sp+l) = ycoord 
1020 LETsp = sp + 2 
1030 RETURN 
POP: 2000 LET sp = sp-2 

2010 LET ycoord = s(sp+ 1) 
2020 LET xcoord = s(sp) 
2030 RETURN 
The major problem with this method 
of filling shapes is that it uses 
enormous amounts of stack space. If 
you try to fill large shapes on the 
screen, you may find the whole 
computer crashing as the stack runs 
out of space. The easy way to avoid 
that is to split large spaces into a 
number of smaller shapes. 

Assemblers 

If you are sufficiently attracted to the 

advantages of using machine code, 

then you will probably consider 

purchasing an Assembler package. 

The assembly code listings given in 

these articles use Spectre-Mac-Mon 

from Oasis Software, but other 

assemblers may have slightly different 

formats, 

Assembly code is usually divided 

into a number of fields. Those are 

LABEL MNEMONIC 

OPERAND COMMENT 

In some cases, such as the Zeu;- 

continued on page 48 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



47 



Machine Code 



continued f mm page 47 

Assembler from Sinclair Research, 
the source listing also contains line 
numbers, as in Basic. The first thing 
to look for is the method of entering 
those formatted instructions. 
On-screen editors arc obviously very 
useful. One very important feature is 
the use of labels — don't buy it if it 
doesn't use them. 

In addition to the normal Z80 



mnemonic 



instructions. 



most 



assemblers include 'pseudo-oper- 
ations'. Those include such 
mnemonics as ORG, to tell the 
computer where in memory to 
assemble the code. EQU allows 
constants to be assigned label names, 
making the listing more readable. DB 
— or similar — standing for Define 
Bytc> allows memory locations to be 
initialised to particular values. 

It is often possible to define 
'macros', which allow you to assign a 



Figure 4: New ZSO instruction codes 


FUSHrp 


— place the register pair (AF, BC, DE, HL: 




onto the top of the stack 


POPrp 


— remove ihc top two bytes from the top 




of the stack, placing the ton [cms 




into the register pair (AF, BC, DE, HL). 


EX (SP), HL 


— exchange the two bytes from the top 




of the stack with the contents of the 




HL register pair. 


Of the instructions we have seen so far, the following can also be used with the Stack. 


ADD HL, SP 


— add the Stack Pointer to the HL 




register pair. 


DECSP 


— decrement the Stack Pointer by one. 


INC SP 


— increment the Stack Pointer bv one. 


LD SP, (addr) 


— set the Stack Pointer to the contents 




of the specified address. 


LD SP, dau 


— place the given data into the Suck 




Pointer. 


LD SP.HL 


— set the Stack Pointer to the contents 




of the HL register pair. 


LD (addr), SP 


— place the contents of the Stack 




Pointer into the given address. 



name to a sequence of instructions, 
Conditional assembly allows you to 
decide whether certain pieces of code 
are assembled at assembly -time. Many 
more features may be found, varying 
between assemblers. 

Many assemhJers include 

'monitors'. Those allow you to 
examine memory, while running 
machine code. Though not absolutely 
necessary, the more serious machine 
code user will find those invaluable. 
Some important additional features to 
look for are the setting of 'break 
points', single-stepping, examination 
of registers, intelligent copy, modify 
memory and disassembly. 

When converting listed programs 
lor your own assembler, the two main 
points to check are; 

The Format: assemblers differ in 
the fields, length of labels, format of 
numbers, and so on; 

The Memory: assemblers arc likely 
to use different areas of memory. For 
instance, the routines given have all 
started from location 60000. However, 
the Zeus Assembler uses that as 
workspace, so the routines should be 
changed to start at, say, 30000. 

In all cases, check with the 
documentation given with your 
assembler. 



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SINCLAIR USER August WHS 




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51 




THOSE GOLDEN DAYS when 
you could buy a personal fleet 
of flash cars with the massive 
earnings from Alien Attack are long 
gone — if indeed they were ever here. 
It is not as easy as it was to get your 
programs accepted by software 
houses, and even if you are successful, 
you wilJ be lucky to afford a second- 
hand C5, let alone the proverbial 
Porsche. Writing software is as time 
consuming as ever — getting it pub- 
lished is a different ball game 



altogether and very frustrating. 

A potential hit game has to combine 
originality with good graphics and 
instant play ability. However, the 
quality of programming has improved 
dramatically in the Jast three years 
with games like Ultimate 's Knight 
Lore, and it is becoming increasingly 
difficult for amateur programmers to 
come up with the goods. 

Once a program has been completed 
to your satisfaction, you will want to 
send if off for evaluation. Software 



houses tend to specialise in programs 
of a particular kind, whether they are 
arcade games, adventures, simulations, 
utilities or strategy games. Although 
many software houses publish prog- 
rams from several categories, it is best 
to pick publishers most suited to the 
software you have written. 

Software publishers can also be 
divided into two further categories — 
those which deal in top of the range 
games and those which deal with 
budget software. Again, a number of 



52 



SINCLAIR USER Augvu 19»S 






I 



Programs for Profit 



companies produce both. 

Mike Cohen > managing director of 
Lothlorien says, "Up to a year ago, we 
were being sent games which we could 
put out. The market then became 
more critical and a higher standard is 
now demanded- Meanwhile, budget 
software surged forward and young- 
sters got their games accepted because 
of the budget ranges," 

Andrew Hewson of Hewson Con- 
sultants feels strongly against pocket 
money software, "We're not in- 
terested in the budget range because 
of the aura associated with it." He 
feels that if a game is good, it deserves 
to be marketed at a reasonable price. 

Although everything depends on 
programming quality, it is easier to gel 
your first attempts accepted by a 
budget software house than one deal- 
ing with more complex software 



submitted wasn't too boring/' One 
program submitted was a BMX bike 
game which had the spectators moving 
while the bike remained still. 

Many larger companies employ 
teams of in-house programmers, or 
freelance programming houses, to 
produce their software and very rarely 
use programs sent in for evaulation. 
"Lots of programmers don't have the 
three arts — programming, music and 



"It is easier to 

get accepted by a 

budget software 

house at first" 



graphics," explains Ocean's Paul Fin- 
nigan. Special teams are put together 
to work on each game, dealing exclu- 
Two such companies arc Mastertro- sively with those three areas. 



ok and Firebird, which publishes its 
Silver range, "Budget software pro- 
vides an opportunity for new software 
writers to enter the market," says 
James Leavey of Firebird. "We are 
fairly demanding and look for well 
programmed, machine code games," 
Leavey believes that programmers 
of the Silver range may one day come 



Finnigan continues, "If someone 
from the outside sent in a good game, 
we would invite him to come in and 
produce the game with the team or in 
some cases give him a job." 

"We have all sorts of development 
equipment," explains Finnigan. "The 
games are written on an Einstein or 
Sage and then downloaded to the 



ture writing with The Quill, feels that 
documentation is essential when send- 
ing in a utility program. "Those utili- 
ties which rely on a handbook should 
have a draft of that sent in as well. The 
handbook should be easily under- 
stood, free from mistakes and pre- 
sented in an interesting way. The 
handbook is as important as the 
utility." 

When your game has been accepted 
it is normal procedure to sign a 
contract with the publishing house 
concerned. It is always a good idea to 
have a contract checked by a solicitor 
but there are a few points you could 
look out for yourself. 

The company will usually buy the 
licence to market your game, although 
you will retain the copyright. Check 
the length of time they will hold that 
licence — it can vary from one year to 
an indefinite period. 

If possible, ensure that the company 
you are dealing with is rock solid and 
not about to go into liquidation. If the 
company goes bankrupt make sure 
that the licence reverts to you and not 
CO the liquidator. Then you will be 
able to resell the game. 

Have you sold the licence to your 
game for European or world rights:* 
An important point — a company 



up with a game worthy to be sold in Spectrum and Commodore 64, where ^ ^ ^ 

the more expensive Gold range, the music and other extras are added. 
"They've got to start somewhere — Software houses tend to receive 



they are the programmers of the fu- 
ture." And just because a game is sold 
on a budget label, it does not mean 
that it will not be successful. 



huge numbers of games for evaluation 
each month. Many fall by the wayside 
immediately, either because they lack 
originality, or because they are un- 
^^^^^^^^^^^h^^^^^^^^h playable. Companies are not in- 
terested in fruit machine games or yet 
WritinQ a POOd qame another PacMan, however good, 

~ P - ■ Mastertronic processes around 200 

IS JUSt 3 Deginning. game s a month and in May this year 
ninro. PHnoloY/ tpllfQ 220 games were looked at. Two games 

Clare tageiey iaiKs weri f picked om _ one which was 

tO programmers and almost marketable and one requiring 

publishers, charting lwecn four Mt i slx gariies a 
the software scene 



yet you will not know whether the 
game is being sold in the States. 

Contracts also state how you are 
being paid, whether by royalties and 
an advance, or just a flat payment. 
Christian Penfold from Automata 

continued tm page S4 



Booty has sold over 100,000 units 
for Firebird and Chiller, Mastertro- 
nic' s most successful game has sold 
over 100,000 copies on the Commod- 
ore 64 and 30,000 on the Spectrum. 

John and Jan Peel of Legend, which 
produced Valhalla, always come up 
with their own games ideas and em- 
ploy a team of in-house programmers. 

"Games which people have sent in 
are not even good enough to return 
asking for improvements," says Jan 
Peel. "I can say that the best stuff 



month, 
and has 40 or 50 people working on 
games which are at various stages of 
completion, 

John Maxwell from Mastertronic 
explains why many games cannot be 
looked at properly. "We can only 
spend ten minutes on each and many 
come in without instructions or any 
form of documentation and so cannot 
be evaluated properly," That is espe- 
cially important if you are submitting 
an adventure game. Without a map it 
would be impossible to evaluate with- 
in the 10 minutes available. 

Howard Gilberts from Gilsoft, the 
company which has changed adven- 



Dividing the spoils 

THIS is how the costing of a 
typical game priced at £6.95 
breaks down. The figures given 
are speculative and would app- 
ly to a small company with few 
overheads. 

The game is sold to the distri- 
butor for £3.82 leaving the soft- 
ware house £313 to cover all 
costs. Fifty per cent covers the 
cost of the blank cassette, du- 
plicating and the insert, while 
the artwork and advertising 
costs £1,00- Bulk delivery to 
distributors and the like costs 
about five pence per game. 

Royalties for the author are 
40 pence and administration, 
including telephone and all 
other overheads costs 30 pence 
— leaving the software house a 
profit of 88 pence. 



SINCLAIR USER Avgun &8S 



53 



Programs for Profit 



amiimted from page 53 

offers some advice. "Make sure a 
figure is stated rather than a percen- 
tage of the profit. Some software 
houses are entitled to deduct packag- 
ing, advertising, duplication and other 
costs from the price before royalties 
are worked out — the percentage is 
therefore lower than it looks." 

Royalties are usually based not on 
the retail price of the software, but on 
the sum left after selling the game to a 
distributor. Distributors will take, on 
average, a 55 per cent discount. 



Royalty payments are usually calcu- 
lated against the number of units the 
company expects to sell. If you think 
your game will sell less than the 
company has predicted go for a lump 
sum payment. However, if you feet it 
will be a success go for royalties, and 
an advance if possible- 
Advances can range from £100 to 
£2000 and upwards depending on the 
quality of the game. Royalties can 
range from 4 per cent to 20 per cent. If 
you receive a large advance, the 
chances are that the royalties pay 



ments will be lower and vice versa. 

Considering the software market 
has been chaotic over the last year, 
there is still a surprisingly large num- 
ber of companies willing to accept 
games as long as they come up to 
standard. There is no point sending in 
a game only good enough for a maga- 
zine listing. The software house will 
not even look at ii. If you can come up 
with the goods - they'll take ii. 




STEPHEN CURTIS from Wales 
is 22 years old, and became 
interested in computing at col- 
lege. 

"The first game I sold was 
Hammer House of Horror in 
1983 to Lasersound. I signed 
the contract but the company 
went bust, although I did get 
the advance/' 

Stephen has written about 13 
games of which 10 have been 
published. They include Morris 
Meets the Bikers for Automata, 
Tiler for Interceptor and his 
latest game, Nonterraqueous 
for Mastertonic, written with 
Mark Jacobs, 

"Approach four or five com- 
panies with your game — most 
won't reply unless they want it. 
I sent Nonterraqueous to four 
before Mastertronic. 

"In February one company 
offered me 50 pence for Nonter- 
raqueous and they had a game 
in the top ten. The royalty rate 
was only about 4 per cent." 

Stephen's advice to anyone 
thinking of going freelance is 
"Don't bother. Mainly because 
computer programs are becom- 
ing more and more sophisti- 
cated and development times 
are becoming longer and longer 
for less money" 



JOHN PRAGNELL from London 
is 28 years old and works as an 
advertising manager for IBM 
Systems User. 

"I got hold of an assembler 
and set myself a target — I 
visualised it but didn't make 
any detailed plans." The result 
— Overlords — was completed 
In February 1985 after nine 
months' programming. 

John sent the game to a 
number of companies including 
CCS, Acti vision and Hewson 
Consultants. At least two com- 
panies suggested that he try 
Loth lorien . Lot h I o rie n su g - 
gested enhancements which 
took a further two months and 
paid £500 advances on 15 per 
cent royalties. John expects to 
receive around 30 pence for 
each unit sold. 

John has already started on 
another game which he expects 
will take six months to write. 

"I would consider going free- 
lance as programming is satis- 
factory and addictive. It's a risk. 
You have to work for seven or 
eight months with no income, 
you get paid and start all over 
again. The biggest problem I 
had was time — if you've got a 
lot of time to spare you're OK. 
I'd like to work like that more." 



MIKE SINGLETON from Mersey 
is 34 years old and taught Eng- 
lish in a secondary school. 
Three years ago he went free- 
lance as a programmer. 

He became interested in com- 
puting in 1980. After six months 
he decided to learn 6502 mach- 
ine code. He wrote his first 
game, Space Ace, in machine 
code, which he sold to the now 
deceased software house Pet- 
soft. It sold around 100 copies. 
'The royalties in those days 
were pathetic, you couldn't last 
a week on them" 

He then wrote a number of 
games for different companies 
— one of his most successful 
being Snake Pit for Postern, 
written for the Pet and later 
converted to the Spectrum. 

His big break came in 1983 
when he was approached by 
Beyond Software to write a game 
for them. Nine months later 
Lords of Midnight was launch- 
ed. Doomdark's Revenge fol- 
lowed and Mike is at present 
working on another game for 
Beyond. 

After Space Ace, publishers 
have always approached him. 
His advice, "If you've got faith 
in your own abilities, go for 
royalties rather than a salary.' 



54 



SINCLAIR USER August 19$5 









SO FAR TN this series we have 
dealt with computer operations, 
such as input and output^ as iso- 
lated actions. 

Even in the simplest program , 
however, that is not the case. It is a 
feature inherent in Basic that one part 
of a program will have some effect on, 
or contact with, another part. 

You may think that is untrue because 
you can write programs which are 
made up of a series of subroutines) 
eliminating the use of GOTOs. Even 
then, however, you need to call those 
subroutines from somewhere within 
ihe program. Each routine is also like- 
ly to share variables with other parts of 
the program. 

Adherents to the structure school of 
thought are often fanatics who will 
condemn a program if they spot a 
GOTO- Although I have sympathy 
with them I admit that GOTO has its 
uses. 

For that reason , and also partly to 
get up the noses of structure fanatics, 
the Entry Program this month in- 
cludes many GOTOs. In the form 
shown in listing one it is easy to read 
and would have been longer if split 
into subroutines with a control routine 
at the top of the program, and the 
co-ordinate update would be unneces- 
sarily complex. 

The program also combines several 
topics featured in past articles. The 



John Gilbert shows 
how to program 
a simple keypad 

Finding 

the key to 

control 

program creates a keyboard control 
device, called a keypad, which oper- 
ates in a similar way to a joystick. It is 
used to move a character around the 
screen and then explode it. To do that 
we will be using the CODE function;, 
introducing a derivative of the INPUT 
command and skimming the surface 
of random number generation. 

Firstly, however, we must design 
the keypad. As it will probably need 
two hands to manipulate, the keypad 
should be in the centre of the 
keyboard and use the key configura- 
tion shown in figure one. 

I have chosen *P as ihe fire key, at 
the centre of the keypad, so that the 
control device is easy to find. 

If you read the previous article on 
codes, each key has a number allo- 
cated to it. The computer recognises a 




4tra^^.^ 



key by its code so it makes sense to 
bypass any conversion of character to 
code and give the computer a numeric 
value for each key. 

If you have the Sinclair Spectrum 
Basic Programming Manual turn to the 
list of character codes in appendix A. 
If , however, you are unfortunate 
enough to have the Spectrum Plus User 

continued on page 56 






100 

200 

300 

310 

400 

500 

600 

700 

800 

900 
1100 
1200 
1300 
3000 
1400 IF 
O 4000 
1500 IF 
5000 
1600 IF 
O 6000 
1700 IF 
O 700 
1900 GO 
3000 
3100 
3200 
4000 
4100 
4200 



CLS 

LET x=10: LET y=10 

IF x>21 THEN LET x=21 

PRINT AT x,y;"X" 

PAUSE 0: LET a#=INKEY* 

PRINT AT n,yi" " 

00 TO 1300 

FOR k = l TD 30 

LET a=INT tRND*7)+l 

BORDER a 

NEXT k 

STOP 

IF a*=CHR* 



(114) THEN GO T 



a*=CHR* C103J THEN GO T 
a*=CHRt U18> THEN GO T 
a#=CHR* (100) THEN GO T 



aS=CHR* (102) THEN GO T 

TD 300 
REM north 
LET X=x-1 
GD TO 300 
REM east 
LET y=y+l 
GO TO 300 



5000 REM south * 

5100 LET x^k+1 

5200 GO TO 300 

6000 REM west 

6100 LET y=y-l 

6200 GO TO 300 

Line 100 and 20ft clear the screen and set up the X,Y co-ordinates at 

which the X will be printed. 

Line MO checks to make sure that the X does not run ol'f the bottom of 

the screen. If the variable X should contain a number which is more 

than 21, usually the last line on which you can print, ii is changed to 

equal 2 1 . 

Lines 310 to 500 produce movement and ask for the direction in which 

you want the X to move. Line 400 Us« a new type of input. INKEYS 

will look at the keyboard for an instant. If a key is being depressed it 

will rcpon ii io the computer. Unfortunately INKEYS does not wait for 

an input. To remedy that I have put PAUSE before it which will 

pause until a key is depressed. Using INKEY$ the key will be put into 

a$. Line 600 transfers control to the routine at 1)00 which finds the 

key which has been depressed. 

Lines 700 to 1200 is the Fire routine. Line 800 produces a random 

number between one and seven which is used as a border colour at line 

900. The program then STOPs at line 1200. 

Lines BOO to 1SO0 look at the character codes allowed by the keypad 

and if one matches with the input key, control is passed to one of the 

routines between 1800 and 6200 which update the X,Y co-ordinates. 

Line 1800 returns for more input regardless of whether or not a valid 

key has been pressed. 

Lines 3000 to 6200 are made up of four three-line routines. Those 

update the X,Y values and return to line 300 where the X chamcalcr is 

reprinted in its old position, the old X character being rubbed out by 

line 500. 



SINCLAIR USER AuguxWSS 



ss 



Entry Point 



continued from pagt 5S 

Guide then you will need the character 

set table on page 51. 

We will use the lower case repre- 
sentations of V, y, V, *d' and T. 
That makes it easier to program as you 
will not need to add the codes for CAP 
SHIFT — capitals — or SYMBOL 
SHIFT. The bst of codes is shown at 
the bottom of figure one. If you do not 
use the correct codes and accidentally 
go into CAPS mode you will find that 
the keypad does not work. 

The codes are installed between 
lines 1300 and 1700 in listing one. The 
line which the program control goes to 
will depend upon the key which you 
are pressing. If you press a key which 
is not acknowledged by the program 
the 'X f figure which has been put on 
the screen will not move. 

The fire button is treated in a diffe- 
rent manner from the direction keys. 
Its control is one of the reasons for not 
splitting the program into a series of 
subroutines. 

The heart of the movement routine, 
between lines 300 and 500, has two 
exit points. The usual exit is at line 
300 L Where the fire key is recognised a 
transfer of control is then made to line 
700 which contains the animation 
sequence when the bomb goes off. 

The animation routine, which starts 
at line 700, is novel as it randomises 
the effect. It uses the function RND 
which, on its own, generates a random 
number between zero and one. For 
instance, typing LET A = RND might 
put .12345678 into A. That is not 
much good to us for generating some- 
thing like a colour or BEEP sound 
which requires a digit not less than 
zero and not greater than nine. 

To generate a whole, integer, num- 
ber between one and range top the 

formula would be LET A -INT 

(RND* range top)+l. For instance 

LET A=INT (RND*5)+1 would 
give a number within the range 1 to 5. 
The INT in the formula means INTe- 
ger. It chops off the decimal part of a 
cumber and rounds the result down. 

The one to range top formula is 

used to randomise colours for the ex- 
plosion in the program. That is not all 
the RND function can do. In next 
month's article, we will be using it to 
design a pseudo-random maze. 

Back to listing one. If you have run 
the program and tried to move the *X' 
off the bottom of the screen you will 
have found that an error occurs and 
the program stops. You have exceeded 
the bounds of the display and, unlike 



the QL, the Spectrum will not keep 
track of a line or object when it falls 
off the display edge. 

The error will only occur, however, 
when you move the 'X' to the bottom 
of the screen. Try moving it to one of 
the other three sides of the screen. 
You will find that the 'X T gets to the 
edge of the screen and bounces off it to 
start back towards the centre again. 
The effect is yet another Spectrum 
screen enigma. 

Luckily we can use the effect to 
advantage in the example, as we only 
have to error trap the bottom of the 
screen so that the 'out of screen' error 
does not occur. The only way to do 
that is to have a line in the program, 
such as 300, which checks on the Y 
axis of the screen display and, if it is 
equal to, or more than, the screen 
boundary, halts all errors. 

One limitation of listing one is that 
the 'X' will wipe out anything which is 
in its path. You cannot have a user 
defined background such as a maze or 
a picture. You can, of course put up 
different background colours, using 
the PAPER function, but you could 








000 




KEY ACTION 


CODE 


r up 
B right 
v dawn 
d left 
f fire 


114 
103 
US 
100 
102 


Figure 1 Keypad and codes 





not have a permanent backdrop. 

The Spectrum comes to the rescue 
again, however, with a Basse function 
called OVER. Its argument, the num- 
ber which follows it, can either be a 
zero or one and it operates in a similar 
way to the INVERSE and FLASH 
functions. Typing OVER 1 will switch 
the effect on and typing OVER will 
switch it off again. 

Usually all objects are printed on 
the background of the screen but it is 
possible to add another layer. The best 
way to describe the operation is to use 
the analogy of an animated cartoon. 
Backgrounds are produced on card 
and the characters are painted onto 
transparent plastic sheets which are 
then laid over the background. When 
OVER is switched on the moveable 
character can be printed on iop of the 
background without destroying it. 



10 CLS 




20 FOR k=l TO 10 




30 PRINT "XXXXXXXXXX" 




40 NEXT k 




50 OVER It PRINT AT 1,1; 


"S- 


60 PAUSE B 




70 PRINT AT 1,1; "5" 




80 PAUSE a 




<?0 GO TO 10 




Listing 2 





Listing two shows the effect. First a 
small block of Xs are drawn as a back- 
ground using a FOR . . . NEXT loop. 
The OVER function is switched on at 
line 50, (OVER 1), and on the same 
line 'S* is printed over the *X' at co- 
ordinates 1,1. The PAUSE at line 60 
will hold the program until you press 
any key when it will continue. 

Line 70 produces an unusual result. 
You may think, from looking ai it, 
that another *S' will be printed at loca- 
tion 1,1 but the reverse is true. It will 
wipe out the original 'S' leaving the 
'X' in position. 

The disappearance of the character 
is due to the way in which the charac- 
ters are represented in memory when 
the OVER option is on. 

Two states are possible on the 
screen and ihese are represented as 
INK, or one, and no INK, or zero. 
Those two states flip over. For inst- 
ance, if you have a one, or INK state, 
the next time you apply an operation 
to that Location it will become a non- 
INK, or white, area — the one flips 
over to become a zero. 

The odd effect means that you do 
not have to use a PRINT statement 
and a space between quotes to make a 
character vanish. You can just switch 
OVER on and re- use the PRINT 
statement which causes the character 
to be displayed. 

You can now change the program to 
cope with any backgrounds you may 
wish to put behind the moving 'X\ 
You could design a screen using one of 
many screen designer packages on the 
market and then LOAD your effort 
using the SCREEN! function before 
you run the program. You could also 
change the 'X* into your own UDG 
and animate it in the manner ex- 
plained in the last article. Just remem- 
ber to add OVER 1 at the top of the 
program before you use it. 

Next month, as promised, I will be 
delving into the random number 
generator. I will also be showing how 
to generate massive random mazes. 

I will also look at sensible ways in 
which to structure a program and 
when you can eliminate GOTOs to en- 
hance the RL'Nning of a program. 



» 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



software 



FOR 



Spectrum, Am s trad, Commodore 64 & QL 

THE"STRONGE5T VERSIONS OF THE CLASSIC GAMES — from good retailers or by mail order 



H£ty 



STRONG - 100 tiron Wrr. 1 iCCl 1rt**-i 
mi»f intrl iisft— «1 

FAST n S sees lo It* highnt h-vHv Jll 

:■ tminrr* time* 
ft NETRATING- at tournament levels il 
iearrhe* *i teasl ? moves deep* rryinH n^rn 
ol thousand* <*' hit- :il iiIjy 
FRlfrnDUF - keep* you intcrmed ldc*l n » 
*W eupe« or as a Mlrx tar hrftinnttl 

1 : RODRIVt TO SAVf YOU TIMI 

£9.95 40K SPECTRUM 



* Save Game & Program la Microdrive 

+ On-screen tkx its lorlrjurndiTifnl realism 

+ Unique npw way cri wtlinj* hu.ndrr.xK nf levels 

* All play within tournament 1 imt» limits 

FEATURES 

* Unkqur new *Jy nl vhinx Inrdl by Iknc g>VM you 
total control with Ihrec difierenl oplkms : Ml the 

comportr 1o match your rr>pon 1 ^ tjfnw, ^ivr il a hrnr 
Innii to pi | H in jv<"jw i. iiv BO it i.ike its 

moves. And you cm Inrrr il In play in hctl mow 
hmnit m ikt 

* Change udes and levels dunng pUy if requ.rpd 

* Stop tor sarnr *ral < h,m|c«. poMfuM M .my lime 

* Si* up pjnn uij* games you wart to try a any stage 
+ Will recommend your best move whrn .MrH 

* ( .in be M in -il> i' pmbfcffn) up in mate in inn 

* Extensive library ojI opening moves 

* Of* ion In rirtrrmini- x n i 

canon 

* Vou can play Wi"*rf(olH rhess 

* Abwil-.iir'k , i.iln'ftir begimii'i, .u-.i w rlw minimum 
move lime 

* Fascinating wHf-pJ,«y. mufje lor vnu Kmutly the sljiw 

* TOTAL INFORMATION about the computer's thought 
processes, irxfudingc best iirw tjf play lounrf mi Ijr. 
nuiTibm of positions evaluated, depth nr search, Internal 
scoring system, drsplay of previous movrs if nrouirpd. 
help menu if yuu snowld ™ g« fnJC* 



1 


}NGES1 

4« 


5# 




a 


J 1 ■ * 
1 ■ 


J 


e 


HI ^^ 


m 




^■SfCggPM , 



i f\ n/f GAfVfl i If i HfSS 



BRIDCE TUTORS with lull m.inn.il g m 
runrh Ir* n»ach you the gam? 
Beginners I5.9S Advanced £5 Si 
SPECIAL OFFER 
Bridge Ptayrr 1 & both lulors tl9.« 



£9.95 48K SPECTRUM 

WITH EXTENSIVE MANUAL 



* I" 



iv j ' rjli-.|i<. gameol ' bndRe JKdl'H (he- 



ft Computer car play as dpfemln or declarer 
At last, hierip is ,1 program Wliri i-vrfylhinx |Th> mjIo 
Bridge Player evet rtasded. Thi- (rimpuKf 
RCTKraEtS tdiidom h.nd». allinvs's proper hirk' 
iht ACOL sysivjm inrluding the Skyman arid 
Blac kwrxid convpntionj, ,ind lh«fl IT TAKES fOU 
ON. pkayinjj both your iJf3jM>fK»nt>.' haritJv 1 1 

fpflhjre thai cjo be rutkmr imo ihc Spedrum h.^ 
been irKluded rn rhm pn^rarn m gK* von .1 neallv 
satisfying artd enjoyable t^me of computer 
Bridge, 

FEATURES 

* Versatile tawldmg rtmmwv ^vrywu a wodhy opponent 

|m,.| nnirrii.il l,h i!.". .ili.w ''-iHrtdinfi 
and rpp|j\inn u) jny hand 

* Vou can review the btddinflur ijIjv iih rm-vMHn n 
while piaymft a fund 

*fjr inpulahandof {orm ■ i.tteH 

* COMPREHENSIVE ON-SCW EN Ifvif ORMATKJN 
OlSPtAyS; contract, tncki won mi I.ii <anK ptayed In 
•. uftt.ru ikini I jv tri< k --> 

* -■ ".i HAS THE EHAL ',..•',.■ ,i*. j«t yoof 
furfnt-r" mrm- hijih rjrrj prnnN ,1 >tnJ pn<ef to p, ■ 

declarer 

A REAILV STXONC OPPONENT 
FO« A REALir (.OCHJ f^MI Of BRIDGE 



<Vfiv 



cp : it i 



^:^»««^ ,n '" 


* 


ASTRONOMER 


• ♦ 


J 


a 1 


J 



THKIttlM. • nnnrjnd uvv i 

- rmvpiif pjate on earth 
SFRIOL'S UdI lr>r "nV jrrvUwr asfntjnomrr 
ulual 

•fnxilcf prow 

■ r-nt/Vv 

CRASH Oct I SB4 

£9,95 48K SPECTRUM 



Aslrartomer hm everythms in ore powfrtnl 
pruH! am , See ihe ntghl sky ol more than 1 000 

strfrs Irum jnv timi 1 (H pEjcfon edrth. v\\il< I'; il 
pint thf pi.irwh ur dr.tw m thp t onsM'lUfn ins Inr 

SrW cJose-ups horn the St,tr Atlas of 362 
ihiirf.. vV.itchdriim.rted det.iil erf otif Sd.it "■■. 
m motton jnti ice how H changes whti ihf 

rnonlhs. t jkulalPFVPrythinnnt'ctJCTj lor wmiju*. 
.istrornimy lo a hi«h st.ind.trd n( accuracy .incl 
produce your owii obka 1 1 save having n i tuiv- 
irem. Anylhirtg can be lransn?ned lo a ZX F' 



PEATURfK 






* '— frrrtimMVi' hdinu 

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* •■ Ski views from anywhere on earth 

* ' SIMS 

* Disp ■ 10 ;lan 

* t)r,iwv thr [Dnvkillainns on ymur cofimanil 

* Pltiu rhe wjldr ^v««rn an the night sky 

* Oupc Star Alia 1 - tor derailed study 

* mcitlon of tSt *oux fyttern 

■*■ Calculates pavl'iin ha ' ■ a, Planets. Comets 

■ ^^If^rwdv 

* Then plots them on the Night Sky or Star Chart 

'■*-, ■ ,1 1h<.. mnon 

* The dtstanc? iiurti earth at any . 

+ ■SkxtcjI l<mc d«J nting and setting limes 
« '"inr-rii in Piruv p n er a w antl [mnt >iili 
+ fu!ly<ompalibte iv-lh ZX Pointer 



"oRCOMMS^ 



6*< 




NEW FOR OTHER 
COMPUTERS 



■ ■id sound 
mie the feel • pirvuble. 

fxinusMDirs ,snd Cre* 



i rn,<,j(nt that a 



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fTrrrvement fa n 

PI f.:.( INAl tXJMPtnili GArVffiS 

ANY SPECTRUM— £5.95 
COMMODORE B4— £6.95 



AMSTRAD — Bridge Player £9.9.1 
Pinball £8.9.1 
Draughts £8.9.1 
Backgammon £8.91 
COMMODORE — Bridge Player £9.9.1 
SINCLAIR Ql. — Bridge Player £18.91 



/N/FIV 



|!50R< 
■*Q% KtlCRODRIVl 
COMfATIBU 



,i*i ISO IB ■•■ 500^ MlCfiODKfVE COMRATIBI LrTY this has so hf rbr uRrmaM S[km mim 

Ait It gives you the powrr to do rveryfhintt v Y, n .iIw.iva il^.-.i^ieil hi vnljhyoui Sjum'iuiii hi vt'ui own 
r ivVC pmgrjfirs. Uorn «( Ihe earl«H Supercodes (which ihemselVes mcemed 5 blar rrvH-w>,i wi- can 
■ ;.|idencelnal mte have packed absolurcly rvrrvthins mm rj •<■ An drvrtiifinit.iii Wnfi 

'Wftiiij ■ " i Iransiws Msily H -n rt.xiriw .nni is fKOjpiispd hy Sine Inr ds ful ly compatible i'lieech no 
"lawTedge to opeiate and comes with a compmfwniivr manual 

FEATURES 

I L'nique Access Program lets you INDEX' IIST TESTTAH OR RUN RFIOCATT SAVF ftp Mpe ... 
fBtcrodme with new or drfou* namrJ .VTBIFT juTnmjfii jlh 

* Dplinn* in. luO> tXAMPLt REPE.AT JUMP AGAINCONT Ifr OEMO 
OlAGNOSIS.lHOVf 

* lOfS menu Hrfim wflh rm.umri ItJinlni * BftlHaftt user manual 
< gtmtirvrt gkurjnleed SHORTEST AND FASTEST ha all applkatkom 



K» IIMPHMTLUDf 

Vl*W s*CRiir*lvFi'»T*i. X.nt TK.WI am JSk pthM pmniin ifxrdu SCKEfN COMfSESSfOli ^DVIraTLIHfS 

KiTI mULJlU- OUttni f» KJ JJ *n[1 MtCHtSbefSt eCkjhHH IIM HI!***. C43Tn-TH{ 5tj«rHIINLJSiaE« 

Aks rmyttiiiiiL'i v'Si^it . m s-ii|isi: iSMKH STOSC Itir'lALl rv*tf rill 1 SuKtIB P*i. >CKV*wuiIl4 

-IPWI SOtl!SiPSMIjSC-CC»JFlJH.llhlCC*IFL.^( |SIWt, KFMkll- FKix;itA« 

aXT^IiC-Cll^^i;' fflOCH^W. *M*USF MIH»I-VM SCTWnt«-r:HMr4rnn9rVLlHSCItAHll.ErlNV'[i|l' 

milUIJBJI •■"■■' CMAIIACTB ,|1 [Sa*t FLASH* PUGH1 CMhOfnmOr visv.Hi'. ms 

nUUW> IIVCIH tlHl .IM - Mf*OBV f RASSffll WCCIFV • ^PPFMO [ LUIStK ■ MKEtS WyE. , lt)^[lfVVVlK , > 

\ t^K*/mu^jt^H tmx - -■■; .cmtill daw*l cwci iNk.PAPrB chakc* 

..'■■ L^vtRT.BEWT I*Pf H[q[l Bf APFB ■ PRCX^IUlfcl PWtJTHl -PHt K.K.SM HKEA* IN 
iCMWdFSS «l( CnEATIAUTrMlrN EitjOt ■ P«rjC«A« *■ MUM T**t COflH Clfft*T VKTSnOtUHt 

, dimxchiS f^si JK.D mii:r<h>siv[ sime sa« MJCunrsivf <nvi ?o MrimoiMivEHJirE e:lc»e.'.. 

SC.S rPHOCIt*.** CASE CHANCLtWl>P'MiK LOaOE* - *S 'ilTSI mEmORV HhiE ArJ^■ltF^^ 

• U Lit* HUNTING lOWH 5CFWFH m ntw nrx: pwx:bammafil r BO«CKH 
tlufrvt CfltClllK-IIIPRF.imrTTEIlSflM3LLVI.nl StltaJLL rlll(lSftH^ftM:rHy*nK .1 

« <.HI WITH OR Wl FHCK.lT WRAPARlXiMd. I" A USfH CIFFINFn W1MK1W 
(.* ANY Sl2t IH'N' « Hitn tNCAHFRFOMKI SCEL((M-SP1HTE IFF EC'TV IMl nuflv IIHnbHHIH 



Watch this space lor Brand new Programs coming this Autumn 

WANTED: SUnn^-iral original pqgr.tiTTS ot *n Irnriftgci II laturcfaf any ollht 1 above 
comrxrters, Tcip myalties paid by this reliable lompdnt 



OTHER E-ROCRAMS tiw «k Spectrum 

Toolkit Urffily - (AUAT£9,95> 

SUPERCODE II 

FLOATING POINT FO«TH (wrthwliroh 

INTEGER FORTH 

EXTENDED 8AStC 

ssaii I ncjo iTurtle graphics) 

SPECIAL OFFfR any two uf Ihcse Invaludblv 
prottramminK dids 1(K £.1 7.95. 
Arty ihr(i' for £23.95 Ok £1 OFF any if you 
ySUPFKt OfJFIIlati 12.95. 



JUPITER ACESUPERCHESS 



£S.9S 



Ousk Garnet 

Othdkiipuvvprhjll ££.95 

Airtjdst.' In . .-k?) ES.9S, 
( iolt ins W'rvr Id (h«t« th,irv 1'n- .: mi's 

> , CKJ see heauiiy adverti ^pd i £5.95 

Draughts I very strong program] £5.95 

Bat k.gdiriman lextdlwitj £5.95 

Vavif £4.95 BridpPby*: £».9S 

Syperrhp-,-. £9.9S 

SPECIAL OFFER Any two ebsste games 

£1.50 OFFOR£l OFF ii vim buy wilhiini'tn 

out m.'M fedluwd prog/iims at £S Vi 
( Astrcjoorrspt, Hi-icIrp J or Suppicbp-. 



£12.95 4BK SPECTRUM with extensive manual 



MAILORDER 

Simply stale which prci$>r,irTis *nd send cheque, postal order or Access number (with e , 
date). Telephorie for itrstanl credil-c ard orders. Send SAE lor LataloflLrf and niurn [xiMd#> tnr 
siubmitted progfani^ 

CP SOFTWARE, Dept (SU8), 10 Alexandra Road, 
Harrogate, North Yorks HC1 5JS 

Tel; (0423) 17089 

DELIVERY I Ji m n uvt-sl txist Ptfil Iree irt UK. Europe add » lp ijct pruKram. Ali other litis dtii 1 1 
|JH i iri.ii!t.biTl tot sunjee Hun! ■ ■ add LJ inr InrJ pmu/iirn .ind IT Inri'.irn .srldrBonrfj, 












Since the dawn of the 
computer age the prices of 
home computers have been 
steadily falling. 

But remarkably, the price 
of a genuine, full-blooded disk 
drive has remained almost 
constant. 

Constantly expensive. 

Youll be lucky to pick up a 
decent one for less than £200 
in the shops. 

Now, however, you can 
have one delivered to your 
doorstep for only £119.95 (in- 
cluding VAT and postage and 
packing). 

The new Triton Quick Disk 
from Radofin. 

Its specifications are every bit the equal 
of a £200 disk drive, as a glance at our card 
above will confirm. 

Quick Disk uses the very latest tech- 
nology to store up to 100K on high quality 
Hitachi Maxell double-sided 2.8" disks. 

Its disk operating system (DOS) uses 
standard commands so it is truly easy to use, 
as any computer novice will be glad to hear. 

While the price will be 
compatible with most wallets, 
there is aTriton Quick Disk com- 
patible with most computers 
-Commodore 64, Spectrum 
(16K, 4SK and Spectrum plus), 
Aquarius, Dragon 64 and all 
MSX Systems. 

And h naturally included is 
an interface box plus all con- 
necting cables and instruction s. 

In short what we deliver 
is a complete, genuine disk 
drive, Not a tape or wafer in 
sight All for only £119.95. 

And when it comes to 
speed of loading, the Triton 
Quick Disk more than lives up 
to its name. 



SPECTRIN 
APPRECIATE THE! 




FROM TO READY IN 7 SECONDS. 

To put the Triton Quick Drive through 
paces we used an ordinary computer gam* 
-Jet Set Willy. 

From tape it took 170 seconds to loac 

When loaded from theTriton Quick Dis^ 
it took a mere seven seconds. That is 16; 
seconds less than the tape and certainly as 
quick as most disk drives on the market. 



^HJMMM^H 



AS A WALLE1 
APPRECIATE 





JM USER YOU'LL 
i SPECIFICATIONS 




TRIT 

QUICK 



ts 

le 

d. 
sk 
53 
is 



Proof indeed that the Triton has all the 
capabilities of its more expensive rivals. 

AS TEST DRIVEN BY THE EXPERTS. 

New it may be, but the Triton Quick Disk 
is already receiving rave reviews in the com- 
I puter press. Por example, in a recent Home 
Computing Weekly article it picked up their 
[much coveted "Flipped" award. 

As their journalist said *.... I am very 



impressed by the Quick Disk 
Not only is it very quick, and 
both smaller and neater than 
other drives, but it's easier to 
use as well... the Quick Drive 
performed faultlessly 

Its easy to use and at 
around £120 is probably the 
best buy for the first time user- 
High praise indeed for any 
disk drive. 

For one costing £80 less 
than any comparable piece of 
equipment it's exceptional. 

HOW TO BUY YOUR TRITON 

QUICK DISK. 

As yet you won't find the 

Triton Disk Drive in any shop. 

You can only lay your hands 

on one by filling in the coupon below. 

Send it along with a cheque or P/O for 
£119.95 to, Radofin Electronics (UK) Ltd., 
Hyde House, The Hyde, London NW9 6LG. 
(Postage free in the UK Add additional post- 
age for outside the UK) 

In the unlikely event of you being in 
any way dissatisfied, simply return the disk 
drive and we'll happily return your money 



ttaUTraiwwl Rata 
TOOK Bit ,'S*t. 

Fite Load Hate: 

Diskettes. \ 

Miemflft KJO* Bites \ 
Fwmaned 20 Sectors,' ', 



iTUSER YOU'LL 
fETHE PRICE. 



TRITOH 

QUICK DISK. 



r 



n 



Please send me a Triton Quick Disk 
for £119.95 

My computer is a 



2 8" Diskettes at 



TMT*n 

QUICK DISK 




Please include 

£2.99 each. 

I enclose a cheque^postal order for 

Total 

Make cheques payable to:- 
Radofin Electronics (UK) Ltd.. 
and post to us at Hyde House, The Hyde, 
London NW96LG. Tel. 01-205 0044 



Name. 



Address. 



Tel: No.. 



L_ 



Please el\ovv 26 days fqf delivery. 



SU 



IT'S GIVEN UP the ghost. You're 
tearing your hair out, practically 
climbing up the walls trying to get 
the damn thing to function but 
NOTHING WORKS. 

What can you do? Chuck it out of 
the window? Thump it? Kick it? 
You're more likely to curse aloud and 
start poking its insides around — but 
don't. Although it's tempting to go for 
it with the soldering iron, you'll prob- 
ably do more harm than good. People 
messing about with their micro's in- 
nards are half the reason third party 
maintenance companies are in busi- 
ness at all. 

But once your micro is in the hands 
of those people, what will they do to 
it? Will you get your money's worth? 
And how long will you have to wait? 

Advice from the maintenance com- 

Nothing is more 
useless than a 

blown Spectrum. 

Wendie Pearson 

finds gold at 

the end of the 

soldering iron 

panics is Loud and clear — leave the 
messing around to the experts, or 
you'll be sorry. Not only do they have 
machines admitted to their sick rooms 
ah choked up and covered in biscuit 
crumbs, coke and lemonade, but there 
is also evidence that many users fancy 
themselves as amateur surgeons and 
completely wreck their machines. 

Verran Computer-fix in Camberley 
runs an insurance scheme in conjunc- 
tion with the Domestic and General 
Insurance Company in Wimbledon. 

Verran has a First Aid Plan cover- 
ing all home computers with pre- 
miums based on the machine's value. 
Micros worth up to £150 cost £16.60 
for a 12 month guarantee covering 
fire, theft and damage. Machines 
worth between £150 and £299.99 cost 
£22.60 for the same cover and the QL, 
at under £600, would be £30.60. On 
the peripherals side, a printer worth 
£300 would be covered for £29,60. 

The company is run by commercial 
manager, Laurence FritweU who says, 
"Computer-fix is the biggest computer 
services company in the world, with 
branches in France, Spain and Ger- 
many. It's an advantage to work with 
an insurance company as it gives a 




Company more credibility." 

FritweU says their Superfast repair 
service wUl tum machines around 
within seven days, subject to availabil- 
ity of spares. 

"Our prices include postage and 
transit insurance. It's a fast and direct 
repair and we have a comprehensive 
range of computerised test equipment 
to see what's wrong with a machine 
when it arrives." 

Like every other maintenance com- 
pany we talked to, FritweU says the 
main preventable problem is plugging 
an interface into the Spectrum while it 
is still on. That does ghastly things to 
the FCB. "It's rare that we have an 



irreparable machine, hut people do 
horrific things to them," he says. 
"One person put 240 vohs down the 
ear and microphone socket and that 
sort of thing blows every chip on the 
board/' 

Eric Allen, marketing manager of 
Domestic and General says, "We 
don't take on people from outside the 
UK. It is very complicated, as you 
have to conform to the individual 
country's regulations. If a foreign user 
approached us, we would refer them 
to repair agents here." 

D & G operate various schemes 
through a number of companies in- 
cluding RCS Computer Services in 



60 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



Maintenance - 



Felrham, who deal with Acorn 
machines, and John Menzjes. They 
also run a general scheme called Com- 
puter Care. Thar is available through 
various retailers although, oddly, Dix- 
ons, Boots and Currys will not do it, 
"They haven't seen that there is a 
market need for it," says Allen. Slap- 
ped wrists for all three! 

Computer Care is taken out within 
30 days of purchasing your micro and 
costs £12.60 a year for a micro worth 
under £150, giving you a one year 
extension to your guarantee. If you 
want to extend it for four years, it 
costs £25.60. 

D & G are covered by the Depart- 
ment of Trade & Industry so that 
policy holders are protected by the 
1976 Policyholders Protection Act. 
That safeguards the end user in the 



ture on the part of Mancomp. The 
company has a multilingual member 
of staff who speaks German, French 
and Italian and helps specifically with 
overseas enquiries, which account for 
a fair proportion of its business. 

There is no set price for repairs. 
"We try to be flexible, depending on 
the problem. The minimum price is 
£9,00 and the maximum £23," says 
Bhait. "We will repair things while 
people wait — all they have to do is 
phone and we'll advise them on their 
problem. If it turns out that they 
should come in, and are near enough 
to do so, we make an appointment and 
give them a quote as to the repair 
price. It's up to them whether they 
wish to proceed. 

"There's no shortage of repair com- 
panies, but our reputation helps us 



Down but 
not out 



event of a third party maintenance 
company going into liquidation. If 
that happens, you then have redress to 
the British Insurance Association 
which deals with claims of that sort. 

It seems , however, that few people 
insure their micro when they first buy 
it. "Most people don't take out a 
policy until the thing breaks down," 
says Fritwell. "At the same time, it's 
like any other insurance policy and the 
reason more people don't insure their 
micros is that they're often unaware 
that there is a breakdown policy of this 
kind available." 

One company there to help when 
your Spectrum gets sick is Mancomp 
Ltd, based in Manchester and run by 
Mike Bhatt. Of all the repair compa- 
nies Sinclair User spoke to, this one 
seemed the most professional when it 
came to advice and a helpful attitude. 

Bhatt is insistent that anyone with a 
problem should phone him at his 
premises, tucked away between Man- 
chester City Centre and Stockport. He 
is happy to give all the advice he can 
over (he phone. 

Mancomp runs bilingual ads with 
hall in German. That caters for over- 
seas readers and is a considerate ges- 



rather than anything else," he says. 
"We will bust a gut trying to repair a 
machine and will never reject one 
unless the damage is phenomenal." 

Bhatt's basic advice goes as follows, 
"Don't keep anything metallic or li- 
quid on the same surface as the micro, 
particularly near the Spectrum's rear 
end, as it could go inside and short- 
circuit it. Also, keep all the leads tidy 
as kids playing nearby can easily pull it 
off the table and wreck it." 

Bhatt says repairing it yourself can 
often result in small hairline cracks in 
the Spectrum bodywork, and little 
bubbles of solder can be left behind 
which fall into the Spectrum's innards 
making it short-circuit. That will re* 
suit in lots of problems ; so that you 
won't know what is wrong. 

The only micro Mancomp has 
been unable to take so far is the QL, 
due to the shortage of spares, although 
Bhatt has not been short of queries on 
this machine. At the time of writing, 
Preston -based distributor CPC was 
expecting its first big delivery of QL 
spares which it will distribute to in- 
terested third party maintenance 
companies — just in time for all those 
QLs coming out of warranty towards 



the end. of the year. 

Those based near Coventry may 
care to try Quantum, at the City 
Arcade Shop who do all Sinclair re- 
pairs including Interface 1, micro- 
drive, ZX-81, 16K RAM pack, Spec- 
trum ZX Printer, Spectrum and QL 
— once parts are received. Repairs are 
done on the premises and a Spectrum 
repair will set you back about £20 
including VAT and parts while a 
ZX-81 repair is £2.50 cheaper. 

"If more than £10 worth of spares 
are necessary, we'll do a written esti- 
mate for the customer", says manager 
Glen Lloyd, who finds thai most sick 
Sinclair machines arrive in the school 
holidays. 

Lloyd is irritated by magazines 
which teach readers how to build 
things like interfaces. "Unless you've 
done a lot of building, you stand a 
good chance of wrecking your compu- 
ter," he says. "Some customers think 
they're experts when they're not. 
They go around connecting strange 
things to the Spectrum, like home- 
made edge connectors" 

The culprit, it seems, is that omi- 
nous httle wafer of plastic that goes 
vertically down the edge connector. If 
that bit falls out you can easily stick 
the plug into the wrong hole. 

The machine will be damaged un- 
less it is switched off within seconds 
— ■ so be warned. "We recommend 
that you glue the plastic in place to 
stop this happenings" says Lloyd, 

Another common problem is the 
membrane underneath the Spectrum's 
'dead flesh' keyboard. That becomes 
brittle with age and use and is likely to 
need replacing at some point. 

Although the company does not 
concentrate on education, they do 
Coventry City Council's repairs and 
they're popular with US customers 
too. Users of the old Timex can get it 
to perform like a Spectrum if they 
have a Sinclair ROM to go inside* so 
Quantum do those mail order. 

Ishtiaq Hussain at Luton's Cbiltern 
Repair Centre bases his service on 
'speed and reliability' — two things he 
feels Sinclair lacks. "Sinclair would 
probably charge you more, and our 
service is quicker," he says. ,L We turn 
machines around within three to five 
days." 

Thai is certainly better than Sinc- 
lair's efforts on a 10 working day 
turnaround system, charging £30 
compared wiih HuSsain's £18. 

Again, plugging in peripherals 

continued on page 64 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



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THETFORD MICROS 

SPECIALIST IN SPECTRUM REPAIRS 



21 Guildhall Street, 

Thetford, 

Norfolk, 
Tel: (0842)61645 



Service Department 

Unit 4, Leyland Close, 

Thetford, Norfolk, 

Tel: (0842) 65897 



Why wait weeks to get your Spectrum repaired 

We at Thetford Micros (Service Dept) have just put into operation a new fully equipped workshop to allow us to keep up 
our 24 Hours "Guaranteed" repair service on your Sinclair Spectrum computers. We have fully trained staff and our 
workmanship and repair work is fully warranteed to give your the confidence that you micro is in the safest hands Any 
first time repairs will be £16.00 + VAT + £2.00 postage and package - total £20.40 for any repair on your computer 
We also specialise in the repair of the Spectrum microdrive, Interface I, II and ZX printers at the same standard charge 
Payment maybe made by cheque, Barclaycard, Access, American Express, or Posiai Order. So all you have to do is 
post your faulty Spectrum to us aiong with payment and we will do the rest, your repaired Spectrum will be back in the 
post within 24 hours (we never sleep!) and depending on the post office it will be back with you within 5-6 days We have 

already undertaken repairs from all over England and the continent. 

IrVe also undertake repair wofk on Acorn, Commodore, Amstrad, Texas, Dragon etc., at the lowest of prices. 

Any problems with your micro phone Pete on the above telephone numbers - I'll be only too pleased to assist. 

We also produce our own Spectrum "48K Upgrade Kits" complete with fitting instructions 

£24,00 (VAT+P&P) inclusive. 

Swftchable UHF — composite video can be fitted to your Spectrum for oniy £14.00+ VAT +£2.00 P&P. 

Trade enquiries welcome 



62 



SINCLAIR USER August !9SS 



A 






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S3 Maintenance 



tonnnmd from page 61 

while your Spectrum is on was Hus- 
sain's main warning, combined with 
messing about with your machine. 

Meanwhile, if you are stationed in 
the depths of Norfolk, MP Electronic 
Services in Dereham is a good bet. A 
ZX-81 repair is £12.50 including six 
month's warranty, while Spec trams 
cost a straight £20 all-in. The com- 
pany also does modifications to power 
supplies and ULA circuitry, 

"About SO percent have been 
damaged by users, by the 'power on' 
phenomenon. There are Jots of mem- 
ory failures and CPUs getting dam- 
aged by users," says service manager 
Alan Jackson. 

The bulk of MP's foreign custom 
comes from the RAF and WRAF in 
Germany — they do a lot of work for 
the forces here, too, so most of the 
work comes through recommenda- 
tion. 

Having heard more than a few 
complaints about Sinclair, we turned 
to them for their comments. Official- 
ly, repair time is 10 working days from 
the date Sinclair receives your burnt/ 
broken offering. Asked about the long 
delays, spokesman Julian Goldsmith 
says, "If you consider that there are 
one and a half million Spectrums in 
the UK, even if you handle 0.1 per- 
cent of them, that's still a lot, especial- 
ly considering that things get lost in 
the post etc," 

Commenting on independent 
maintenance companies, he says; "If 
those people are more local and conve- 
nient for people, fine. Hie only prob- 
lem is if it's done by people who aren't 
properly qualified or who use the 
wrong parts. It's like putting one star 
petrol in a Rolls Royce." 

Goldsmith says he is unaware that 
people are having problems getting 
spares for the QL and that "they 
wouldn't need them anyway," as most 
are still in warranty. 

Although the one year warranty still 
stands, you will not get your Spectrum 
replaced by Sinclair after it has gone 
more than one month into its warran- 
ty period, as Sinclair has had problems 
with users "seeking to get a new 
machine at the end of its life and 
generally taking advantage of the re- 
turn system." 

If the hardware has been tampered 
with in any way during the warranty 
period, you invalidate the warranty, 
but the upgrade kit which lets you 
turn your Spectrum into a Spectrum 
Plus, by attaching a keyboard, is an 



exception to that. Goldsmith says 
Sinclair will do this for you if you do 
not feel happy about DIY. 

Sinclair charges £30 for a Spectrum 
repair out of warranty and will charge 
a horrendous £60 for the QL. If you 
have a bust ZX-81, forget it, "You can 
buy them for about £20 from Boots or 
elsewhere so I don't think we'd bother 
mending it," says Goldsmith. 

Video Vault at Glossop, Derbyshire 
has a computer which checks each 
micro coming in for repair. Riad 

"the message is 

that independent 

companies are not 

only faster than 

Sinclair but 

cheaper too 



tf 



Kassar, managing director, says, "We 
put a connector onto the circuit board 
of the customer's micro and it reads 
the board to find the fault. Many 
customers have messed about with 
their machines and have put the 
wrong components in," 

Video Vault turns over 400 
machines a week and has a claimed 
success rate of 95 percent. Not only is 
it good to find a company which 
admits it is not 100 percent perfect 
but it also gives you a free game with 
your repair so you can test out your 
Spectrum to see if it has been mended 
properly. Jolly Roger, a graphic 
adventure worth £6.00, was written by 
the company and uses all 48K of the 
Spectrum memory. "We have a thor- 
ough checking system and we even 
put new rubber feet on if they're 
missing." Cute, eh? 

A security seal is put on each 
machine afterwards so that if it is 
returned a second time, the company 
can see whether someone has tam- 
pered with it. If the seal is intact, the 
machine will be repaired again. 

Spectrums are fixed for £19.95 in- 
clusive and they do Spectrum Plus 
upgrades for £30 plus postage and 
packing. A repair and upgrade is 
£49.95. 

At TV Services in Cambridge, man- 
aging director, Ben Done charges 
£18.75 for Spectrum repairs, £11.50 
for ZX-81s and £19.95 for I6K RAM 
packs. They will also do QL and 
microdrive repairs once spares are 
delivered and are happy to repair for 
foreign users, 



Meanwhile, beyond the bracken 
and heather MicroServ in darkest 
Denny, Scotland, is doing its stuff. In 
fact, Sinclair had better watch out if 
manager Jim Lynch keeps to his 
expected price for QL repairs — 
estimated at £20 plus parts, post- 
age and packing, making a likely price 
of around £30. Spectrums cost £20 
and ZX-81 s £15 and both prices are 
inclusive, "We'd give an estimate over 
the phone but not a definite quote 
until we'd seen the machine/ and 
there's a three month warranty on 
each repair." Spectrum repairs take an 
hour while you wait or 24 hours if 
posted. 

Overall, the message seems to be 
that independent companies are not 
only faster than Sinclair but cheaper 
too, in addition to giving a more 
personal service. 

Users wanting to keep their ZX-81* 
in good nick will find them useful, and 
it is worth deciding whether to insure 
your micro through one of the com- 
panies mentioned or take pot luck 
with one of the other companies. 
Many advertise in Sinclair User and 
the list below is only a fraction of the 
outfits in existence. 

One reader did have problems with 
a service company based in Birming- 
ham. After continual problems trying 
to get his Spectrum fixed by the com- 
pany, the reader eventually got some 
joy at Computer-fix instead. 

We would like to hear your experi- 
ences of such companies first hand, so 
if you have any comments on the 
subject, or any friends who have used 
them, do write to us at Sinclair User. 



Where to go 

Verran Gorttpuicx-fti Services, Unit 2H & 
21, Albany Park, Frimlcy, Cam bet lev, Sur- 
rey, Tel: 0276-66266 

Domestic & General Insurance Company, 
Swan Court, Manse) Road, London SW19. 
Tel: 01-946 7777 

Mancomp Lid, Prim works Lane, Leven- 
shulmc, Manchester M19 3JP Tel: 061-224 

its* 

Quantum, 33 City Arcade, Coventry. Tel: 

020 3-24632 

Chiltern Computer Centre , 76b Dailow 

Road t Luton, Bedfordshire, Tel: 0582- 

455684 

MP Electronic Services, The Laurels, 

Wendlinfc, Dereham, Norfolk. Tel: 0362- 

87327 

Video Vault, 140 High Street West, (,l ... 

sop, Derbyshire, Tel: 045-74-66555 

TV Services, Cheston Mill, Frenches Road, 

Cambridge, Tel: 0223-358366 

MicroServ, Unit 4 t Denny Workspace, 

Currunbank Crescent, Denny, Scotland. 

Tel: 0324-823468 



64 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



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SINCLAIR 
COMPUTER REPAIRS 

Why risk expensive repair charges? 

Send your faulty machine to the company that tells ycm lis prices m advance 
And guarantees the quality ol its workmanship 

Look at lh«sa prioeal 

ZXSpeclrtifri..,,, „ ,. JJW( „„„.„Ei6.00 

ZX81 „ „ „ E12.00 

■"' DflY FTj^Pn t>..jj J t... JJ . t ^... 1 ; || i n |HWIIHtWH<W+tH irrrrrnnirrmiiii in Bill El ZiOU 

ZXIntarf«»1._ „.„™ C1800 

ZX Interface 2 , C13.S0 

ZX. Microdrive .„......, , — — _™„ m E17.50 

ZXPrlnlef,.... „ ^^^^^ £18.00 

ZX Spectrum 1 G-4SK Upgrade , „™.„„„ £25.00 

ZX Power Supptys (Replfleerr>ent^ r „ „ C9.9S 

These prices include Parts, Labour. Return PostaQe fiasund). VAl & Full Wwwity 

r 

For i last and reliable service , send machins , brief description ol fauli and cheque 
or postal ureter for the relevant amount to Ihe experts 

CAPITAL COMPUTER SERVICES 

Q»p"t SU, 44 Rich a Road, Cardiff. CF4 4 AA 
Tm\i (0222)614401 

For a year's peace- of nwfl 

EXTINDED WAHRANTTS 

* Tho Gold Service Repair Club * 

One year's membership to ltng popular schema for Sp*clfum o*n«rs costi orty 
E1B.95 and covers all repair charges (including relurn postage! for that period 

Membership is subiectto theccmrJilion thatyomr machine be <n perfect working 
order on enroime-nl (discount repairs available tu prospective members) 

Other tompanys will charge you this, much lor a tingle repair! 

Write or phoiw fc an application lorm 





iff- 



4 Games for the 
ZX Spectrum 



Order this new flASiC programming course fur 
Introductory price of just E9 95 and you will 
receive Ihesa 4 greal ijames absolutely FREE 



This new concept in computer education wilt take you 

beyond simple BASIC instructions, into the 

world ol the prolessbonais where you win learn 

Ihelr secret techniques It comes on cassette 

so you simply relax In from 

ol your television and 

watch and listen as 

we show you how to 

get the mosl 

Irom your 

micro. 




ATTRIBUTES 
PEEK b POKE 
PLOT & DRAW 
ANIMATED GRAPHICS 
PROGRAM STRUCTURE 
NIGH BBS. GRAPHICS 
FULL COLOUR & SOUND 
BftCTRUM HOLDINGS LTD 



Mans Cheque or Postal Order lor E9.95 payable to 
and send to: P &QX HH. CFtAWLCV, RH10 4FU 

Name 



f*0 BOX 104. CRAWLEY. RH10 4FU 

SPECTRUM MOLDINGS LTD 1 



ArfrfmH 




[Ek PROFESSIONAL 


PriBlrfirlH T*\- 


f® SOFTWARE 


Orders despatched within 7 days. 


BUB 



Orders dei 



rS6 



SINCLAIR USER Augiut mS 



D O M A R K 

presents 



• 






7, 





AVIEWtq A KILL 

the Computer Qame 



YOU will become 
James Bond 

his first arcade/adventure 

AVAILABLE NOW ON 

Spectrum 48K, Commodore 64, 

and watch out for 

Enterprise, Amstrad, 

MSX and others 

Domark Ltd . 204 Wotple Road, London &YY20 8PN. Tel: 01-947 5624 Telex: 894475 G 



r 




To Domark Ltd . 204 Worpie Road. 
London SW20 8PN 
DOMARK Telex: 894475 G 



ORDER VOUR COPY NOW! 



CALL 01-947 5624 .'5/6 



OFFICE HOURS ONLY 

NAME: {B1QCK LETTER S| , , , , 

ADDRESS , ....... 

COUNTY POSTCODE 

Please send me copies of "A View to a Kill - The Computer Game 1 

at E10.99 (includes postage and packing). 

I enclose a cheque/P.O forE ......... ..... 

My computer is: .„, „„ .„„.„.. 

You may order by Access D Visa D American Express D by post or 

telephone (01-947 5624/5/6) office hours only 

Please debit my CREDIT CARD Q Signature. 

Account No: 






Expiry Date: , SU3 



/ x r 





Business Software 



THE PROFESSIONAL TOUCH 




INCLUSIVE 



SPECTRUM 48K BUSINESS SOFTWARE 



The NEW Transform Keyboard transforms 
your Spectrum Into a fully operational 
professional machine 

■ WIH Incorporate both microdrive and 

power supply. 

• 65 keys including fullsize space bar. 

• Large ENTER key. 

• Full stop, comma, semicolon, colon, 
singfe delete, edit and cursor keys 

• ON /OFF switch with LED. 

• Easy installation — no soldering 

• Black metal case, 

• EMODE key 

' Its price reflects the kind of use to which it will be put. 
but It's certainly the top keyboard at the moment - 
SINCLAIR USSR, JUKI 1**4 



MONITORS 



BUSINESS PACK EU95p 

The suiie of programs, includes Sale* Day Book. 
Purchase Day Book and Business Bank Accounf 
These programs ore being used by Over 10QQ 
companies to produce VAT and annual account 
the Purchase and Bank Account progrartis allow 
for analyses under 17 subheadings The Sales 
programs produce statements of outstanding 
mvotces. Both Sale* and Purchase programs 
calculate VAT 

INVOICING £15Q0p 

This program will print ouf invoices, catculaies 
discounts and VAI The program will calculate 
total; from unit prices. Up to 50 accounts with 250 
outstanding Invoices 

SALES/ PURCHASE LEDGES IN VOIC ING £2 S, OOp 

This program is for use on microdrive or Opus Disc 
only The program will print an invoice using a 
built-in price fist and post the invoice to your 
customed} account. Will also print price list, 
statements, labels, etc 



WORDPROCESSING 



T AS WORD TWO by tasman £24,95p 

Tasword Two is a powettut word processing 
program that will perform all Ihe functions 

available on large processors Trie program will 
give you 64 characters per line on screen. 

TASPRINT by Tasman Software £9.9Dp 

Use this program with Tasword Two to produce 5 
different fonts on a dat matrix printer 



PAYROLL 



E19.95p 



PAYROLL by Byte One 

This payroll program will handle up lo 40 

employees ana will calculate NIC. PAVE, 

superannuation and many other deductions. This is 

a very user friendly program and ejctremeiy good 

value. 



STOCK CONTROL 



STOCK CONTROL E10-95p 

Handles 900 lines: including details of supplier 
Program has full search facilities enabling v qu to 
search and update all iines from one supplier 



DATABASES 



MASTERFILI by Campbell Systems £14 ?Sp 

This is one of frs besl database programs 
available for the ZX Spectrum Thrs program has 
many uses «i a small business 

SUPERFUE El4.95p 

This ts a new database program mot siores pages 
of text 6d columns x 22 rows The program includes 
word processing and full search facilities 

V NOTCH £1295p 

Index and Catalogue System, lor collections of 
photographs, recipes, boots. knitting patterns. 
stamps, etc Up k> 3500 items per file full search 
facilities 



SPREAD SHEET 



OMNI C A LCbv Microsphere KM 95p 

This Is Hie long-awaited mscro-dnve version of 
omnlicalc complete with histograms and many 
other features. 



BUSINESS GRAPHICS 



HISTO GRAPH E10 9Sp 

This program will enable you to present figures in 
histograms or pie charts. Displays 3 years as a 
direct comparison or 5 years to show a trend A 
unique feature of this program is thai oil the figures 
can be printed with the histogram 



All software Is supplied on canette. ir you nequJre any err 
the fcwnw DOCfc Or mvotCing progrcms sup0Ih*S on <*SC 
ptsae add EAGOp to the above ptiam 



ACCESSORIES 



Blank microdrive cartridges 


E1.99p 


Microdrive storage bones 


ES,95p 


RS 232 lead 


£11 50p 


Monichrome monitor connecior . . 


£11 50 p 


RGB monitor connector 


£ AS OOp 


CentTonlcs Interfoce 


E44.90p 


3Vs" floppy discs 


£4 flip 


Continuous Paper 20Q0 sheets 


El2,9ftp 


Continuous labels 1000 


£6 65 p 




UTILITIES 



DLAN by Campbell Systems £ 7,9 5 p 

Use your Spectrum to sell your products, Dion will 
display messages in up to 11 different typefaces 
wm scroll text In any direction. 

TASWIDE by Tosman Software ES.SOp 

Vou can use this program within your olher 
programs to display 44 columns on screen. 

MF-PRINT by Campbell Systems £6 ,95p 

Enables you lo set a print format for your full- sue 
printer within masterfife. Supplied complete with 
masterfile for £19.95 

TASMEflGE by asman Software E10-95p 

Allows you to transler data from Masterfile into 
Toswotd enabling you to use Tasword Tor mail 
merge. The program allows you to specify line and 
column of each field. For use on micro-drive only 

TRANSEXPRESS by Romantic Robol £9.95p 

Micro-drive utility program which will enable you 
to back-up all voor miero-dnve cartridges 

TASCOPY by Tasman Software E9.90p 

This program allows you to produce 3 s*zes of 
screen copy using Interface 1. 



Phillips Black and Green 
Kaga Taxan Black and Green 
Sinclair QL Vision .... . . 


C7&.00P 
E99 95p 

£299. OOp 


PRINTERS 


Centronics ''RS 232 interface 


E44.90p 


DOT MATRIX PAINTERS 
Brolher MJ009 
Epson IXflO 
Epson FX8Q .... 
Taxon Kaga KP81Q 


£163 ODD 
£199 OOp 
EJ24 OOp 
£2A0.00p 


DAISVWHEEL PRINTERS 

Smith Corona Tpl 
Brother HR1S 


ElftVOOp 
£3*9 OOp 



Telephone for prices on other punters Please add 
£5.00 delivery and VAT to both printers and 
monitors 



DISC-DRIVES 



Discovery 1 by Opus i7Sk 
Discovery 2 by Opus 360k 



£199 95p 
£329 95 p 



MAILING LIST. £14.95p 

This program will allow you fo quickly store and 
retrieve names and addresses from wttrwi 
ARCHIVE Features Include Stngle key functions, 
prints address labels, exports flies lo QumI for 
mailing Est; atso compatible with our stockcontroi 
file 

STOCK CONTROL. £14 95 p 

Keeps a complete record of all your slock rtems 
Including retail price, trade price, minimum order 
level, items on order and many other features 

INTEGRATED ACCOUNTS. £A9 95p 

This new program from. Sinclair will allow you to 
produce full profit and loss account 

PAYROLL. £*3.2Sp 

Calculates weekly, monthly or 4 weekly payroll fufi 
tax calculations, coin analysts and paymenl 
rounding. 



CENTRONICS INTERFACE 

RS232 LEAD 

MONICHROME MONITOR LEAD 



. . £29 95p 

. £10 OOp 

£S OOp 



TRANSFORM LTD (Dept. SU) 01 -658 6350 
24, West Oak, Beckenham, Kent BR3 2EZ 




Business Software 



Stock Manager 






THE TEDIOUS business of stocktak- 
ing may be at an end with an up-dated 
program from OCP. 

Stock Manager for the 48 K Spec- 
trum is designed to keep records of 
items held in stock and produce in- 
voices. There are now four versions 
available. The version reviewed here is 
for the SPDOS disc system. 

Compared with a loading time of 
around four and a half minutes for the 
cassette versions the SPDOS version is 
loaded automatically in just over 10 
seconds. 

The number of stock items handled 
by the program has also been in- 
creased from 600 items to 6300 on the 
SPDOS version. At extra cost, ver- 
sions for an S00K disc, handling up to 
17550 items, are available. 

Machine coding provides Stock 
Manager with almost instantaneous 
retrieval of data from memory. 
Although only 450 items are held in 
memory at any one time, details on 
any item from one to 6300, or even 
17550, can be displayed on the screen 
in under five seconds. 

Most printer interfaces for the Spec- 
trum require software to run them, 
OCP has provided software for 15 
interfaces in the program, 

When setting up the system the 
number of the first invoice, the name 
and address of the company, are 
entered. Once set up that name cannot 



be changed but the address can be. 

To set up the stock data the amend/ 
change option is selected from the 
main menu. The stock number, name 
— up to 25 characters — price exclud- 
ing VAT, whether VAT is chargeable 
and the stock level at which items 
should be recorded, are input. 

Unfortunately, a separate option, 
stock increase, must be used to enter 
the initial stock levels. A stock de- 
crease option is also given, Those 
options allow adjustments to be made 



control programs available - — re- 
viewed in the August '84 issue — the 
buying-in cost is not used. That is 
probably the easiest to use and has the 
advantage of producing invoices. 

The SPDOS system, with its faster 
loading and increased data nzc, im- 
proves an already excellent program. 
With OCP's backing, SPDOS should 
become the disc system for business 
users. 

Since this review was written, the 
SPDOS system has been bought by 



yfP^^JrnHE CLOSE 

[LONDON 
SkJl 3ftU 



22 n.iy 



1985 



PRICE yftUJE 



\uo. 



GOODS 
UQHINAL LEDGER 

DtSCOUWT SO* 



CUBE 



VALUE EXCL. 

taw y* T 



7.75 

IB. 75 

14.93 



VAT 



23*29 

44. si 

L00O.OO 

431 • 



vat] 

O-tiO 

$.&> 

B 4.7B 

fa. 73 

ISO. 00 

fait, 07 



-««i»-^!IL 



VAT 



3022 .90 
3455.-73 



«t-25 



so that the stock level is accurate. 

Both the invoice and price list 
options print the company name at the 
lop of the paper and its presentation is 
unusually poor. The items for the 
invoice are entered by their stock 
number. An excellent series of error- 
trapping routines ensures that you can 
rectify most mistakes. 

Unlike some of the other stock 



KempsTon and renamed KDOS. It 
has a tape-disk facility and is compat- 
ible with all SPDOS software, inclu- 
ding Stock Manager. 

Mike Wnghi 



Publisher OCP 77a Packharse Road, 
Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire 
5L9 8PQr*rie* £19.95 
+ + ** 



Classic 
Bookkeeping 



IF YOU run a small business, you 
might look at a new accounting system 
from Manx Tapes. 

Classic Book-keeping and Finan- 
cial Accounts is a 15-program pack- 
age for a 48 K Spectrum, single mic- 
rodrive and full -sized printer. It is 
supplied on two microdrive cartridges 
and a further five cartridges are re- 
quired for data and interim program 
storage. If back up cartridges are 
made then 14 cartridges are necessary 
to run the system. 

The manual is adequate. It does 
have its weak points and the section on 
installing the system leaves a great 
deal to be desired. 

The author appears to have been 
blinkered by the intricacies of book- 



keeping to the extent that the user is 
forgotten when it comes to providing 
the extra touches which make a prog- 
ram easy to use. 

The details needed to install the 
system are contained in four prog- 
rams. To use a different part of the 
install option, an error is forced to 
stop the current program, by using a 
non-existent second microdrive. You 
must then reload the system before the 
install option and the relevant prog- 
ram selected. That also applies to 
other sections of the system. Very 
tedious. 

Unusually , there is a facility for 
increasing the amount of data hand- 
led. That does not alter the size of the 
arrays holding the data but alters the 
variables used to determine how often 
the system chugs round the loops. 

The system keeps three ledgers — 
general, sales and purchases — and six 
programs to enter data. Those are cash 



received, bank payments, petty cash 
payments, sales journal, purchase 
journal and journal entries. 

Apart from keeping the books the 
system will also produce account state- 
ments for customers which are well 
laid out with all necessary details. 

Although the entry of data into 
Classic Book-keeping and Financial 
Accounts is relatively easy, the time 
wasted with large numbers of microd- 
rive cartridges makes it unwieldy* 

It Is an impressive accounting sys- 
tem which you might prefer not to use 
but it is one from which you might be 
only too happy to receive reports, 

MUu Tngk 



Publisher Manx Tapes Garey Veg. 
Glen Audtyn, Ramsey, Isle of M»n 
Priea £69.95 



IT*' 



more business softtoort on pugt 12 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



<W 



Thinking software? 



THE TASWORD WORD PROCESSORS 



Tfte extensive features of the Tasword word processors a« 
ides! for both the home and business user. Every Tasword 
comes complete with a comprehensive manual and a 
cassette or disc. The cassette or disc contains your 
TASWORD and TASWORD TUTOR. This teaches you word 
processing using TASWORD. Whether you have serious 
applications or simply want to learn about word 
processing, TASWORD and TASWORD TUTOR make if 
easy and enjoyable. 



TASWORD TWO (Spectrum J 



64 characters per line on the screen! 

'Without Ooubt tfte best utility I have reviewed (or tfte Spectrum. " 

HOME COUmjIlNG WEfmAWIL IW 

'it you have been looking for a word processor, then look no further. " 

The cassette program is supplied with instructions for 
mic rod rive conversion. 

TASWORD TWO* ZX 48K Spectrum ca ssette £ 1 3 .90 
miaodnve cartridge £15.40 



THE TASPRINT STYLE WRITERS 



A must for dot-matrix printer owners! Print your program 
output and listings in a choice of five impressive print styles. 
The Tasprints utitise the graphics capabilities of dot matrix 
printers to form, with a double pass of the printhead, 
output in a range of five fonts varying iron, the futuristic 
Data-Run to the hand writing simulation of Palace Script. A 
TASPRINT gives your output originality and stytei The 
TASPRINTS drive alt Epson compatible eight pin dot-matrix 
printers, e.g. necpc^Q23b-n brother hr$ 

EPSON FX-SO IWVJNESMANN TALLY MT-80 SHINWACP-BO 

EPSON RX-flG STAT? DMP 505/5! 5 DATAC PANTHER 

EPSON MX-BO TYPE If I COSMOS-BO DAT AC FANTH ER II 

Five jmpressrve print styles for your use: 

COflPftCTfl - bold and heavy, good for emphasis 
Efllfl^RLiCi - fi FUTURISTIC SCRIPT 
LECTURA LIGHT - clean and pleasing to read 
HEDIftH ~ a serious business-like script 

P02fl££ &1<JP3 - a dUUxcttvt itwlw W 

lypcal lasfwino output, Pli-asr n«p iftai Artlmenr nutn of priraw produce diFI*r*nr umJouipui 



TASWORD EINSTEIN 



A sixty-four character per line display and the ability to 
hold over five hundred lines of text at any time are just 
some of the features of this, the most recent of the 
Taswords. Full interaction with the disc system — e.g. 
TasWord detects the presence of added drives and allows 
their use. 
TASWORD EINSTEIN Tatunq Einstein disc £1 9-95 



TASWORD MSX 



With all the features of the Spectrum Tasword Two 

including the amazing sixty four character per line display. 
The Tasword MSX machine code program utilises the 32K 
of memory not normally available to Basic allowing over 
five hundred fines of text to be held in memory 



£13*90 



TASWORD MSX* 64 K MSX Computers 

Fully inclusive mail order price 

(cassette includes both disc and tape versions) 



TASWORD 464 



'There is no Detierjustlfication far buying a 464 than this program " 

POPJLWCDMPUllNGWFFKlVNOVlMBtff l%* 

A particularly sophisticated yet easy to use program. Now 
available on disc The cassette version is supplied with 

instructions for transferring to disc 



TASWORD 464* Amstrad CPC 464 & 664 



cassette £1 9'9S 
disc £22*95 



TASWORD 464 D 



This is the new Tasword especially developed to utilise the 
capabilities of the CPC 464 and 664 disc drives. A major 
new feature is a powerful mail merge facility. Tasword 
464-D will only ru n on, and is only supplied on, disc. > 
TASWORD 464-D Amstrad CPC 464 & 664 disc £24-95 



TASPRINT (Spectrum! 



Dwesalf the printer interfaces compatible with TASWORD 
TWO and can be used to print TASWORD TWO text files as 

well as output from your own Basic programs. 

cassette £9-90 
microdriye cartridge £11 -40 



TASPRINT 4SK Spectrum 



TASPRINT EINSTEIN 



Pnnr TASWORD EINSTEiN text files in one or more of the 

TASPRINT fonts . __ 

TASPRINT EINSTEIN disc £14-95 



TASPRINT QL 



TASPRINT OL includes a screen editor used to modify files 
created by other commercial software, such as QUILL or by 
the user from BASIC These modified files include TASPRINT 
control characters and may be printed, using TASPRINT, in 
one or more of the unique TASPRINT fonts 
TASPRINT Ql Sinclair QL microdrive cartridge £19*95 



TASPRINT 464 



Can be used to print AMSWORD^TASWORD 464 text files 
m addition to output from your own Basic programs. 
Drives the Amstrad DMP-1 in addition to the printers 

Irsted above. 



TASPRINT 464 Amstrad CPC 464 & 664 



cassette £9*90 
disc £12-90 



TASWORD UPGRADES 



Tasword 464 and Amsword owners, send your original 
cassette or disc [not the packaging] as proof of purchase. 
Your original will be returned together with Tasword 
464-D on disc £13*90 



•Available from larger Jwa-ntfres or Boors 



Q I is a (r^defnarlc of Stridor Re^e^rch Umi'ed 



think Tasman 






THE TASCOPY SCREEN COPIERS 



The TASCOPY screen copiers print high resolution screen 
copies with different dot densities and patterns for the 
various screen colours This gives the screen copies a 
shaded effect which presents on a monochrome scale the 
colours on the screen. With TASCOPY you can keep a 
permanent and impressive record of your screen pictures 
and diagrams. TASCOPY supports af! the printers 
mentioned under TASPRINT 



TASCOPY (Spectrum & Interface 1 J 



The Spectrum TASCOPY is for use with the RS232 output 
on ZX interface i . It produces monochrome copies fin a 
choice of two sizes) as well as copies with the shaded 
"grey scale" effect described above 
TASCOPY ZX Spectrum 



cassette £9-90 
microdrive cartridge £11 '40 



TASCOPY QL 



TASCOPY OL adds new commands to the QL Superfa^u 
Execute these commands to print a shaded copy of the 
screen contents Print the entire screen orjust a specified 
WFncfow TASCOPY QL also produces large "poster size" 
screen copies on more than one sheet of paper which can 
then be cur and joined to make the poster, and high speed 
small copies. 



TASCOPY QL Sinclair QL microdnve cartridge £12-90 



TASCOPY 464 



Adds two new commands to the 464 Basic to give both a 
standard shaded screen copy as well as a "poster size" 
copy which rs printed onto, two or four sheets which can 
be cut and joined to make the poster 



TASCOPY 464 Amstrad CPC 464 & 664 



cassette £9*90 
drsc £12-90 




Available from, good software stockists and direct from. 



TASMAN 

SOFTWARE 



Springfield House, Hyde Terrace, 
Leeds LS2 9LN ■ tel (0532) 438301 

Telephone AceesWisa ofders: Leeds |OS32J 43830 P 



PLUS . . . 



TASWIDE The Screen Stretcher 



With this machine code utility you can write your own 
Basic programs that will, with normal PRINT statements, 
print onto the screen in the compact lettering used by 
TASWORD TWO. Wrth TASWJDE you can double the 
information shown on the screen I 



TASWIDE ZX 1 6K + 48K Spectrum 



£5-50 



TAS MERGE The Mail Merger 



Transfer data from MASTERFILE to TASWORD TWO! Letters 
and forms typed on TASWORD TWO can be printed with 
addresses and data taken from MASTERFILE The mail 
merge facility allows, for example, multiple copies of a 
letter to be printed, each containing a drfferent name and 
address taken from your MASTERFILE data. To use 
TASMERGE you must nave one or more microdrives 35 
well as TASWORD TWO and MASTERFILE Oy Campbell 

Systems (version 9 or later). 

£10'« 



TASMERGE ZX 48K Spectrum 



TASMAN PRINTER INTERFACE 



Plug into your Spectrum and drive any printer fitted with 
the Centronics standard paraJlel interface. Supplied 

complete with ribbon cable and driving software. The user 
changeable interface software makes it easy to send 
control codes to your printer using the method so 
successfully pioneered with TASWORD TWO The cassette 
contains fast machine code high resolution Full width 
SCREEN COPY SOFTWARE for Epson, Ma nnesmann Tally 
Shinwa. Star, and Tandy Colour Graphic [m colourl) 
printers. TASCOPY, shaded screen copy software for this 
interface jvafue E9-90 — see description on left) is included 
in this package. 



CENTRONICS INTERFACE ZX Spectrum 



£39-90 



COMPUTER PRINTER CABLES 



RV U for ZX INTERFACE 1 

MSX CENTRONICS 

AMSTRAD CPC 464 CENTRONICS 



£14-50 
£800 
C9-90 



if you do not want to cut (Mi magaane, simply wme qui your order and post to 
TASMAIM SOFTWARE DEPTSU SprangfieW HOuSt Hyd? Tettaee Leeds U29UV 

I tnticxe a cheque/PD made payable to TASUMN SOFTWAPf [ H Of? charge my 

i ACCESWfcA number 

j rjAME IT EW 



PMQ 



ADDfi£S<, 






Sendmellv free Tasman brochure describing your product \_J Ticfchmr 
I would like to know more jbout your programs fc* (please ftdc| 

AJI pficej include VAT and packaging. 



Business Software 



Decision Maker 



IN ANY business ;i range of mathe- 
matical tools can be used to solve 
problems and help make decisions- 
Decision Maker for the 48 K Spec- 
trum is ont such tool. 
It is designed to give an understand- 



oritir t>(h! 




o 






Lng of the concepts of decision analy- 
sis, and then to allow those concepts to 
be put into practice. 

Decision analysis is a technique 
used for solving problems in which 
decisions have to be made. It involves 
constructing a diagram showing the 
outcome of each decision and its 
relationship to the original decision. 

The package consists of a teaching 



cassette , an applications cassette and a 
manual . Only one of the 1 2 chapters is 
devoted to running the applications 
program. That one chapter is the 
driest of them all. 

The teaching cassette contains JO 
programs, each designed to be used in 
conjunction with a chapter of the 
manual . 

Each program deals with a particu- 
lar aspect and usually includes a selec- 
tion of multiple choice questions at the 
end. Before you move onto the next 
program an analysis of your perform- 
ance is displayed with the option of 
running through the questions again. 
At times the questions repeat them- 
selves with monotonous regularity. 

The applications program allows 
you to build up a decision tree, 
starting from a first decision. At each 
decision the number of outcomes is 
entered, followed by the name, value 
and, if it is subject to chance, the 
probability for each outcome in turn. 
The tree has a maximum of 150 
decisions and five outcomes for each 
decision. A useful feature — chain — 
allows part of the structure to be 
repeated without retyping. The whole 
tree, minus details, can be shown on 



the screen. An excellent range of 
editing facilities allows the data to be 
changed at almost any stage. 

As you are unable to examine any 
decision other than the first from the 
main menu detailed study becomes 
tedious. Unless you are extremely 
adept at analysing the structure of 
those problems in your head, you need 
to outline the tree on paper before 




entering the details. Fortunately, the 
speed of the calculations for even a 
medium-size tree makes it worth- 
while, 

Mike Wnght 



Street London W1X 3LA 
Memory 48K Prie* El 495 





Computer Accessories 



ZX Spectrum and QL 
Microdrive Storage Box 

Designed to match QL and Spectrum 
> Holds 20 cartridges and index cards 
• Fully interlocking 



Spectrum and QL 



Available trorp se'ecled 
W h Smnh 5 sn'j leadmg 

ynputer shops 



QL Centronics Interface . . . . £29.95 

QL Dust Cov& £5.00 

QL RS 232 Lead £10.00 

QL Monitor £299.00 

Spectrum monochrome monitor connector Ell 50 

Spectrum V Dust Cover £4.00 

Microdrive Cartridges £199 

Spectrum R.G.B Connector £45 00 

Spectrum repairs £15,95 

»We also supply printers, monitors, labels, 
ribbon and listing paper. 



j TRANSFORM LTD. (Dept.SU) 089 283 4783 S 
Swatlands; Lucks Lane, Paddock Wood, Kent TN12 6QL. 



The Rotronics 

Wafadrive 
' Peripheral of 

the Year ' 



The Computer Trade Association/Leisure 
Electronics Trader Peripheral of the Year 
Award. Persona] Computer News Best Buy. 
And nominated for tht_ a British Micro Awards. 
All these successes are a result of Waf adrive s 
transformation of Spectrum data storage 

Now, the power and convenience of floppy 
d i s k can be yours, but at a fraction of the cost - 
only £129-95! 

Wafadrive houses five major components - 
micro interface, two 128K drives, RS232 serial 
and Centronics parallel ports - all within one 
compact unit. We've also included Spectral 
Writer — a superb word processing program - 
and a blank wafer. So you can start operating 
straightaway. 

Wafers are available in three sizes - 128K, 
64K and lliK. All load well overten times as 
fast as cassette, and their data integrity is on a 
par with floppy disk! 



You 11 find a rapidly growing range of 
software from games to business applications. 

Find out more about the Wafadrive revo- 
lution. Ring us on High Wycombe 45275? or 
write to Rotronics Limited, Santosh House, 
Marlborough Trading Estate, West Wycombe 
Road, High Wycombe, Bucks HPU 7 LB- We'll 
send you our full colour brochure by return . 

ROTRONICS 




TumpkihT Tintlc A'ivjjcijiliiiri Km PiiHtudof the Year (Peripheral I 



the Spectrum storage system 







Simple and 'mi 
programming Plufl Dht &m 
(unction connectors trite Ifve 
required Spectrum key 
positions -Ready i 

Support* roytick* wuh two 

independent (tre action*; 
Photon BJaste's and Nsulron 
Bomb* at Ihe leuch of your 
fingertip* 

Extension pan 'or combined 
use of peripherals. 



£19.95 



««■ VAT MFtl 



Compatible with all Atari typo 
jovslicKs including Quickahot 
II Iwithout rapid f i re action) 

Interface operates, joystick 
parallel to keytMMfdi Joystick 
action compatible with Any 
add oris including 
rmerodnues 

Select key f u nctions Snyl irno > 
even when the game is 

already looted 



t*e* 




COMCONTWIN 
JOYSTICK INTERFACE 



£22.95 

incl. VATarKlP&P 



Two port version allows connection of two joysticks far 
sequential two pUye-' flames using same key poj.itio.ns 
Inon- independent^ 



OUtCKSHOT 2 ■ 2 
JOYSTICK 

modified to incorporate 
2 ■na'Cpend*"! fire actions 
and no rapid lira option 



£13.95 

incl.VATandPSiF 



fLKSHTLINK HOTSHOT £10.50 

JOYSTICK mtl VATandPftP 

With two (ndtpsndent firB action* 

Dealer Enquiries 

Welcome: Phone CURRAH USPEECH UNIT £21.95 

Ludld w (Q6A4) 4S94 fits bib CGMCON e«wit>on riot i ncl VAT and p&p 

ALSO AVAILABLE FROM SELECTED RETAIL OUTLETS 

Sand to. 



CDCI 1X11 1 HocKeya Mill. Temeside. 



Ludlow, Shropshire SYS IPC 



Mr /Mrs. /Miss: 



Address: 



Postcode: 



<*ty 


Code 


item Hem Prk* 


Total £ 




01 


Co moon Interface £1995 






03 


ComconTwin Interface £22.95 






03 


QuickshaT 2 * 2 Joystick £13 96 






04 


Flighllink Hotshot Joystick f 10.50 






05 


Currah LiSppec+i Unit £21 95 






OS 


Comcon with Quickshot 2 2 £31 M 






07 


Comcon with Hotshot £28.45 




1 endow a cheque/postal order mads payable to Frel Ltd. for: 


£ 



ZX SPECTRUM 

PRINTER INTERFACE 



"One of the too** wniprehensiwe printer interfaces 

available for Ihe Spedtwn. With a choke of both 

Centronics and RS232 in 1fi# or* interface; It witi 

satisfy most" (SINCLAIR USER MAGAZINE). 

"A remarkable device which pocki considerable 

ingenuity into O small box. Should be Almost 

irTHsistable." (COMPUTING TODAY) 

"I will keep looking for the perfect interface but in the 

megrttime I'll u» the next besl tning -IXLprint III." (ZX COMPUTING} 







ZXLprint III interface enables your Spectrum computer (Trior 48K) to 
print on □ I most any dot mqtrix or daisy wheel printer w ith RS232 or 
Cenlronics input. Jusl plug in ZXLprint HI and LPRINT and LLIST 
commands will work. COPY works without any software on Epson, Star 
Delta, Brother HR5 & 1 009, Gem i ni, Walters WMBQ, Mannesman MTJ3Q, 
KagaTbxon, Cannon, Shinwa, Seikosha 100, 250 & 500. Plus Seikosha 
GP7Q0 in FULL COLOUR Alio available is optional COPY in 4 colours 
on CGP1 1 5 r MCP40 & 80 ond SCP80. 

No additional software needed - RAM is free to fake Tasword 2, 
Masterf tie, OCP +00 software, Kemp Business Accounts etc. 



i WORD PROCESSING • PLUG IN FOR LLIST LPRINT & COPY 



♦ PRINTS SPECTRUM GRAPHICS & UDG's •HIGH RESOLUTION 



SCREEN DUMPS »TWO COPY SIZES ON EPSON & COMPATIBLES 



' PRINTS PRESTEL FRAMES WITH SUITABLE MODEM 
i COMWIBLE WITH MICRODRIVES & INTERFACE 1 







mliJ^ii^lJLju 

.TRADE SALES:Jp6842292448 _ 

AVAILABLE FROM TRANSFORM LTD, 

24 WEST OAK, BECKENHAM, KENT. BR3 2EZ TEL 01-658 6350 

From: Name 

| Address . 






I 



I 



This order is for: 
| ZXLprint III at £34,95 
RS 232 Coble at C9 95 

Tasword 2 a I CI 3.90 



(Qty) 



[Qfy 



I 

I Cheques/PO payable to 
I TRANSFORM LTD 

Please specify make of your printer 



Centronics Cable at £9.95 
4 Colour Option at £5.00 

Amount enclosed 



2X Spectrum (5. a registered trade mark of Sinclair Research Ltd 



01-658 6350 



74 



SINCLAIR USER August IW 



Books 






All aboard for Mars 



EVERYONE with a QL 
dreams of doing something 
useful with it but if you 
cannot, then you can always 
pretend you are doing some- 
thing useful. That is a fairly 
accurate description of what 
Patrick J Hall is doing in 
The Real Thing? Micro- 
computer Simulations cm the 
Sinclair QL. 

The book is packed with 
practical simulation prog- 
rams which take those who 
are willing to type them in, 
into the heart of the human 
circulatory system a into a 
gas turbine and on a trip to 
Mars. 

The simulations are split 
into three categories which 
deal with processes, the 
evolution of natural forces 
and the planning of human 
endeavours. The programs 
use the full graphics and 
numeric capabilities of the 
QL, They can be used just 




for fun or for getting ideas 
for your own simulations. 

The programs also have a 
more practical educational 
use. For instance, the gas 
turbine, steller evolutiun 
and design of a reservoir 
could be used in school or 
college classes. Who knows, 
the town planning simula- 
tion could even be used by 
councils. 

The descriptions of the 



programs, which are split up 
into SuperBasic procedures 
for easy reference and 
understanding, together 
with explanations of techni- 
ques, makes fascinating 
reading. 

There is probably more in 
Hall's book about program- 
ming the QL than in most of 
the other books on Super- 
Basic put together. Hall not 
only knows his subject but 
has the rare knack of leading 
you at a steady pace through 
complex programming tech- 
niques without talking down 
to you, 

While educationalists 
should jump at the chance to 
get hold of a copy, the home 
user will also benefit from 
Hall's wide experience on 
theQL. JohnGitb&f 



Tha Real Thing? 
Publish sr Sigma 
Price £7 95 



Get less from your Epson printer 



AS THE flyleaf of Susan 
Currans book Gel more from 
the Epson Printer points out, 
for many microcomputer us- 
ers a printer is a major 
purchase. Unfortunately, 
this work fails to live up to 
the promise of its title. 

The author cannot be 
faulted on the decision to 
concentrate on the Epson 
range. 

The book falls down in 
that it fails to offer much 
practical advice on just how 
you may exploit the full 
power of your printer. QL 
owners will find some advice 
on how dot matrix printers 
may be used in conjunction 
with the four Psion packages 
bundled with the computer. 
The details provided, 
though, are in no more 
depth than those to be found 
in many other publications 
dealing with the QL. There 
is no information concern- 
ing the Spectrum which may 
be used in conjunction with 



any of the printers from the 
Epson range. 

Perhaps the weakness of 
the work is best illustrated 
by the section on user de- 
fined characters. While the 
author shows how you may 
go about defining an alter- 
nate character set, in a more 
understandable fashion than 
the manual accompanying a 
printer such as the FX80, 
that is as far as she goes. It 
could be expected that the 



book would offer a few char- 
acter sets of its own. 

A disappointing book 
which provides little in- 
formation beyond that to be 
found in the documentation 
provided with the QL and 
printers from the Epson 
range, Gary Evans 



Gat mora from the Epson 
Printer 

Publisher Covins 
Prica £7 95 (paperback) 



Books for 
beginners 

KELLY TEMPLE is pre- 
senter of XYZ On Air for 
Capital Radio, a programme 
dedicated to computers. He 
admits he is a beginner and 
his book, Capital Radio's 
Book of Computers and Sim- 
ple Programming is aimed at 
beginners and is non- 
machine specific. 

Twenty five pages are de- 
voted to details of home 
computers. The main bulk 
concentrates on all the 
familiar features of Basic. 
There is nothing to recom- 
mend the book to owners of 
the Spectrum User Guide. 

The Spectrum Data Log is 
a workbook intended for 
beginners, but tackles the 
subject in a different way, 
As captain of the Star ship 
Questar the reader is led 
through a series of exercises 
covering the main com- 
mands in Spectrum Basic. 

You are encouraged to 
write out the programs in 
the workbook in the spaces 
provided and design the 
graphics on the squared 
spaces provided , Spectrum 
Data Log is an interesting 
approach for young begin- 
ners. Tkeo Wood 



Capital Radio's Bnqk Of 
Computers and Simple 
Programming 
Publisher Interface 
Publications Price C3.95 
Spectrum Data Lug 
Publisher Collins 
Price E2.QG 



Learning the hard way 



CHRISTOPHER Leigh's 
book Starting Logo is based 
on the program Spectrum 
Graphics Logo also pub- 
lished by Sigma at £17-95, 

Spectrum Graphics 

Logo is a graphic subset of 
the language without the list 
handling capabilities of 
Sinclair Logo. It comes 
with a keyboard overlay 
which allows commands to 



be ENTERed by the use of 
single keys. 

There is one glaring fault 
which overrides any other 
consideration. There is no 
way you can SAVE Logo 
procedures onto tape or mic- 
rodrive. The only way to 
obtain a record is by print- 
ing them out on a printer. 
All very well for owners who 
have one, though it is frus- 



trating to work on programs 
and have to type them in 
later for revision. 

For that reason both pack- 
ages are not worth purchasing. 
The t> Wood 



Starting Logo 

Price ES.95 

Spectrum Log a Graphics 

Publisher Sigma Press 

Price £1 7 95 Memory <*8K 



SINCLAIR USER August I98S 



75 












CAMEL PRODUCTS 



1 


^^^^ 


■ 


1 


v ^aata sm 


] 




aaaaaHaHB__.ataal 





NEW POLYPRINT FOR SPECTRUM 

. . . Trie Iftlaftaw winch likes to say . . . Ja 
and Qui and Si and of course- VES 1 A 
Spectrum Centronics interlace with muh> 
Ursoual diars fi EPROM, as in EPSON, 
FX&O pnnter. Printer driver also in 
EPROM Use* notes snort how Id use 
EPROM lor UTILS Of Sown loadable 
chart. 

POLYPRINT tan silicon CMy E44.S5 

PHINT-SP f or SpGCl m m 

Lowccal Centronics IF with CABLE Scirtwar e on laps £31.25 

EPROM PROGRAMMERS 

BB-PROM for the BBC 

With fesl programming ZIF socket, Vpp generator 8 suTtwaife in SWTt Fc* 
276*'t29EPHOW3 CUM 

Q-PROM for the QL 

A powerful programmer with Fast ar»d Smart pTjgrarnmmg software <n Irrmware. 
For 276+128- S A' type*i utabli In ROM carlrsdfl* for you own utilities ale. 
CHECK. HEAD CHC . BLOW fi VE HIFY, past or all EPROM E6S.9S 

Q-C A RT ROM reader for QL 

Ta*e5 2764or2712H C5.9S 

S| PROM-64 for Commodore C-64 

Fast programming. 2aF socket, Vpp generator, software on [ape Far 2764 i2& 
EPROMs. Full (unctions inc. CRC E34.75 

64-CARTFDT2K64KEPF(Oiyto1^meCMninM>dOr»fH E5.9S 

BLOPROM-SP 

A uniquely 
sophisticated 

EPROM 
PROGRAMMER 

Epror-i programmer lor 1He 2516V32V 
S*5*wX'l »'1 2SA CHECK 
HEAD PHOGRAM £ VERIFY all Of 
pari Q« EPFlOto 

So immensely use* Inerdly you'll 
hardly need the manual Designed 
lor the begnnw but includes a single 
Key «*> roule tor He orotessionai 
Supplied as ftrmwaia. Ihe nv'c driver 
routine alone is wtalri more 1hart (h* 
pries or BLOPHOM-SP Ho Person- 
ality Cards, or other additions just a 
Spectrum.. Several anbuiit sai&iy 
lealures Ortioard Vpp generation 
28 pin ZIF Socket Cabled connector 
emender piug ABS case tif&.&S 




sm,t »e en {rsrru -hi. 

KWJtiTw*! -JJiJi 

Pl»i'l ; - iCDfl Wt 

fH»! r mm - Hit 

J0*tE»S'H - DH 

r*5l CltCK 

WHICH T13S m)YllU*«l- r-ll EC 
WJ CnFC< i««r reccm iFiIKm 
■ I «*? "4 i.wUMs fit ItnOM ihl-U 

■i I: On kt fPSIlw K-'fi* S«"« FHOta 

MM 
j: 'diRmrKtiEMOUDtuisrm siw 

M ik ua 

oiocuf noni'iir 

FBI JDES'tttlMlr 

d i* pqp. wit? 



AT LAST! 

For the Spectrum user. Put you 
programs, utilities, Assembtsfs irv» 

to EPROMs lor inslanl load tram 
tha un*que HOM-SP 



{•*«^r »iw*rwi»n It Or W» * f**<ar fff* Kir 



ROM-SP for Spectrum 

Ingenious unit tar Spectrum, with 2x23 pin sockets and a Flesal button allows 
up 10 16K oi Basic or W/C program to RUN or LOAD instantly Irom EPROMs 
Cabled connector and lull extender card. MOTE. Does not disable Sinclair 
POM E29.95 

PRO M ER- S P for Spectrum 

An economical Sp«*um programmer for 376*128 Zero msenion force soc**i 
* software an tape E29.9& 

PROMER fl 1 -S 

The very oopular ZX81 Or 6flrartini*r for 1 761 '32 EPflOMs IMS been adapted 10 £ 
rhe Spectrum and me price is kept low E24J96 

DHOBI 1 UV ERASER 

Compact. Main powered Sale . Fully cased . Up to 3 EPROMs E1 B-95 

DHOBI 2 With automata: tnter E22.S5 

Only with * Cantat Programmer A whlta *t«cK« mtt, 

* YOU BETTER BELIEVE IT * 

NEW 2764 or 27 12B E2.99«ett 

CRAMIC-SP NEW for Spectrum 

mojamous software paaefl isk fton-votatiie cmos ham to oo-eodM in the same 

area as Spectrum ROM Easy storage and retrieval Of BASIC. M/C or DATA on & 
toK Spectrum t«.35 

NIKE POWER BUFFERS 

NiCq battery back-Lip Irx Spectrum ZXBi/ATMOS E1 7.35 

DREAM-81 1orZX81 

64K Rampaok with linti options 10 disable 0-B-18K. Pius a 26 pin EPHOM SOCfcal 
)ot2716 . S73B>S764Br¥J27iaB tSfl.flS 

MEMIC^ei forZX81 

4K CMOS HAM will litnium battery Easy SAVEing, 10yr storage and instant 

retrieval (A programs £22.95 

on* Mlltan Road UK. VAT artr* 

CambftdaeCBltUY Pi P UK Free 

Ho VAT on export* 

TcH : (K!3| 3 14*1 4 Europe - 5% 

Telex 41 67* CM L Ovtnmmt > 10% 



O'LEVELS 

not just revision but also tuition 
for the Spectrum 48K 



Mathematics 

a pragjsmi T0T*t 15fltt 



Fractions, i^uare nntt dKimti ■Dpmrttruiu hei*. hh 
accuracy. Iltui. mwren raiurm nkii, lUnAnd i^m 
mwfclta number let. P") charts liirogiinin nraunximi 
•quatlHie, ban chant, m > ^ i, pnA^ittr jij^wm: «m 
quadrDKa. matneei. yaeton tr*i i iiiim u u rul fflomsfy ntjo 
mevy difreremlaHon imagraber latnyn. ■ngi«i 



Physics 



7 pragmmi TOTW. I46K 



RatlfC** 1 -putalengtti md Ih*^j*n4 > . hOfiieSHi. lunim Ihe 
n« and 4i d«i«t*. amarlov oc&out. rrnanwim. itnbn. 
Omi \ami amps. wKi, w«i paraM. i**dnsr>e». haai, qid 
l**i. nn»ngy hnrmt. ipKlfic t*it kkwHc anafffr half-hM, 
ilcfnh: Elnchirs 'Jr»il«iri <X^O| m . Na*OT.'l htM 



Biology 

6 F-'llK|idl='ra TDTM. laOK 



Piam and anmal oalli. oongac*. nh»nl»jx# leproOUCMin «1 
mon aoaiuDl and iflKual 'trjodi^lian. fl(HM«nng pIvitA phsto* 

rtiHiK aaniDii^. Innipirftlion. Ir«rvpb^t. f»Kl*rii rgrxt 
sua. dwl akmBitKry owul -'•vtribari visnjhcri. ty«. flun. 
rwrwsui ■synhan, Bcoayslpn. IdocI c^d«i. 'iingi HitrtwcinTi. 
arhphbiflrrt. twrafa. nwimaJi. 'eipsriM 



— et .- Data copsenw. eodn^. aunqs nnrmiurg n~— innfm «k 

dQfnputer atlltlieS dnwr df aysdema pnvcv, Hcwtiy. mrdwini Mdniw 

a*liwaifr. law and tagri ravai lan^nwpB». machinv cado. 
7 programs 10 f/n. i *cn assembitis. imfo-aiH'i a n m pJ a ia. «n«ra ir, (imgrjin^vng. «u 

«o aacugalng. rrn j e c ndt macnina frjamaiic" 



Chemistry 

S program TOTM. ISOK 



Mattv iMh. Kticn oi h*K art) H a mn otr, weaon mrh w, 
■vtv. acd> ami*, imooan*. ojtvgan. wkirtui, nauaan. pom- 
phoriir carbon, h^dmaan. M i rnlaH , MuHna twi mtttli, 
mam macpic. vgarw; r.h»mijiry Mrmn. lommtat. nwtar 
mau. «jJ«tions. icrq. panoOc M*a. DOnOVig. a a ail. IMH 



French 



Regular and vragdv nor 'bHihiym, 

paatlnl, atMnKv*, tonnil franxm, 

and parvMi* MAM. Mgk ird Lorpuuid nun, n^piTii w 

and fhur lerma. aov*rfr p^asoa m^iiiiitn mm iLcwuativHin 

BonaweliDra, pnpoMona idnnn, mnhrpiaA 



Electronics 

a progrnnn TOTAL IS* 



Energy and He bowo*. j»w*< dwnibuimr « m r r>d inn™ 
currant power, r.m a t-aluaa, itmifi nm m piriiku 
capacitors, ima conatarai. t tau ea a r a, n anUarfnwi mnnti 
mtewpnonaa, ir mlan I aliana. haaa and iow ansm <an 

atofi, ngc «m*a. mattribraiai* rrHMrs, CRQ 



Each subject ONLY £5.00 inc. p/p. 
Available soon 



— |. . | CcimpuHiliL^i Njrrahan da-kcriphian. diicuiLiryi. htti«rtn#ni. 

tngilSll LetlOUage >:nri»m.|itin irp'minr. wnpriaiii unhnu rei»»1n*1ion. 
pdra^racih pui^ualwn aquT^rt waamriaii Dl iAXTimii. rtmniv 
4 H?0QfaniFj TOTAi I60K inlfHiic*. iuwnar.zir*) 



German 

i ixWBnis TOTN. lew 



Strang, waak, ftfmarr and irmad mh iingujr and plural. 
IndlcMva actr*a and ncaafoa u^fsean* mcvraima man. 
kwa. ae c ua ath e and dattvw aiKiat. ncwni pn*™ii, 
titai adVerba. Mniurteitoni praceaMlant. nurtibara 
cjoenMy. Inmi. word fr dor 



Economics 

a fwrqmrns m 1*j SflOK 



Pnct ifwei iwc»t. changaa m output amptoytp an j ana fomm. 
ramnga and anpandnur*. knaneial irwHuasna, irwnaaonai 
taOnp. popmatJen md its aeuctura, mant« torcaa, umty tna 
damand. ere* fannatjcn. njuairh* lecaHen acala and hrm at 
anlerprlt», mow) •cononty 



LOGO, FORTH 
PASCAL & C 



BdHw 



1 prDgram Each 10K 



Taacnng wKnt of »i«a lanauaoct. inoudmo a iix Hun 
(ac-raan achtnr; *nd a 48 pafia tuayiai manual Savmrj _ 
laadng of pmgramt a a avaan adagr tgnetion Mtt* tacatH 
ana pnjwdad lor aaay tu*«n and 0*CuM>n4 AvataBlWy. Past- 
now C now. Uhjb. tl»n, FgiBi won 



Each language only £5-00 inc p/p. 

GCE TUTORING 

quality educational software 
40 BRIMMER HILL, WIDMER END, HIGH WYCOMBE, BUCKS MP15 6NP 




Please send me : 



My name and address : 



My computer ha a: 



I enclcae a cheque.'PO f*r £ 

MjmHi payable Id GCE Tutoring 



SUB 



76 



SINCLAIR US 1-R August 1985 



PROGRAM 
PRINTOUT 




GRAPHICS 
INSTRUCTIONS 

IN GENERAL, graphics abbreviations arc enclosed in bracken, which 
should noi be entered . A siring of the Mime graphics character 15, 
represented in the form (3*AJ which would be enicred as AAA, where 
A is the graphics character, A space, where it is important to have the 
correct number of spaces, is indicated by Csp), Spaces in text wilt not 
normally be indicated. Where several graphics characters are Used, they 
are separated by commas, which should not be entered- With Spectrum 
and QL listings the letter ! has a flat lop and the numeral 1 has a sloping 
top. 

The above applies to all Sinclair machines, The following instruc- 
tions are for specific machines - 

ZX-S1: ZX-81 listings are generally reproduced as they appear when 
you enter thciti, spaces and all Where extensive graphics arc used, 
REM statements will be inserted to provide a guide to the position of 
each character, 

Spectrum: User-defined graphics are represented by underlined 
letters, without brackets. Type the appropriate letter while in graphics 
mode. The underline does not appear on the screen, Inverse characters 
have the letter i before them, e.g. iZ, iA, LP. Block graphic characters 
are indicated by g followed by the number of the appropriate key: g4 
would mean the block graphics on key 4, ig4 the inverse of that graphic 

Control codes are indicated by cc before the character , and are 
obtained by pressing CAPS SHIFT whiie in extended mode. They do 
not appear on the screen but may change the colour of the cursor and 
will affect what is printed after them: cc3,i* would thus have the effect 
of printing an inverse asterisk in red, 

QL: User-defined graphics on the QL arc indicated by .1 de^Lription 
of the keys pressed to obtain them, underlined and in brackets, ["hub 
(CTRL + 9) means press CTRL and 9 together. The same applies for 
unusual characters within the QL character set, which our printer is 
unable to reproduce, 



B 



E YOUR OWN street-corner capitalist in 
Shopkeeper by L N Langiey of Bury St 
Edmunds, Suffolk. The game runs on a 
48K Spectrum or Spectrum Plus, and sets you the 
task of running a corner shop for a year. You must 
choose from a large range of goods in stock, and 
take weather and holidays into account. Those 
factors can also affect your advertising strategies. 
Experienced programmers should find it easy 
to alter the parameters for various products if they 
desire, and add extra random events and hazards 
with ease. 



IB PAPER h: KOftDER 2: INI Bl 
kSH E): BRIGHT 3: OVER 0i THIERS 
0: CI. 5 
15 PRINT AT 0,11; INVERSE 1 ; " S 



HOPLCETFEP" 
?0 PRINT 

1 ve 
LO Set 
I l . 

Jle I 

I . " 



up 
far 



1 Van are a prospect 
shopkeeper ■ You have 
your shop and try to 

a V^ar. Vou lose 14 

hM'ti fupt or i* you t 

than HI OB in -any wee 



When answering 
the Answer in 



~H PRINT 

ion typein 
-s. " 
40 PRINT " When ordering,, 
m ' the itembv typing in the 
r acter 
left hand 

| lid! 

er the 

OH WIS hi to 

^B PRIHT 

h»- weather 

in to 

q. Cer tain 
cert a i n 

rdlng to 



a t\ 
low 

Ml 

I h a 



indicated in the far 
column. Then follow 
i rwtruc 1 1 on » and ent 
amount of the item y 
order. M 

• Remember to tale t 
and the time of year 
account when order in 
thmtjIS sell Mel 1 itt 

times. Others sell a 

the weather . Sume da 

n't sol 1 ' " 

60 FRINT4*1;AT 1,10; "PRESS ANY 

i i;v" 

70 PAUS1 

00 CLB : PRINT " Also remembe 
r to tat fc! t. he tiraeuf the year- an 
d the rteatlier intoaccount when c 
hoosing your advertised pro 

due '. ti - " 



100 PRINT ^liAl 1,10! "PRESS ANY 

I EY" 

105 PAUSE 01 CLS 

109 REM *#»#**wYaUR CASH+«###»* 

110 PRINT "You have decided to 
run a shop. You will operate it 
for* one year and try to make a pr 
Of it in a very tough business" 



111 PAUSE 500 

120 LET cash- 200+ INT !RND#B01 
l :n PRINT "You have dug out a 
your life aavings for this b 

me venture. You have 

1 ca'jl 

i ' . PAUSE 400 

140 IP crash -IBB THEN LET at= 
du hd.d better worl: hard or el 5 
.in will n.o banf.rupt iwl th SUch 
ittle money" 

150 IF cash '400 THEN LET a* = 
his is a fair amount of money 

»efc up your shop wi th" 
160 IF cash>e00 THEN LET at- 

ell done 1 You. must have saved- 
ull to have this much money" 

• pRirn **•■ ' 

171 PAUSE 250 

| PRINT "Now is the time t 
■j ^h ■_ 1 da whether you want 

1 .'ii or not " 

176 INPUT "Pq you want a loan 
■ly/ru "ill 

177 IF l*-*n' 
TD 400 

170 IF 1 1 "1 
00 TO 176 



17*7 REM «»»*#**-GET (.DAN******** 

ltJB PRINT "In your torn there a 
re 2 bants, One is Barclay's. Th 

# other is Lloyd's. Lloyd 'A CriJ 

rges less interest on loini bu 

t have a surcharge of £5iH on 
evei y loan, fear 1. 1 ay s doe 5 not" 

190 INPUT "Which bant would you 

1 lit? to geta loan frcm"? lb/1 



DP 1*="'N" THEN 



OR lf="Y" THEN 



> 


b* 


11 


200 LET loan"1300+INT CRNDt 1UB1 


LIS 


J 


1 


210 LET inter est- £50+ INT <RND*1 




10) J/1B 




220 IF lif-"L" OR &*»"1" THEN G 


"Y 


TO 300 


ev 


2^0 IF u< :>"B" AND b* "li" THEN 


1 


60 TO 190 




240 PRINT "You have decided to 


"T 


visit Barclay's ba'ii 


t 


241 PAUSE 200 




250 LET payments^ INT CIp*n*(int 


"W 


ere st/ 100+1) /IZi 


M 


260 PRIN1 "The bant manager dst 




ides to giveyau a loan of l " ; 1 oa 




2*1 PAUSE 250 





270 PRINT "The rate tH interest 


a 


ii "i interest i "%" 




27 1 PAUSE 250 


«> 


2B0 PRINT "Every 4 weeks vpu wi 




1 1 have to pay a repayment of £ 


B 


'"; payments ' 




20 1 PAUSE 700 




I"?B BO TD 390 




ivnitnui'd on ptige 78 




SrNCLAIRUSHR August 19&S 



77 



"".80 PRINT "¥au have decided to 
Visit Lloyd's bank"' 

301 FAUSE 250 

310 1 ET i r>terest=i nt«mt -2 
1213 LET paymont.4s«=lNT Cla*n*<lnt 
t/ 100+1 y/izt 

33e PRINT "To get a loan of » LI 
pyd's bank you have to pay £50" 

pause: 30B 
"40 LET cash-cash -50 

350 FfJlNT "Thi5 means yctu how li 
ave £" (cash * ' 

351 PAUSE 250 

360 FRINT "The Lloyd's bank man 

sijer wishes you 1 La i_ h and loans y 
PU £"i loan " ' 
"t.1 PAUSE 300 

F F-INT "The rat* Of interest 

" 1 F'flUSE 250 

380 PRINT "Every 4 week'* /Ou mi 
11 have to pay a repayment of £ 
"t payments ' ' 

381 PAUSE 400 

3*?0 LET cash=cash+lo»n 

400 PRINT "You now have a] 1 the 
'■?y you will get to run your' 

•hop. You have £"ic*ih" ' 

401 PAUSE 400 

409 REM +**-**«■*## GET SHDP*»+-»* 

410 PRINT »tt if possible to re 

nt torn* premises or to buy a 

shop yourself " ' ' 

411 PAUSE 350 

420 INPUT "Do you want to rant 
or buy? (r/b> »n» 

430 LET a*="Shnp 1 is small and 

is cheap to rent or buy, It 11 
down a harrawminor road" 

440 let b*»"Shop 2 is a vtry la 
rgt store. Ithas a reasonable re 
nt or price. It is down an old d 
1 luied side str"»*t . " 

450 LET tf="5hop 3 is a reasons 
bly sired Store, It ha* a ver 
y high rent or price. It is on 
the corner of a crofiroads" 

460 IF s* = "r" OR m#-="R" THEN 6 
D TD 390 

470 IF s*x""b" OR 5*="ET THEN 
RD TD 420 

4B0 PRINT "Which one of these s 
1 tes do ynu wish to buy 1 ?"' 

4a 1 PAUSE 250 

490 LET #nINT (RND* 1 00+450 ) t PR 
TNT at ' "'£"; a 1 ' 

4*»l PAUSE 750 

500 LET b=INT (RND#210+530J r PR 
INT b«-"£"sb ' ' 

501 PAUSE 750 

510 LET c=INT <RND*400*700) : PR 
INT c*" "£"( C 

51 1 PAUSE 730 

520 INPUT "Shop number? "js 

530 IF * = I THEN LET cnh-cash- 
ai PRINT "You have paid £"sa; 
or the smallest ■hop' 1, 

53 1 PAUSE 250 

340 IF s-2 THEN LET cash=cash- 
b: PRINT "You have paid £"jbl" t 
or the larqe-jl shop" 

541 PAUSE 250 

550 IF s=3 THEN LET cash=cash- 
CI PRINT "Yau have a well placet* 

shop at apr i ere of £"|e'' 

5 Si F'AUSE 250 

560 PRINT "After paying -for vdj 
r Shop you have £":cash 

561 PAUSE 250 

57B PRINT "You are given the I • 
yo to- your new shop and are pie 
ased with i t ' 

571 PAUSE T0B 

T-.B0 GU TO 690 

5<?0 PRINT "Which One of these p 
rem ie«a would you like to re 
n> ~' i pr ices per week ) " 

591 PAUSE 300 

600 LET a=lNT <RND*4+10i: PR I N 
T at "£"ia ' ' 

601 PAUSE 500 

610 LET b"INT [RND*6+12)| PRINT 
b« ""f ib ' 

611 PAUSE 300 

620 LET c=INT IRND*B+I3>: PRINT 
c* ' "C" ic ' ' 




i2l PAUSE 500 

630 INPUT "Shop number? ■' t B 

640 IF s=l THEN LET rent=ai PR 
INT "You rent the smallest shop" 

641 F'AUSE 250 

650 IF s=2 THEN LET rent-b: PR 
INT "You rent the largest store" 

631 PAUSE 250 

660 JF »»S THEN LET r«nt=c: PR 

INT "YOu rent the well placed sh 
op" ' 

661 PAUSE 250 

670 PRINT "The amount of rent y 
ou pay per week for your shop i 
• £"irent ' 

671 PAUSE 250 

6B0 F-RINT "After having been qi 
v«n the keysto the shop and vlfii 
ted it, yuu believe vOU have a b 
argai n " " 
681 PAUSE 500 

6B9 REM #*«**BUY EQUIPMENT***** 
690 LET tiUMNT <RND* 30+50) 
" CI tl LEI shelves=JNT (.UN D* 20 + 40 ) 
710 LET counter=lNT <RND*3+20) 

720 PRINT "You have to buy a ti 

ii e £ " s 1 1 1 1 

721 PAUSE 200 

730 PRINT "You have to buy some 
shelves @ f'latielves' 1 
' ' 1 PAUSE 250 

740 F'RINT "Ydu have to buy a co 
urnter @ £"j counter' 

741 PAUSE 250 

750 LET tattv»t»sh-cojnter-shel v 
es-t i 1 1 

760 PRINT "After buying these t 
hings you have Encash'' 

761 FAUSE 250 

769- REM -»»-**»6ET INSURANCE*-**** 
770 LET insurance" (INT <RND*5-»-l 
0) )*10 
7B0 PRINT "An insurance company 

sees that you are Betting up a 

■hop and offer you insurance 
against major theft and fire 
, The cost IB £" i i nsurance' ' 

781 PAUSE 750 

79B INPUT "Do you accept the of 
fer" 5 (y/n> "ji# 

B00 IF i*«"y" THEN LET CAsh=ca 
Sh- insurance; 60 TO B.30 

B10 IF | i ■■-, ' THEN GO TD B40 



B20 GO TO 790 

B30 PRINT "After paying for the 
insurance you have E"jcash'' 
831 PAUSE 300 

840 PRINT "You are now ready to 
■tart running your Store"' 

841 PAUSE 300 
845 BORDER 1 
B50 CLS 

860 DIM £#(34, 10) 

070 FOR f-1 TO 34 

B80 READ ztt-f) 

690 NEXT f 
1000 DATA "alcohol ", "tobacco" , " 
chocolate" , "ice creams" ."lollies 

" , "sweets" 

1010 DATA "beef ", "pork" , "lamb" , " 
poultry" , "tin vetj" T "fresh veg " , " 
fruits", "cereals" , "mi Ik". "bread" 
, "biscui ts" , "Squash" , " lemonade" 
1 020 DATA " wa shp owd er " , " M a sh 1 i qu 
id", "soap" , "shampoo" , "tissues" , " 

loo rol Is" 

1030 DATA "newspaper s" , "pens " , "p 

aper" , "cards" , "pi ants" , "toys" , "p 
ol ish", "raincoats", "umbrellas" 

1040 DIM £(34) 

1050 DIM p(34) 

1035 REM »t« ntwUHWW ISHt t W 

1060 FOR f»l TO 34 

1070 READ ptf); LET ja ( f J -p (f > / 10 


1080 NEXT f 

1090 DATA 79.41.17,22,10,3 

1 1 00 DATA 1 29 , 99 , 1 32 , S9 . 2 1 , 27 . 1 3 

,41,20,31,25,19,13 

1110 DATA 100,36,29,39,22,9 

1120 DATA 15,5,3,12,25,150,99,21 

0. 126 

1 1 30 CLS 

1 140 FOR »■! TO 32 

1158 PRINT TAB 10; INK 2 5 "WEEK " 

:w 

1160 IF w-lfi OR w -17 THEN FRINT 

Easter is arriving within 2 

weeks" ' ' 
1170 IF w>28 AND w< 37 THEN PRIN 
T "It is the school holidays'" 1 ' 
US0 IF w<32 AND ™>46 THEN PRIN 
T "Christmas is approaching fast 



1 1 B5 PAUSE 250 
1190 IF w<3 THEN 
ery cold weath&r 



PRINT "It l* v 

and it is snot* 



78 



SINCLAIR USER August 19*5 




fast 



LET rain=li SO TO 1 



i ng 

240 

1200 IF w>20 AND w<30 AND W<>2& 

THEN PRINT "It II hot aticky W* 

ather In your trail, it ie the heig 

ht Of summer "' ' : 00 TD 1250 

121(8 IF RNIK.2 THEN PRINT "What 

a week, It is raining cats and 
dogs and everywhere 1* f 1 OO 

dad" ■"; LET r*ir>*ll GO TD 12S0 
3 220 If RND>. 7 THEN PRINT "Thim 

week is good fine «wthEr " ' ■ : G 

Q TD 1250 

1230 PRINT "Thia week 1* just an 
ordinary week with averigi Br 
l tish weather" 
1240 LET rain=0 

1245 REM #**»»#**#*#*•*»*#■*##*•* 
1230 PAUSE MO 

1251 FRINT "It is time -far you t 
O fill this H»th ' fi order in- Just 

type in theamount o-F each produ 
ct that you require"' 

1252 PAUSE 730 
1233 cls 

1260 LET y*-"Input the 1 at tar of 

nay item youneed & then -follow 
i nstructi ons ' 
1242 PRINT y* 

1265 PRINT AT 3,9: INVERSE I } "CO 
NFECTlONARv 
1270 LET AAA=1 
12 75 LET BBB=6 
1260 GO SUB 5000 
1205 CL5 s PRINT y* 
12*0 PRINT AT 3, 1 1; 
ROGER I E5" 
1295 LET ***-7 
1300 LET bbb=I9 
1310 GO SUB 5000 
1315 CLS 1 PRINT y* 
1320 I RINt AT 5, 11 I 
tllLETRIES" 
1 523 LET AftA=20 
L " W LET I-: 
1 J35 OS SUE 5B0O 
1740 CL5 ; PRINT Y* 
1345 PRINT AT 3."?! 
SCELLANIQU5" 

,0 LET AAA 
1355 LET BBB=:4 

6 6D BUG 5000 
1337 CLS 

I "60 FRINT ""Your order IS now (l 
n i shed" i SO TD 1350 



1361 PAUSE 2SH 

1370 CLS t PRINT 
mofiefv in your 

er any more goods 
ve to rfo Wi thOl.it 

■a that you 

der " ■ ' 

1371 PAUSE 500 
1375 REM ********* 
1300 PRINT "You ha 

e your shop to do 
dlttpl »v * Or" 2 of I 



You are out of 
account to Qrd 

so you Wl 1 1 ha. 
any hidt e thing 
intended to or 



ve room outsld 
an advertising 
nur products" ' 



INVERSE li"E 



INVERSE 11 "T 



INVERSE t;"MI 



1301 PAUSE 350 

1390 INPUT "1st advert! sad pradu 

ct "* j* 

1400 LET c*=" * 

1410 LET J*-j*+c*< TD 10-LEN j*) 

1420 FOR f = l TO 34 

1430 IF j*=l*<f> THEN SO TO 146 

a 

1440 NEXT -f 
14 '.10 GO TO 1S90 

1460 INPUT "2nd advertised produ 
ct "I.:* 

1470 LET k*-**+C#l TD 10-LEN k*J 
14B0 FDR f = l TO ."1 

14*0 IF k#=z»(f) THEN GO TD 132 
1500 NEXT * 
1510 GO TO 1460 
1520 BORDER 4i CLS 

1525 REM **«**»*'####'#****-*»*-»** : * 
PRINT " PI eaae wait while 1 

worl- out hawmuch of each of VO'.i 
r products were wold this weel 

and how muehmoney y° IJ made frcni 

thpi r sal o'-a " 
1531 PAUSE 500 
■1540 LET tal ings=0 

1545 PRINT PAPER 2s EMK 7; , "ITE 
ft PRICE ND.SDLD RECEIPTS" 

1550 FDR f-1 TO 74 
1560 IF f 7 THEN LET fel 

LS70 

-INT 

1580 

t-INT 

1590 IF f >19 AND f- 

t-INT <RND*24) 

1600 IF f "-25 THEN 

Ct IS) 

t605 IF 

D#20> 

1610 IF 



>INT IRND 

'i l f . mND f ■ i 1 THEN LLl t 
<RND«1B) 

IF f >10 AND f<20 THEN LET 
(RND#30t 

26 THEN LET 



LET t=INT !RN 



f>32 THEN LET t"INT <RN 



zCf>=0 THEN LET f=0t 6D 



r 



ijf OR ft(f ) =1 * THE 



td : 733 
1625 IF i*(+J = 
N LET t = t*2 

1630 IF t>B<f> THEN LET t=jCU 
IF w = 16 OR w-17 THEN IF *< 
f-29 THEN LET t = INT tt#2.i 



1640 

3 OR 

> 

16S0 IF w 20 AND *K37 THEN IF f 

= 6 OR f = 19 Dft f=4 DR f=5 THEN L 
ET t 



1660 IF w 5 THEN IF 


f"24 THEN 


LET t=t»2 




16/0 JT »>2fl AND w<30 


AND N >26 


THEN IF f=4 OR f = 5 OR f = 18 THEN 


LET t = t*2 




1600 IF f« 33 AND f 32 


THEN LET 


t=t*f3 AND rain'lixe 


AND rain^i! 


16*0 IF w<52 AND w 46 


THEN IF t 


= 1 UR f = 10 OR fM3 DR 


f»29 OR f- 



31 THEN LET t-t*3 

I7O0 IF s=3 THEN LET t=t+10 

17 10 IF ■■! THEN LET t-t*5 

1715 LET t=t»3 

1720 IF t>z(f! THEN LET t=lHI 

1725 IF (f=23 OR f=Z2 DR f-=32 OR 

f = l2 DR -f-.3B) AND RND-, .9 THEN 
LET t=0 
17Z7 IF (#■ 

w 44 THEN 
1735 LET p= 
100 
1737 
1739 
5. 

1740 
1 -'jV- 
P 




A OR 4 =3 J AND w AND 

LET t=0 
ale=UNT <p44)«il3>l/ 



LET receipts=psal e*-t 

LET tak l ngs=t ak l nqs+recel p t 



LET z (f )-z l-f J-t 
PRINT s*(f)|TAP lliOBAlaiTA 
l*itsTAIii 24:receipts 
11739 NEXT 4 

1760 F'RINT '"Thia weel you toot 
iE"l tak l ngs ' ' 
11761 PAUSE 200 
1765 LET cash = cash + tal< ings 
1770 PRINT "This means you now h 
ave £" i cash 
177 1 PAUSE 200 

BORDER It CLE 

REM +•#**#*•»*•»*#•»••»*--- 

IF taking*-' 100 THEN 60 TO 



1772 
1775 
1790 
6000 

laao 



PRINT 



1825 
1EI30 
ISM 

r en t 



'You now tat-e out you 

r wage! at £100" ' 

1010 LET cash=cash-100 

IB20 PRINT "AH=tar taking out you 

r wages yau have E";cash' 

1821 PAUSE 200 

REM ***-»**#*•#*-»••*••••*•** 
IF a**"b" THEN 00 TO 1070 
PRINT "You have to pay the 
tor your premiaem for th 

is. week which is £"jrent" 

1B41 PAUSE 350 

1050 LET Ci*h"Cl*ri-rent 

1B55 IF cash<0 THEN GO TD 3040 

1960 PRINT "After paying your re 

nt you have C";cash' 

1B61 PAUSE 200 

1063 REM +##*#»*»•••»»*»»••#•*»» 

IB70 IF l*="n" THEN GO TO 1930 

1090 IF w/4-INT <w/4) THEN GO T 

1900 

1B90 GO TO 1930 

1900 PRINT "It is the end of th« 
month and you must pay a repay 

ment of your loan of C"i payments '■ 

1901 PAUSE 20O 

1910 LET c*»h"c*ah -payments 

1920 PRINT "After paying the 1 Da 
n repayment you have £"|C*»h'' 

1921 PAUSE 200 
REP1 ***#■*#**»<##**■***•■••■•• 
IF RND-',2 THEN GD TD 2610 
LET disaster* I NT <RND*6) 
IF dl»e»ter«5 THEN GD TO 2 



1925 

1930 

1940 

1950 

490 

1960 

410 

1970 

570 

i rat 

240 
1990 

100 
1995 

2000 



IF disaster-4 THEN 00 TO 2 



IF disaster=3 THEN GO TO 2 



IF disaster=2 TkCN GD TO 



IF d>saster=l THEN GO TD 2 



REM *< 
FRINT 



"A crafty sale* repra 

sent^tive brings sow children 
s toys into your shop. Ha May* V 
ou can buy them for 50p each an 



SINCLAIR USER Au^at I9S5 



cannmud m page 80 



ctmlmued front pilgt! 79 

d sell them at «n enamaul pro-fi 

t of £1,50" " ■ 

3010 INPUT "Do you buy amy Cy/n) 

"id* 
2020 IF d*="n" THEN PRINT "You 
ri^use hi* off mr* " " I PAUSE 150i 
EG TO 2950 

2030 IF d*<>"v" THEN GO TO 201 

l;040 INPUT "How many do you want 

to : nu 

I05O PRINT "Von bu-, "itiui." of th 
e p ftp ' s toys* ' 
ZtJSI PAUSE 150 

2060 FRINT "All of the toy* turn 
1 □ be dangerous so you can 
not poi*iblv*t>] 1 them. Ynu lose 

1-061 PAUSE 400 

2070 LET cj5h=Lii5h-.5»nu 

20B0 PRINT "A* a result of your 

fi act younon have only £"1C*S 
h " " 

2091 fa use zee 

2090 DO TO 2930 

S REM *»#****-»■»#*#*♦»##*-♦»**«# 

2100 PRINT "A firm rages avernig 
ht in ,'ULir- store. The firemen B 
ivi the building but all of 
ynur good*^ dire 1 ost " ' 

2101 PAUSE 500 

rue if i«-"n" then gd td 2200 

2120 IF i*="y" THEN PRINT ''You 
were a wise person in taV. i nut he 

insurance man's offer"' 

2121 pause 200 
21 30 LET eaver-O 

2 1 40 FOR f = 1 TD 34 

2150 LET cav*r-caver+r (f !*p <f 1 

2160 NEXT f 

21 'o dim i(34J 

2180 PRINT "The insurance firm p 
ay* for all the damage*. You qet 
£'';covtr - 'l LET cash=cash+cover 
2185 PAUSE 200 
2190 GO TO 2950 

2200 PRINT "Ynu had no insurance 
cover and so you lost all your 
qgod* and get no campensati on" 

2201 PAUSE 100 

2220 DIM Z (34* 

2230 GO TD 2950 

2235 REM -##****-»»*-»#**#«*-***»#*» 

22*0 PRINT "During the night a b 

unch a* organised criminals 

steal all ofyoLir ujuodv 

2241 PAUSE 300 

2250 IF i# = "'n" THEN SO TD 27-40 

2260 PRINT *Vou were a clever pe 
rson to invest in some insur 

-J it. e C OVU'" 

2261 PAUSE 700 
.■'2 70 LET cover =0 
22S0 FOR f-=I TO 34 

2290 LET c over =C overt-; (f j # p <| . 
2700 NEXT f 
2310 DIM B<341 

CI PRINT "The insurance ■firm p 
ays for all your lg«Hi. You get 
£ " | COVf r ' '; LET cash=cash+cover 
27 2 1 PAUSE 250 



. IB 


60 TO 


2950 








2740 


F R 1 N T 


"You 


had 


no insurance 


cover and 


get 


no c 


ompensati on" 




PAUSE 


200 








2350 


D1P1 £ 










2160 


GO TO 


2950 








2365 


REM m 










2170 


PRINT 


"Some 


chi 


Idren 


i ■ 1 ■ < 


fancy tn 


your 


■KM 


etm and stea 


1 the lot" 










2171 


PAUSE 


200 








2380 


PRINT 


"You 


Ion 


■-.HPF'T 


s. wort 


h C" 


p(6)*z <6J 








2381 


PAUSE 


150 








ZZ 90 


LET z 


<6)-B 








2400 


GO TO 


2950 








2405 


REM »#IIHIIIII»»IIHtH»»n» 


2410 


PRINT 


" Ah 1 ma 1 rights 


pr cites 


ters 


poison all 


your 


meat 


l n you 


r shop " 










2411 


PAUSE 


250 








2420 


LET 1 DISH 1 











FDR f 


=7 TD 


10 






1 4 40 


LET 1 os*e»" 


'lOHlS+plf >*Z (f ) 


2450 


LET z 


if ) =0 








2460 


NEXT 4 









2470 PRINT " 
E B | loifit 

2471 FAUSE 1 
2400 SO TO 2 
24B5 REN *-»* 
2490 PRINT " 
at al 1 your 
ated food 

PAUSE 
LET Ln 
f =7 
los 
2530 LET s (f 
2540 NEXT f 
2550 LET los 
+ z (5)*p (5>+Z 
2560 LET z i 1 
2570 LET : (4 
2580 LET z (5 
2590 PRINT 
□st where 



a result yau lose 



50 

930 



2491 

: aili 

2510 FOR 
2S20 LET 



A poutr cut mean* th 

frozen and refridger 
goes bad" 

00 

TG 10 

SeS= 1 OS5E5+C ( f I *Z ( f } 

>-H 

s e s= 1 dss e s + z < 4 > *p ( 4 ) 

U2>*p(12) 
2)=0 

' 

>=0 

The goods that you 1 

valued at £"i losses' 



2591 PAUSE 200 

2600 G8 TD 2950 

2605 REM ** « • ■ -» mum ## -»••« *#**-#■# * 

2610 IF RND>. 1 THEN QD TO 2950 

2620 LET IuCky=lNT <RND+6) 

2630 IF lucl-:y=5 THEN GO TO 2710 

2640 IF lUCky-4 THEN GO TO 2740 

2650 IF luel-:y=3 THEN GO TO 2770 
2660 IF lucky=2 THEN GO TO 2010 
2670 IF Lucky*! THEN GO TO 2SO0 
2675 REM #**•#■»#*#»»*#*»#**■»*«■*** 
2690 PRINT "Well done I You have 
wan an award* or running the tidi 
e«t shop In your area. You get a 

prize of £100" ' 

2651 PAUSE 350 

2690 LET cash=cash+100 

2700 GO TO 2950 

2705 REM *■»**•******»»»** »•"-•- ' ■ 

2710 PRINT "0n» day this week a 
nearby rival shop closed down bo 
you had a £S0 boost in sales"' 

271 1 PAUSE 300 

2720 LET eash"C*sh+50 

2730 GD TD 2950 

2735 REM -»***»#+#**###**#■****"#**-**» 

2740 PRINT "Lucky you has won £7 
5 pn the football pools"' 

2741 PAUSE 150 

2750 LET cash=cash+75 
276*1 GO TO 2950 

2770 LET cheque=(INT <RNDftlS>)*l 


2780 PRINT "You find a cheque fo 
r £"s cheque ' " 
27B1 PAUSE 150 
2790 LET cash™ca»h+cheque 
2000 00 TO 2950 

2905 REN *■»**-»**♦-»»»*«•####*#»#* 
2810 PRINT "A customer complains 
that one of your products that ■ 
he bought isfaulty. Do you give 
her a new- one or not (y/n)"' 
2020 INPUT "(y/n) " j n* 
2B30 IF n*="n" THEN 00 TO 2070 



2S40 IF n*< 

2850 PRINT 

being the 
er about a 



>"y" THEN BO TO 2020 
'You win a prize for 

most polite shopkeep 

You get £90" ' " 



2B51 PAUSE SCO 

2060 LET c*sh=c*sh+90 

2070 ED TD 2950 

2S75 REfl ##**##*»#*-t*»*****»»**» 

2090 PRINT "A polite represent at 

i ve comes into your Bhop and a 

fferi you a new product. Do you 

buy any. Thee Cist i« 20p" 

2BB1 PAUSE 500 

2090 INPUT "How many do you H«nt 

" ; r>« 
290O IF nx»0 THEN GD TO 2950 

2910 PRINT "You buy "jllKj" of th 
em at 20p "' ' 

291 1 PAUSE 100 

2920 LET cash=cash-.2#nK 

2930 PRINT "The product sells li 
ke anything and makes ydu a prof 
it of "inK*.3 

2931 PAUSE 250 

2940 LET cash=cash+nif #.5 
295» CLB 

2955 REM ***#■»#*■"( »» »*«»■***-#*'»'**■• 
29tB PRINT "This is the end of t 
he week "in' ' 

294 1 PAUSE 1 00 

2970 PRINT "At the end of Lhl* w 



*ciu haveT'" ; i_ a^h 
2971 PAUSE 

2980 rxs 

I ' I cMh 1 '.INT IcashMP'.' 
00 

29B7 tf cash THEN GO TO '■ 
2990 NEKT w 
'."LK-. I iv I Ml "h*. the end of the ye 

ar you have made a profit o* L": 

Lash 

3001 PAUSE 200 

3010 print "Well done for »r 

out at thered" 
3020 STDP 

3040 CLi : F-'F'iriT "Because VOU ow 
e money you *r* f breed to Ltqu 
i date your bu*ine*S after 

week ■ : m 
3050 LET till=INT IRNDMiLJ' 
30t.0 LET counter » INT <RNp*counte 
r> 

3070 LET shelves=INT (RNP*shelve 
s> 

1080 LET gt="You sell your " 

30FJ5 PRINT g*, "tiH at £ " i t 

3090 PRINT g*:"counter at £"jcqu 

nt«r 

7100 PRINT q*i "Shelve* at £";she 

1 . B« 

3105 PRINT ' 

3107 LET cash=cash + shel ves + tll 1* 

counter 

3110 PRINT "You now have a loc* 
of £"( ABS cash 

7-120 IF ^* = "buy" THEN LET ca*h» 
■ I rfl+INT !RND*500) : GO TO 3140 
3125 GO TD 3t70 

3130 PRINT "fitter selling your ■ 
hop ynu h^ <sh " 
'.'140 It e&*h<0 THEN PRINT "Vou 
still have a 1 amis And so I sugg 
est vdu take a long rest befc 
I'yiriO to pav off your debt 
■ H **l STOP 

3150 F'RINT "Yau now have some ca 
sh but the fai^ demands that ya 
u give it tothem to pay off your 

1 oan" " 

■I '.u STOP : GD TD 3140 
3170 PRINT "Vou have lost e, 
hlng. and rtOwyoU *ru Out on the ■ 
tl *et* m ttiaut a penny 

our pockets" ' 
3999 STOP 

5000 PRINT INVERSE 1; IM I | AT 
5,2s "ITEM'S AT 5,11 i INK 2s "3TQE> 
"tA'f 5,17l INK 01 "NO. "SAT 5,21; 
INK 3; "PRICE"; AT 5 , 27 i INI- 1 j "CO 
ST£" 

5010 FOR F=AAA TO BBB 
5020 PRINT AT f +7-aaa , 0; CHR* <f+ 
64 ) : : r ( f J |" " ( z t f > 

5030 NE*T f 
5040 INPUT "Select wlhat you need 

and press the (<By or ^0~ to qu 
it ";v* 

5053 IF v*»"0" THEN RETURN 
5060 LET v=(CD0E vf!-64 
5045 IF-" v saa Oft v -bbft THEN 00 
TO 5040 

5070 PRINT AT v+7-aaa ,2 1 ; p ( v) 
5080 INPUT ("Hon fflany "jK*(v}f a 
do you wish" '"to order " > { aiPOUn 
t 

50B2 IF amount' THEN 00 TD 500 


5BB5 IF 500-z <v> -amount ; I THEN 
PRINT4^1| "You have not enough ro 

om on the shelves for that amoun 

t"i PAUSE 200* GO TO S0FJ0 

5090 PRINT AT v+7-aaa , 1 7t amount : 

AT v+7-aaa , 13; amount+E ( v) 

5100 LET cost =p ( v) » amount 

3110 IF cost -cash THEN GO TD 13 

70 

5120 PR TNT AT v*7-aa#,2A( cost 

5130 LET cash=cash-co»t 

5135 LET z (v)=z (v)+amount. 

5140 PRINTS I; "You have £"ica*ht 

" cash left" 

3150 PAUSE 100 

5160 GD TD 5040 

6000 PRINT "You cannot precede t 

o run your shop because you hay 

e not made enough money this we 

el to pay your own wages. Con* 

eguently youhave died of hunger 

as you coli Id not buy your own foo 
d" 



m 



SINCLAIR USER August 19SS 






INITIALISATION 
'a" >-8b REM If 
machine code 
'USR "a'^by the 
theflitsee also 



"a": LET line-0 
rotated; LET d 



10 REM ROUTINE 
20 CLEAR (USR ' 
your program has 
routines replace 
start address of 
line 50) 

30 REM Insert any machine code 
loads here 
50 LET top^USR 
: LET col=0: LET 
*="1 M : LET z*="" 

100 REM Your program starts 
here and replaces lines 110-190 
110 LET line=3: LET col =3; LET 
zS="Multi"s GO SUB 9000 

120 LET line=3: LET cnl=9t LET 
z *="Di recti anal " : LET rotate=90i 
LET d*="d": GO SUB 9000 
130 LET line=13; LET col=7: LET 
2*="Print M i LET rotate=lB0: LET 
dS="l": GO SUB 9000 
140 LET line=13i LET col-1: LET 
z*="Sc Rotation": LET rotate-270 
: LET dS="u 1 ' : BO SUB 9000 

150 LET line=7: LET col-5: LET 
z*-"*"; LET rotate=0: LET d*='*r" 
: GO SUB 9000 

160 LET line=8: LET col=6s LET 
*#»"t"« LET ratate=90: GO SUB 90 

00 

170 LET line=9: LET col =5* LET 
z#="f"i LET rotate=ta0: GO SUB 9 

000 

1S0 LET line=8: LET col =4: LET 
z*=" ]"i LET rotate=270: GO SUB 9 
000 

1V0 STOP 
B999 REM This is the last line 
your program can use 
9000 REM PRINT ROUTINE 
9010 IF line<0 OR line>2l OR lin 
eOlNT line THEN LET line=0 
9020 IF COl<0 OR col >3l OR COl<> 
INT col THEN LET col =0 
9030 IF rotate<>90 AND rotateOl 
80 AND ratate<>270 THEN LET rot 
ate=B 

FOR a=l TO B 

POKE top-a,PEEK (USR "a M +(a 



9040 

9050 
-1) ) 
9060 
9070 
90B0 

THEN 
R* 144 
9090 PRINT 
9100 IF d# 
TO 9140 

9110 IF line=2i*(d*="r 
=31#<d#="r M ) THEN LET 



NEXT a 

FOR Z=l TO LEN I* 

IF rotateOO AND z#<zK>" " 
GO SUB 9210: LET z*lz)=CH 



AT 



line, col ; z* <z) 
OR d*="d" THEN 



G 



) AND col 

line=21*( 



d*="l"'): LET col=31*(d*="l M ) t GO 

TO 9160 
9120 IF eol=31*<d*-"r w > THEN LE 
T line=line+l-2#(d*="l M ) : LET co 
1=31* <d*="l ") : GO TO 9160 
9130 LET col=cQl+l-2#(d*= ,, l■ , ): G 

D TO 9160 

9140 IF Xine=21*(d*="d"> THEN L 
ET line=21* (d*="u" ) : GO TD 9160 
9150 LET line=line+l-2#(d*=* , u") : 

GO TO 9160 
9160 NEXT Z 

9170 FOR a=l TO B: POKE (UBR "a" 
+(a-l)) t PEEK (top-a)s NEXT a 
9180 RETURN . 



=g Program Printout 







<?> 



# -% 



w 






THIS UTILITY by Dave Trebilcock of Sale in 
Cheshire for any Spectrum allows strings to be 
printed in any direction on the screen. Charac- 
ters stored in the Spectrum ROM or the user -defined 
character area can be stated in this fashion. 

The following variables must be set up before the 
routine can be used: 

Line and col used to hold start position of printing. 
rotate degree of character rotation C90\ 180, 

270). 
d$ direction of printing: r= right and left; 

d=down; u=up 
i$ string to be printed. 

Lines 100-190 contain a demonstration. The utility 
can be added to any Basic program and starts at line 
9000. It is set up using ihe variables shown above. 



9200 REM ROTATE 

9210 DIM a<8 f B> 

9220 PRINT #1; PAPER INT (PEEK 2 

3624/8); INK INT (PEEK 23624/8); 

AT l,3I;z*(z) 

9230 FDR a=0 TO 7 

9240 LET s=12B: LET cnt=PEEK (22 

527-256*a) 

9250 FOR b=l TO 8 

9260 IF rotate=270 THEN IF cnt> 

s-1 THEN LET a<b,0-al-i: LET en 

t=rnt-5 

9270 IF ratate=l60 THEN IF cnt> 

s-1 THEN LET a (B-a,9-b > =1 : LET 

cnt=cnt-s 

9280 IF rotate=90 THEN IF cnt>5 

-1 THEN LET a (9-b f a+l ) =1 : LET c 

nt=cnt-s 

9290 LET s-s/2 

9300 NEXT b: NEXT a 

9310 FOR a=0 TO 7; LET tot-0: LE 

T 5=120: FOR b=l TO B 

9320 LET tot=tot + 5*(a(a+l ,bK>0) 

9330 LET s-s/2 

9340 NEXT b: POKE USR "a^^-a), 

tot; NEXT a 

9350 RETURN 



SINCLAIR USER August 198$ 



SI 



2B POKE 236,0"?, 10: FDKE 2365G , B 
: GO SUB <?0«0: GD SUB 9900: GO S 
UB 20001 GO TO 25 

21 BO SUB B900: GD BUB 2000 

23 FAPER Si ELS l POKE 23624,8 
: BORDER 1 

40 SO SUB 6000; GO SUB 6050 
1000 LET Kt*Xl LET ¥1=¥ 
1010 PRINT AT Yl ,3(1* " (2*spt H |AT 
Yl*l,Xt"<Z*»p> " 

1021 IF IN 3276A=190 THEN QO BU 
B 3000 

1022 LET X=X+iIN 57342= 1 90J - Ct N 
57342=1691: LET Y=Y*([N 65022-19 
0h - < IN 64510=190> 

1023 IF PU=1 THEN GO SUB 1510 

1025 LET Y-Y+<Y<1>-<Y>16> 

1026 LET X = X- (X>30)+ ( X<0) 

1027 LET 1-USR 60000 

1029 IF ATTR I ¥ , X ) <>4B OR ATTR i 
Y+I,X)<>40 OR ATTR IY T X41X?40 O 
ft ATTR <Y + UX + 1><>40 THEN GD SU 
B 7000 

1030 PRINT AT Y.Xt* jiR H [ftT Y+1,X( 

" £■ T " 



1031 IF TI=1 THEN BO TO 5000 

1032 IF TK10O THEN PRINT AT 21 
,16; PAPER 7; H (sp>'": IF TK10 TH 
EN PRINT AT 21 , 15| PAPER 7t " <*p 

) " 

1035 IF Pg=l THEN GU SUB 1500 

1040 LET TI=TI-1; PRINT AT 21,14 

t PAPER 7lTI 

1090 GO TO 1000 

1500 PRINT AT V+E.Xt "t L - 'tAT Y+3, 

1505 RETURN 

1510 PRINT AT Yl+2,Klf PAPER 5t " 

(spJ';AT Yl+3,Xi; " (s.p}" 

1520 RETURN 

2000 PAPER 0: CLS 5 INK 7i POKE 

23i24,15: CLB : BDRDfcH 1 

2010 PRINT AT 0,12| BRIGHT 1("IS 

OTOPE" 

2020 PRINT AT 2,0; INK 6; " In thi 

s game you ttha mini sub) must r 

fKUf c*nisters -full of Ridioa 

CtlVB 150topB5.PlCk UP tfl*C*ni«t 

wrt from amqnqst the weed and ta 

ke them tn ydur ship above" 
2030 PRINT AT 7,0; INK 4;"Vou mu 
5t campletB this fcMk in a Ctf t 
in time or the Isotopes mill b 
en ante tao djngerouE." 
2035 PRINT AT 10,0; INK 3i "Unf or 
tunately the Isotopes are place 
d in Blue Octopu* infested water - 
s and y&u mu«t avoid them' 1 

2040 PRINT AT 1 9 , 3 ; " Q=up ; A=do*n ; 
Q=lBft)P=riqhfj AT 1 B , 7 ; " SPflCE=p 
I etc up /drop" 

2041 PRINT AT 14,12;; INK *H"JJ15 
•■p) H l INK 2; "> H4*tp)''| INK 7 t " 
(3»SpJ &£*_" 

2042 PRINT AT 15,12; INK 4; "^M5» 
■p)"i INK 2l "MNC4#mp> "i INK 7l" < 
3*gp) 5T " 

2043 PRINT AT 1 6 ,01 " !»p> OCTOPUS < 
3#sp ) WEED (3*5p)CAN<5«sp>5UB" 
204"? LET IN-B 

2030 PRINT AT 21*0; " <5*sp i PRESS 
KEY IS) TO PLAY" 

2051 PRINT AT 14,3; INK 5t ".EF " ;A 
T 15,3; " GU* 

2052 PRINT AT 0, 12( INK lNt N ISQT 
OPE": LET IN=IN+1: IF IN=B THEN 

LET IN=0 

2053 PAUSE 6 

2054 IF INKEY*-"S" THEN BO TO 2 
090 

2056 PRINT AT 14,3; INK 5; " a B_ " ;fl 

T 15,31 -CO" 

ZB57 PAUSE hi SO TO 2051 

2090 PAPER 5 l CLS l BORDER ll IN 

i 0: RETURN 

IF ¥-16 THEN GO TO 3010 

IF Y=l THEN GO TD 3100 

IF V<>16 OR VOl THEN RETU 




DANGEROUS radioactive material lies buried in 
the weeds at the bottom of the ocean. The sub is 
ready and waiting. Bring the canisters up to the 
ship before the time runs out - hut beware the blue 
octopi. Their tentacled touch is deadly. Isotopes runs on 
the 48 K Spectrum, 

The program uses our special abbreviations for graphics 
characters, so please read the instructions an the first page of 
Program Printout before entering the listing. 




'-cva&xxwi. 



3000 

3001 

30'02 
RN 

'010 



IF ATTR <Y+Z,XK>42 OR ATTR 



<Y+2,X+1)<>42 THEN BD TP 3190 
3020 LET PU-=1: POKE 60230, INT (R 
ND*faH-16: FOR n-10 TO 150 STEP 1 
0t POKE 60220, lit LET 1 =USR 60227 
t NEXT ni PRINT AT Y+2, X; " (2#sp> 
"[AT V+3,X) ■' (2»sp) ": BORDER I 
3030 RETURN 

3100 IF X<10 OR 1O20 DR PU-0 THE 
N RETURN 

3110 PRINT AT Yl+2,Xl;"(2»mp)"lA 
T ¥l+3,Xl|"<2*»p) ■ 
3115 POKE 60230, INT <RND#6)+16l 
FOR n=150 TO IB STEP -IB: POKE 6 
0228, n: LET 1 =U5R 60227: NEXT ni 

BORDER 1 
3120 LET PU-0 l LET SC-5O100: PR 
INT AT 21,26; PAPER 7|iSC( PAPER 
5* LET CAN-CAN* 1: LET PUF-FT-CAN 
t IF CAN=FT+1 THEN GO TO 4000 
3170 RETURN 
4000 REM DONE 

4010 CLB ; PRINT AT B, 11 J "NELL D 
ONE* "| AT 10,3i M ¥OU HAVE RECDVERE 
D ALL THE RADIO-ACTIVE IS 

O TOPES. " 



4020 PRINT AT 14, 7[ INK 1 1 " YOUR 

TIKE WAS ";TI 

4035 PRINT AT 16,11) INK 2) FLA5 

H 1; "BONUS "' jTI: LET SC=SC+TI 

4030 FOR n-9 TO 90t POKE 601Bl,n 

■ LET 1-USR 60179: NEXT n 

4040 PRINT W|" PRESS A KEY TD » 

DVE ON TO NEXT RECOVERY 

SITE" 
4045 BORDER 1* PAUSE 
4050 LET CAN-Bi LET FT-FT+l t LET 

FUF=FT: LET PC-PC-3( IF FT-9 TH 
EN LET FT-9 

4053 IF PC<1 THBN LET PC- 1 
4060 CLS » LET Y-ll LET T I -200+5 
0#FTl LET Z=Z+1: GO SUB 8900 1 LE 
T X=15: GO TD 30 

5000 CLS : PRINT AT 10,7; FLASH 
If INK 2l*YDU ARE OUT OF TIME" 
5010 PRINT AT 12,4; "THE RADIO-AC 
TTVE ISOTOPES HAVE REACHED 

A DANGEROUSLY HIGH 

LEVEL" ■■- MISSION ABANDONE 

D " 
5015 FOR n-130 TO 9 STEP -li PQK 



82 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 










iSiWlS 



LET CAN-Bl 
LET F'UF=FT 



PQ*E 




E 6B181,m LET 1HJSR 601 79i NEXT 

n 
5820 PAUSE 600) GO TD 72MB 

t.aae for r*»B to puFi for n*pc to 

PC+PUF*3 STEP 3 I PRINT AT l8,Ni 
INK 2{ « > Lj_ 'l NEXT N: NEXT M 
6001 FOfTM^B TO PUFi FDR N-PC TD 
PC+PUF-3 STEP 3; PRINT AT 19, N[ 
INK 2l" MU" ; NEXT Nt NEXT M 
6082 INK 4: FOR W"0 TO 32 STEP 3 
: PRINT AT 16,N;"_i"l NEXT Ni FOR 
N-B TO 32 STEP 3l PRINT AT 17,N 
f »J«| NEXT N 

6B03 FOR N-8 TO 32 STEP 3s PRINT 
AT 18, N;"^' t NEXT N: FOR N-B TO 
32 STEP 3l PRINT AT 19,N|"J,"i N 
EXT N 

hB04 INK 0: RETURN 
6858 PRINT AT 2B t Bl PAPER h; L* 
6055 PRINT AT 21, Bl PAPER 7|L*I 
PRINT AT 21. Bj PAPER 7;"SUBS=" P L 
1 ( - TinE-"|Tl(" SCORE- H l.SC 

6060 PRINT AT 0,10s '^D < 1 B**p >£." 
6 IBB RETURN 
70B0 POKE 68139,40: LET Ll-LI-1: 



PRINT AT 21, 5| PAPER 7jLi 
7BB5 LET CAR-CAN 
7010 LET 1-USR 6B201 
7B2B IF LI=B THEN SO TO 720B 
7030 LET PU-Bl LET Y-li LET X = 16 
1 CLS i GO TO 3B 

7 200 PAPER 0: POKE 23624 t 0t PAUS 
E 3B01 
7210 PRINT AT 2B,0| PAPER 0| INK 

fc ■ ■ SAME OVER 

II 

7220 POKE 60230,171 FOR N-B TO 1 
9t POKE 6022B,17B: PRINT AT 21, B 
; PAPER B;Lfs LET L=USR 3200: RA 
ND0H1ZE USR 60227: NEXT Ni BDRDE 
H I 

723B POKE 6B LB 1,255: PRINT AT 7, 
5; INK 5; "HELL DONE A 6DDD TRY"! 

FOR N=0 TD 4* LET L=USR 601791 
NEXT N 

7235 BORDER 1 

724B PAUSE 30i PRINT AT 10, B; IN 
K 4 j "YOU SCORED "iSC: LET L=USR 
68091 
730B PRlNT^Bs" PRESS ANV KEY T 



D PLAY AGAIN" 
7385 INK. 0: LET 7_*2l 
LET PC-lBl LET FT«2l 
t LET y=3t LET X=16: 
7306 FDR N =42000 TO 42B5B; 
N,0: NEXT N 

7310 PAUSE 0: LET Ll-9: LET TI-2 
00: LET BC=B: SO TO 21 
8900 POKE 4?0BB,4: POKE 42001,14 
; POKE 42B02,l: POKE 42003,0* PD 
KE 42B04,lf POKE 42085,253 
8*? IB CLS : LET a=42B05 
8915 FDR + = 1 TO t. 
B92B POKE a, INT IRND«29+2J 
B<?30 POKE a+l,lNI <RND#10+4) 

6948 POKE a+2,1 

B95B POKE a +3,1 

B960 IF NOT PEEK (a+2) AND NOT P 

EEK (a+3) THEN DO TO 3940 

B970 POKE *+4,| 

0980 POKE a+5,255 

89B5 LET *«*+5 

H99B NEXT « 

8995 RETURN 

900B LET tat -01 FDR n=60B0B TO 6 

0247: READ a: PUKE n,a: LET tot» 

tnt+a: NEXT n 

9B1B IF tat<">2B578 THEN PRINT " 

ERDRR IN DATA DO NOT RUN": STDP 

9B20 DATA 221,33,16,164,221,126, 

0,254,255,40,34,95,221,86, 1,6,2, 

62 , 22 , 2 1 5 , 1 22,2 1 5 , 1 23 , 2 15 , 62 , 3 2 , 

215.62.32.215.20. 16.240.221 .33.2 

2 1 , 35 , 2 21 , 33 , 22 1 1 35 , 22 1 , 35 , 24 , 2 1 
5,221 ,33, 16, 164,221 , 126 

9B30 DflTfi 0,254,255,288,221,1 ". 
2,254,255,40,4,254,31 ,32,3,221 . 1 
26 ,2 ,237,68,221, 119,2,221 ,126,1 , 

254.2.40.4.254.14.32.6.221 .126.3 
,237, 6B, 221, 119,3,221, 126, B. 221, 
1 34 2 221 119 

9050 DATa'b,221, 126,1.221, 134,3, 

221. 119.1.14.144.221.283.4.126.4 
0, 1 8 , 22 1 , 283 , 4 , 19B , 62 , 4 , 1 29 , 79 , 2 
4 , 4 , 22 1 , 203 , 4 , 254 , 221 , 1 26 , 4 , 203 , 
191, l90,40,50,i43,92,221,B6,l,6, 
2,62,22,215 

9060 DATA 122,213,221,126,0,215, 
121,215,12, 121,215, 1 2, 28, 16, 230, 

22 1 , 35 , 22 1 , 35 , 22 1 , 35 , 221 , 33 , 22 1 , 
35, 195, 145,234 

907B DATA 243,14,255,62,16,237,1 
63 , 65 , 16 , 234 ,62 , 7 , 237 , 1 63 , 65 , 1 6 , 
254 , 1 3 , 32 , 239 , 25 1 , 20 1 , 6 , 35 , 1 97 , 3 
3,0,3,17,1 , 8, 229, 205 ,181, 3*229 , 1 
7, 16,0,167,237,82,32,248,193.16, 
233 ,281, 14, B, 62, 16,211, 254 
908B DATA 65,16,254,62,7,211,234 
,65, 16,254, 13,32,239,2B1 
9188 RESTORE 9100: FOR n=USR »m* 

TO USR "It"* 7 ' HEAD ■" PO^E "i*l 

NEXT n 
9110 DATA 8,0,0,0,1,3,5,71,0,0,0 
, , 1 2B , 1 92 , 1 64 , 234 , 1 66 , 30 , I 1 , I SB 
, 2B1 , 1 6 , 1 7 , 34 . 1 B5, 1 1 2 , 246 , 2 1 7 , 36 
, 34 , 1 7 , 1 2 

9120 DATA 0,0,0,0,33,67,69,37,0, 
0,0,0, 120, 195,164, 16B.39, 159, 139 
, 116,9,^7,98,12,233,242,244,216, 
37,34,32, 16 

9130 DATA 0,B2,44.S6,6B,12B,12B, 
60 ,60 , 1 20 , 120,60 , 68 , 1 20 , i 20 , 60 , 2 
3 ,63 , 1 26 , 255, 254 , 254 , 254 , 1 85, I 52 
, 252 , 1 26 , 235 , 1 27 , 1 27 , 1 27 , 137, 1 85 
,235,234,235,255,120,63,25, 157,2 
55 , 1 27, 255 ,255 , 30 , 232 , 132 
<?140 DATA 255,127,63,31,15,7,3,1 
, 252 , 24E , 244 , 252 , 244 , 240 , 234 ,0,0 
,7, 15,28,60,231,127,235,0, 128,24 
B , 1 32 , 1 76 , 1 7 7 , 1 6 1 , 255 , 104 , 23H , 1 
9,235,104,63,31,12,213,253,214,2 
52,240,240,224,96 
9500 LET Z=2; LET X»l6t LET V-ll 

LET LI =5: LET 5C=B: LET T 1=2001 
9510 LET L»--<32#*pr : LET F*U=-0 
992B LET CAN=B: LET PC-ll LET FT 
=2s LET PUF-FT 
995B RETURN 

9"?99 SAVE "ISOTOPE": PUKE Z3736, 
1 B 1 ; GO TO 9999 



SINCLAIR USER August 198$ 



»3 




INTRODUCING an ancient puzzle with a new twist for your QL. 
The idea in Slipped Discs by R. Hartill from Pontypridd, Wales, is 
to take the discs from the first peg, which is on the Left of the screen, 
and reassemble them in the same order on the third peg, on the right. 

Unlike the original puzzle, the Towers of Hanoi, you can select the 
number of discs you require. Once you have made your choice the QL will 
calculate the optimum number of moves in which the puzzle can be 
solved , 



10 REMark Tower O-f Brahma by Rah 

ert H*rtill 

20 REMark 26 Dyn«* Road ,Rhydy* el 

in, Pontypridd 

IB MODF Q: WINDOW 43B- 150 ,3S,55 

419 OPEM#3 , SCRi W I NDQW#3 , 271 ,24* 13 

5.20 

50 DFEN*4, SCR (WINDOW* 1,2 70,24,14 

0,25 

bB IN^^iPRPER^S.lsCSIZEES^,! 

70 FAPEF^^PAPEftfl^aiPAFER BlS 

CALE 34, 5, a 

BB PR IN1#B, "Enter amount of disc 

m r equired. ": tNPUNlte , *<no 

90 IP amo:4 THEN PRIMT#a,"4 OT HI 

or* discs please. "(60 TO SB 

IBB lnwfeStfPRINT|ta,"Lea5t moves -- 

";1om; ". Press any key."; PAUSE 

S10 DIM disc tamo) icount=-l:FDR n 

=1 TD jmo;disc!nJ=1 

120 DIM a(amo),b(amu) 

130 FOR nM TO amo 

140 [jval =15+(a™o-n)* (30/*lltoJ 

150 a(n> =3S): bin) "bv«l 

160 NEST n 

17B CLS(|B: screen :finttr move 

190 DEFine PROCecfiire enter_mov* 

19B CSIZE 3,liINK 7lAT 1,1: PRINT 

TO 4; 1:TQ 14r2|T0 23; 3 
200 CLS#4:CL5#5: I Nt#J , i 1 BGRDERffe 
, liTtCSIZEfto.S.^PRlNTffej "Nov** 



taken so far "(Count 

210 na*l 

220 FOR n=l TD amai IF dl»C<n)<>3 

THEN no=0 
23B IF no THEN FINISH 

240 Cl_9^B:CSI?Pt0,H, 1:ST*0,] .l:f 
RtNTMOi ■Movina from column "JlFL 
flBH.TJIfB, l:PFtlNTlWl""»"|iFLAEHflB,0 



REPeat loop 

row=CuDE<INKEY*} 

IF row=232 THEN RUN 

IF ro*#-4"? THEN cnl=l:EXIT 

IF ro*J = 50 THEN cal=2:£XIT 

IF row-51 THEN col=3:EXIT 



250 
260 
270 

2B0 
I oop 
290 

9 oop 

300 

loop 

310 END REP*at loop 
320 BEEP 1000,5 

330 AT#B, 1,22iPRINt40| "to column 
■;:FLftSH#B,lfPRlNT*a,-?" ( t FLASH 

340 AT$B,l,20lPRINl#0,col 

350 REP«at press 

360 row2=C00£(]NKEV*> 

370 IF rcw2=49 AND colOl THEN 

eal to=l:EXlT pre*! 
3S0 "lF row2-30 AND eal<>2 THEN 

COl to=2:EKIT preM 
390 " IF TOW2-S1 AMD cal<>3 THEN 



eal_tB»3jEXIT press 
400 END REPeat press 
410 ATjh> t I , 12iPRINT*k8,col_toieEE 
P 1B00,5: safe=0 

423 taf e = 0s oovi _ -from col,col_to« 
en ter_mnve 

432 END DEFin* •nttr.novt 
440 REMark DRAW 

SCREEN 

453 DEFine PROCedure *cram 
460 cou.nt=caunt + l :CL5: BORDER 1,7 
tk-1 
470 FOR p = amo TD 1 STEP -llfttae*. 

I tamu p.jfp) , b<p> 
400 END DEFin* screen 
490 REMark draw discs 

■_-3H DL^irre PRDCedur* Oltci <*,*. 

y) 

SIB r*di«l+33-*«f29/**o) 

520 1=30 /a mo 

53B k=k+l:IF k=B THEW k"2 

540 FILL Oi INK BiCIRCLE K,y,r«di 

+1 ,.3,1.52 

55B FOR n = y TO y+1-lsFlLL Be INK 

kt CIRCLE x ,r>,r*di ,.3, 1.52l CIRCLE 

k , n , radi - 1 , . 5 , 1 .52: NEXT n 
560 FILL H INK kl CIRCLE H,y+1-1, 
radi , .5,1, 52l FILL 

570 FILL 0: INK Bi CIRCLE »,ytl,r» 
di+1 ,,5, 1,52 
5BB END DEFine discs 
590 REMark The movement 
600 DEFine PROCedure mcive_*ram ( 
ir ,t> 
610 FDR n=l TO amo ilF disc(nl-f 

r THEN »*+*»l 

420 IF safe=fl THEN error _tr*pt RE 

Turn 

430 FOR n=amc TD 1 STEP -It IF di 

sc(n)=4r THEN *rtd I »C -n 

640 FOR n-I TO *mdimctIF diactnl 

= t AND smd i sc >n : errar_tr«pl RETur 

n 

650 FOR ^=1 TD 3 

660 IF t«v THEN 

670 FOR H= amo TO 1 STEP -1 

6B0 IF srodisc=w THEN b<w)-)Sl*<H 

)=3fl+( (v-l)*60> 

690 NEXT H 

700 END IF 

710 END FOR v 

720 FOR n=l TO amo 

730 FOR c=l TO hid 

740 IF due in) -t AND Mdimc-c TH 

EN h(c)=b.lc)+3B/*«n 

7SB NEXT c 

760 NEXT ft 

77B di sc Ismdl sc ) =t i screen 

7B0 END DEFin* «ov*_*ro« 

790 REMark The end 

B00 DEFine PR0C*dur* FINISH 

BIB BEEP 3B0BB, 512, 512, 512, 312,5 

12,512: CLS«j2 

B20 FLASH#B, 1 iCSIZE0B,B, 1 iCL9#Bi 

PRINTl|0;Ta 4|"YOU FINISHED IN "f 

count t" MOVES ";FLASH0g,0 

B30 IF count=lDH THEN FLASH 1 : PR 

INT"Vau finimh«d in th* t*«*t po 

ssihle moves ," ) 1 oh: FLASH 

H40 PRINT"PRESB V FDR ANOTHER 

BO OR "N- TP OUiT" 

B3B REPeat press 

B6B KEV#-INKEV* 

B7B IF KEV*» N y" OR KEY^-Y" TH 

EN RUN 

B90 IF KEY*="N" OR KEY*-"n" TH 

EN ST DP 

090 END REPeat prftf 

9BB END DEFin* FINISH 

910 REMark Error tree 

92B DEFine PROCedure error tr*p 

930 CLSfta:PRlNT0fl,"CnI "|COl|" t 

o col "icol.toi" i* illegal" 

940 FLASH#3 , 1 : PR I NT$3 , " Press 

any key. " t FLASHES , Bl PAUSE 

950 END DEFine errnr.trap 

960 DEFin* PROCedur* lowest; low= 

B 

97B FOR h-1 TD a«iDilo«=]D«t2+l 

9B0 END DEFine 



84 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



SHARPEN up your wits for 
Target by David Myles of 
Methil Leven, Fife, The 
program runs on a 48K Spectrum 
or Spectrum Plus, and is that rare 
thing, an educations] game which is 
actually fun to play. 

You are given a row of numbers 
and must choose two by firing at 
them. You may then add, substract 
or multiply (hem to try and get as 
close as possible to a target number. 
The game is for two players and 
besides improving your menial 
arithmetic it also contains plenty of 
scope for clever strategy. Full in- 
structions are provided in the 
program h 

The gams uses our special abbre- 
viations for graphics characters so 
please read the first page of Program 
Printout before entering the listing. 



1 CLS : POKE 33656*8* DIM N* < 
2,7): BORDER 0: PAPER B: INK 7i 
BRIGHT B: INVERSE 0: OVER 0: FLA 
SH 0: CLS : PRINT AT 9,4; FLASH 
E; PAPER 4( INK 1; BRIGHT I ; "S T 
DP THE TAP E" ;AT 11,7s P 
APER 6; INK 2t FLASH 8; "TARGET H 
AS LOADED 1 ' 

Z FOR A«B TO 7: READ B: POKE 
UER "A*+A,B: NEXT A: DATA 14,24, 
60, 68, 126,126, 255, 255 

3 FDR A TD 50.0: NEXT A: FOR 
A=B TD 3B: PRINT AT 9 , A I INK 2; 

■'(■ptii": BEEP . B1,A: BEEP . B05,0 
: NEXT A: PRINT AT 9,31 ; " t*p> " I 
FOR A=34B TO El STEP -It PR J NT AT 
11, A; INt 2: £±<5P> "* BEEP .01, A: 

BEEP .Bl,-lBi NEXT A: PRINT AT 
1 1 ,0; • tap} - 

10 PLOT 15,111: DRAM 0,25l DRA 
W 23,0: DRAW 8,-25: DRAW -25,0 

11 PLOT 55,111: DRAW 0,25t DRA 
W 25,0: DRAW B.-25: DRAW -25,0 

12 PLOT 93, It I) DRAW 8,25: DRA 
W 25 t Bl DRAW 0,-25: DRAW -25,0 

13 PLOT 139,111) DRAW B,Z5: DR 
AW 25, Bs DRAW 0,-25: DRAW -25,0 

14 PLOT 175,111: DRAW B,23s DR 
AU 25,. «t DRAW B,-25= DRAW -25,0 

15 PLOT 215, 111: DRAW 0,25: DR 
AW 25, B: DRAW B,-25: DRAW -25, B 

20 LfT B=B: LET A*= - ' TARGET" 3 F 
OR A=3 TO SI STEP 5 

21 LET b=b+ll PRINT AT IS, a; I 
Ni 2; "_£."! PLDT a*B+4,32: DRAW 0, 
78 

22 PRINT AT 5, A- If. PAPER 2l IN 
K 7s M3*sp) ";AT 6, A-l; " (3«»p J "; A 
T 7,.A-l;"<3«*pl " 

23. PRINT AT 6»A: II*; 7t PAPER 
Z;A*(P> 

24 BEEP .01 ,0 

25 PRINT AT ie,*:"<*P> "; PLOT 
OVER l| 4*0+4,321 DRAW OVER lsB 

,7B 

26 IF A -26 THEN FOR C=A TO A+ 
4; PRINT AT 1B,C| INK 2;'lii H f BeE 
F .BI,A: PRINT AT lB,Cl " tap) " : N 
EXT C 

29 NEXT A 

^O OVER Bt PRINT AT 1B,B; PAPE 
R fa; INK 2; "WRITTEN BY DAVID MVL 
ES JUNE 1*95: AT 17,5; PAPER B: 
INI 7; 'A GAME FOR tWD PLAYERS" 

31 FDR a=0 TO 4BB: NEXT * 

35 PRINT AT 17,0; "WOULD YOU LI 
KE INSTRUCTIONS (Y/Nt "■ 

4(9 IF INkEYf" M V" OR INKEY* = "y" 
THEN GO TO 90B0 

4 1 IF INKEY*-"'N'" DR INKEV*»"n" 
THEN GO TD IBB 

43 GO TD 40 




GO TO 2BB 

LET A=12 

LET A*- HH " 

PAUSE B 

[F CDDE IN«EY*= 



IBB CLS 

1 85 PRINT AT B,5; INK 3; 
ENTER YOUR NAME" 1 [AT 1,B( 
LETTERS) "' 

186 PRINT AT 4,2j INK 5; 
I" 
1B7 
150 

160 
163 

TO 17B 

164 IF 
THEN 

5p) " 

165 
THEN 
166 
167 
lfaB 
149 

17B 

LET 



■PLAYER 



215 LET DE=T/6Bl FOR A-=B TO 
PRINT AT IB, 14; PAPER 2; INK 
BEEP . 0I,Aj/DEs NEXT A 

Z1B PRINT AT 19,14; PAPER 2; 
K 7; INT T 

219 LET P=l: LET B=I: LET P1=H: 

LET P2=*B 

222 PRINT AT B,5; FLASH 1; INK 
1[ PAPER 6! "ITS YDUR SHOT "*N#tP 



I 



13 THEN GO 



2B, IB; "PRESS SPACE 
TD FIRE"; FDR A-3 



COOE INKEY*=12 AND A>12 
LET A-A-li PRINT AT P,Aj"< 
SO TO 168 
IF A* 1 2 AND CODE INKEY*-12 

GO TD 160 
PRINT AT P.AitiMKEY* 
BEEP .1,11 LET A~A+1 
IF A=19 THEN DO TD 17H 
GO TD lfc« 

LET A*=""S FOR A=l2 TO 2B: 
B*=SCREEN* IP, A) 

NEXT At 



173 LET A*=A*+Bfl 

1 74 LET N* ( N » "A* 

175 BEEP .3,0: RETURN 
201 LET M=l: LET P=4: 

0: GO TD 2B4 

2B3 BORDER B: FOR A= 1 TO 
ORDER 2: BORDER h: BORDER 
DER 5: BORDER B: PAUSE U 
: GD TD 430 

LET N=2i LET P«>4: PRINT AT 
INK 55 "2U5#sp>"« GO SUB 15 



BO SUB 15 



50B: B 

4: BOR 

NEXT A 



204 
4,9; 


2B5 
CLS 

206 

20B 



LET A*=™ I3*mpl "J PAUSE IB: 



FDR A>=i5 TD 254 STEP 4B 
PLDT A,1U= DRAW fl,25i DRAW 

25,0: DRAW B,-2S» DRAW -25, B 

2B9 NEXT A 

21B PRINT AT 2,Bl INK 2; " I32*g3 
J" 

212 PRINT AT 17„Bf. INK l t PAPER 
2;'M32*g3,32*ig31" 

213 PRINT AT 17,12* PAPER 1\ IN 
K 7 S -TARGET"; AT IB, 12; ' <6-«p) " 

214 LET T» <RND»130>+5B: IF T>15 
OR T' 50 THEN 6D TD 214 



223 PRINT AT 
-|AT 21,10; " 
TO 31 STEP 5 

224 PRINT AT 6, A; PAPER B; INK 
AifINT (RND«9)+1: NEXT A 

225 FOR A=B TO 29: PAUSE 2 

226 PRINT AT It, A? INK 2f~t«p)F 

H 

Z27 IF INKEYJO-lapf THEN NEX 
T A: PRINT AT 16 ,3Bj " (2"*p> "' GD 
TO 225 
229 PLDT A*B+11,4B; DRAW fl,61: 

229 IF ATTR (6 t A+ll<>6 THEN Bt 
EP . 081,60: GO TD 235 

230 PRINT AT S,Aj PAPER 2l INK 
7j " I3*5p) "lAT 6, A; OVER l;"<3#»p 
>"- r AT 7,A| OVER &ft~S**p>" 

231 BEEP -2,Bl LET A* <B) "SCREEN 
* Ci,A+l> : LET B-B+l 

232 IF B=3 AND F= 1 THEN LET B- 
B; LET P-Zj 90 TO 3BB 

233 IF B=3 AND P=Z THEN LET B- 
Bl LET P-l; GD TO 3BB 

235 PLOT OVER i;A*B+li,#9: DRA 
W OVER lfB,61: GO TO 226 

30B FOP G=B TO IB: l«:XT Gl PLOT 
OVER l;A*a+Ll,4B: DRAW OVER 1 
tB.fal: PRINT AT 2B, 1 Bj " 1 1 1 *«p> u i 
AT 21,lBs"(ll*»pJ '" 

3B5 PRINT AT L9,24j PAPER 2l IN 
K 7iN*<2)iAT 20,24t" SCORE "(AT 
21 ,24; " t7*spr' S.AT Zl,26lP2 

3B6 PRINT AT l9,Bl PAPER 2l I Nk 

7;N«tl);AT 2B,B}" SCORE ";AT 21 
,8; " C7«!ip)";AT 2l T 2iPl 

3fl7 LET C=VAL A* I 1 1 « LET D=UAL 

POH2) 

31B PRINT AT B,B("A=ADD,5-SUBTR 

iimiinUi'ii on page #fi 









SINCLAIR LSER August 1985 



BS 



Program Printout 



continued from page 85 
ACT & n=HULTIPLV H 

311 IF INKEY*="A" THEM LET A=C 
+ D; PRINT AT 0,31; "A": LET B*-" + 
'■; GO TO 320 

312 IF 1NKEY*="S" THEN LET A-C 
-D: PRINT AT 0,31; "5": LET B*-"- 
" : GO TO 320 

313 IF INKEY**"N" THEN LET A-C 
• D: PRINT AT 0,31f"M"t LET B*= - X 

: SO TO 323 
31-* 60 TD 311 

320 PRINT AT 0,0; " (32»*p> '": FDR 
B=4 TD Hit PRINT AT B,B; " I32«»p 

) "l NEXT B 

321 PRINT AT B,B;"TYPE IN YOUR 
ANSWER" 

322 PLOT 7B, 111: DRAW 0,23 1 BRA 
H 47, 0: DRAW 0,-25 1 DRAW -47, B 

323 PRINT AT fi, IB; C; B*; D; AT 6,1 
5;"=" 

324 IF A<lfl THEN LET L-Sl SO T 
324 

323 LET L=17 

3=6 PLOT 135,111; DRAW t 25t DR 
AW I6*L.H: DRAW 0,-25: LET L=L + t 
hi DRAM L,0 

72 7 IF C-Q AND B*="-" THEN PR I 
NT AT 6, 17; •-" 

329 IF A 9 THEN LET V»lBl LET 
X = 1 9 s [iO TO 33B 

329 LET V»17l LET X=iB 

330 FOR G=V TO X: PAUSE B: LET 
D*=INKEY* 

331 IF INKEV*<CHR* 4S DR INKEY* 
■>CHR* 57 THEN PRINT AT 6,10;"(b| 

pi" I IF A>9 THEN PRINT AT 6,19| 
" (sp) '; GO TO 33B 

332 PRINT AT 6,B|9f 

333 NEXT G 

334 IF V-1B THEN PRINT AT 5,17 
; OVER 1; PAPER 2) INK 7;"<4#»p) 
";AT 6,17; " (4»sp) u f AT 7,17;"<4Mi 
P> " 

335 IF V-17 THEN PRINT AT 5,17 
; OVER If PAPER 2; INK 7|" (3*sp) 
"(At i,17;"<3#*p) " f flT 7,J7 5 " (3»a 
pi" 

334, IF V=ia THEN LET A*="e2«Sp 
l"l LET A* < 1 ) =5CREENf td>,lB): LE I 
T A*(2)=SCREENj* C6.19) 

337 IF V = 17 THEN LET M="(spr' 
: LET Aid i -SCREEN* (6,1B> 

ZZQ IF V=17 AND B*-"- 1 ' THEN LE 
T A* = M2#sp)": LET A* 1 1 1 -SCREEN* 

<6,17t: LET A* (2) -SCREEN* (6, IB 
J 

340 IF VAL A*"A THEN PLOT B7,4 
7: DRAW 0,25: DRAW 73, B: DRAW 0, 
-25: DRAW -73,8: PRINT AT 13,11* 

PAPER 2; INK 7i"(9« 5 pl";AT 14,1 
If" CORRECT ";AT 15, 1 1 ; " <9«sp> "; 

FOR F=-3B TD 30: BEEP .B1,ABS F 
; NEXT F 

35B IF VAL A*OA THEN PLOT 95, 
47: DRAW 0,25t DRAW 57,0! DRAW 
,-2Sl DRAW -57,0s PRINT AT 13,12 1 
; PAPER 2i INK 7; " f 7*sp> " j AT 14, 
12|' WRONG ";AT 15, 12 t " (7*sp) " : 
BEEP l,-25t BEEP 1,-70: GO TO 35 | 

351 IF VAL A*=A AND P-l THEN F 
OR 2=P2 TO P2+Ai PRINT AT 21.2A| 

PAPER 2; INK 7;?; BEEP .01, 4B: 
NEXT 2; LET F2-P2+A 

352 IF VOL A*=A AND P=2 THEN F 
OR Z=P1 TO P1*A: PRINT AT 21,2; 
PAPER 2: INK 7| It BEEF ,01,481 N 
EXT It LET Pl=Pl+A 

353 PRINT AT 21,26; PAPER 2| IN 
K 7 t P2?AT 21,2;P1 

354 IF PI- INT T OR P2-1NT T THE 

N GO TO 400 

355 PRINT AT 0, 0; - ( 32*5*) 1 " ; FOR 
B-4 TO 16: PRINT AT B, 0) " < 32*=p 

1 ": NEXT B 

354 FOR A- 15 TO 254 STEP 401 PL 
DT A, HI; DRAM B,25: DRAW 25, Bt 
DRAW fl, -25: DRAW -25,01 NEXT A 

357 LET A*-"(2*spO "i LET B«l ■ B 



TO 222 

400 CLS t IF P1=INT T THEN LET 
K-l: BO TO 402 

401 LET K=2 

4IB PRINT AT 10, B; INK 6["THE W 
INNCRS IS , « 

412 FOR A"21 TO 12 STEP -ll PR1 
NT AT A, 13; N* IK); BEEP .01, A: BE 
EP .01,A+lBl BEEP . Bl,A+20; NEXT 

A 

42B GO TD 203 

500 CLS : GQ TO 10 
9BH0 PAUSE 10: CLS 

9010 PRINT AT 0. 10; - INSTRUCTIONS 
" ;AT 1, IBf (12»=p) " 
9020 PRINT AT 3,0; INK 4; » 1 , VOU 

MUST FIRST CHOOSE TWO NUMBER 
E BY SHOOTING AT THEM"; GO BUB 9 
990t PRINT #B; "(31*Jpl" 

9030 PRINT AT 6,0; INK Sj "2. YOU 
THEN HAVE TD CHQOSE IF YOU WD 
ULD LIKE TO ADD, SUBTRACT DR HU 
LTIPLV THE TWO NUMBERS"! M SUB 
999B: PRINT #0; AT B, IB; "' CI 2#»p I * 
9040 PRINT AT 10,0; INK h\ "3. ¥0 
U MUST THEN ANSWER THE SUM COflft 
ECTLY AND IT WILL BE ADDED TO 
YOUR SCORE": GO SUB 99901 PRINT 
#B;"f32*sp) " 

9050 PRINT AT 14,0| INK 5; "4- TH 
E FIRST PERSON TO REACH THETARG 
ET WINS": BO SUB 99901 PRlNT4tB; 
AT a,B;"<32#»p) ■ 
9055 PRINT AT 17, B; INK 4; "5. 1 



F YOU GO OVER THE TARBET YOU 
MUST TRY TO SET A NEGATIVE NUMB 
ER eg. 1-9 = -B" 
9060 FOR B-B TO 9: FOR A*0 TD i 

PAUSE 5: PRINT AT 21, H; "USE " | 
INK A| "SPACE"; INK 7|" TO FIRE": 

BEEP .001, A*7: NEXT A; WEST B: 
GO TO 9H70 

9B70 CLS t PRINT AT B,7| "WOULD Y 
DU LIKE TO" ;AT 10*3; "SEE THE INS 
TRUCTIONS AGAIN"; AT 12,13j"(Y/N) 



"T* THEN GO TD 9 



9071 IF INKEY*- 
BBB 

9072 IF INKEY*-"N" THEN SO TD 1 
00 

9073 GO TO 9071 
99B0 STOP 

9990 PRINT >B;AT 0,10; "PRESS EPA 

CE" 

9?9i IF lNKEY*-"(ipl " THEN FDR 

A=l TO 101 BEEP .B09.A! NEXT Ai 

RETURN 

9992 GO TO 9991 

9993 CLEAR : PRINT "PREPARE THE 
SPECTRUM TO SAVE ( 34* spj THIS PROS 
RAM" 

9994 SAVE CHR* 1 3+CHR* 13+CHR* 1 
3+CHR* 13+ "TARGET" LINE B: BEEP 
1,-B 

9995 CLS : PRINT "PREPARE THE BP 
ECTRUM TO VERIFY(34**p>THIS PRDG 
RAM"« VERIFY ""; BEEP 1 ,-0i CLS 
t PRINT "VERIFICATION O-K.-'t STD 
P 



u 




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An Industry standard joystick interface using the 5N31 or 
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DKZ9D DKTronics Dual Port Joystick I'lace 1 1 65 
Allows connection at two joysticks, one using IN31 , and 
the other the cursor keys. 

DA230 Oatel Games Ace Joystick I lace 12.95 

An IN31 system with sound amplification through the 
TV speaker. 

PR240 ProtekSwilchaoie Joystick nace 15.45 

Switchabie between IN31, Cursor keys and Sinclair 
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DA25Q Dalel Turbo Ace Joystick I'lace 15,95 

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the TV speaker 

BU280 Bud Programmable I'lace 
Saga 1 'Emperor' Keyboard 
DKTronics Keyboard 
Kempston Centronics 'E 1 Printer 
I'face 
Plug-in-and-go with software held on EPROM 
nects Spectrum to standard Centronics printers. 
DK530 DKTronics Centronics Printer I'lace 29. 95 
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DK630 DKTronics Speech Synthesizer 21.95 

Supplied with driving software and its own speaker. 
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Plug-in-and-go system putting speech through the TV 
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DN810 Alphacom 32 printer 49.95 

DN620 Paper for Alphacom 32 (Box ol 

5 rolls) 9.35 





SA330 
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14.95 
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£225 inc VAT RRP. £333 

UCHIOA DWX-305 PROFESSIONAL 
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20 characters per second. Up to 144 chs per line. 
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• Free delivery 

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• 90 day warranty and full technical support 

• £5 otl listed Spectrum Centronics interlaces if 
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EL93Q SP48 32k RAM upgrade for 16k 

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No-solder kit for upgrading 16k Spectrums from Issue 2 
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storage box 5.95 

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DK940 DKTronics Light Pen 15.95 

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TAPE TO DRIVE TRANSFER 
OF RECENT PROGRAMS 



Yes SPECTRUM OWNERS can even transfer many of the LATEST 

fast/Jericv programs to their drives at LOW COST with our 
software ond Information sheets You will toe amcaed at what 
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Firstly you will need our MD1 b (for nrVdrlve) or WD1 b (tor Word 
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(Wafddrrve version Is called WAFATAPE at £4), 



LERM 
INFORMATION SHEETS 



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UPDATE SERVICE: Send Old tape + large SAE to get a £2 
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CAR CURE 




CAR CURE will translcwm your micro into an 
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S3 



SINCL A I R 1 : 5 1: R A u* uir J9SS 




WE LEFT Samarrak in the 
dawn, heading south and east 
10 reach the Imperial Highway 
and the frontier ofMaru. I confess I was 
in an ill mood, after being fleeced by the 
smug landlord of the Damaged Dragon. 
Eighteen silver pieces he charged, that 
crafty southerner! It would have cost me 
more hut I refused resolutely to pay the 
seven extra coins he demanded because, 
he said, my great weight had broken the 
bed, A quick demonstration of the powers 
of my new magic club convinced him. 

Around noon we joined the great 
Highway, paved with red flagstone and 
shimmering in the sun. Here began the 
Marshes of Vrunnar. Giant reed beds 
stretched as far as the eye could see. The 
Moravians let this place stay wild so that 
raiders must follow the road or risk the 
terrors of the bogs - either way they will 
perish. 

Just before nightfall we came to the 
first outpost of the Empire - a tall, 
wooden tower protected by a palisade 
and deep ditches. The five man garrison 
kept many horses corralled to provide 
fresh mounts for northerly bound couriers. 
Here I met Urdnal of the Nose - 
swollen and crushed it is from many years 
of drink and brawls. We were once 
comrades in the Vth Eshak Scouts and he 
had stayed on as a corporal. We drank 
and reminisced a while and then joined 
the other travellers who skeltered over- 
night at the post. As we sal around the 
fire they confided their problems to me. 

Mindstrainer Matthews of Watford 
told me of his time upon the Emerald 
Isle. He had built a canoe there but 
could not sail the thing- In the past I 
have held converse with Michael, Great 
Lord of the Levels, and he revealed to me 
that the adventurer should drop his canoe 
at the shore, say 7r j or board the vessel - 
then simply travel where he will. 

Another had been trapped m a crumb- 
ling mine on the same island but could 
not prop up the ceiling with a handy post, 
Support is all you need. 



Mindstrainer had discovered a magic 
word - V he said. Alas, I hear that this 
is of no great use except as a red herring. 
It is only the echo of 'xyzzy', a spelt in 
the Colossal Adventure* 

A group had been bewildered in the 
town ofScarthorpe, home of the Urban 
Upstart- Skinhead of M or dor grumbled 
that he could not kill the rats wkich infest 
parts of that dismal town. As far as I 
know, rodent extermination is not neces- 
sary to success. The cheese may help you 
escape imprisonment if eaten. 

Brak Beamish of Horsell gave us all 
some useful tips but, despite his know- 
ledge, could not persuade the airport 
officers to let him through to his craft. 
Two things are necessary - any pilot must 
have the required papers to leave the 
town but also should brighten the officers' 
tedious day with a suitable bribe. 

This was of no use to Lone Wulf of 
Fife who had not even been able to find 
any money, though he had traced the 
machine that dispenses it. People are 
careless, Wulf, and will drop the 
strangest things into dustbins and rubbish 
piles. Read all letters with care and your 
trouble may soon end. 
El-Mokadem of Famham made care- 

Gordo dispenses 

wisdom to 
adventurers in the 
Urunnar Marshes 



ful notes of what was said but asked 
where the flying suit might be. Perhaps it 
was left to dry on some pipes? 

None of us could help Krusher Kreis- 
cher of 41 A Dynevor Road, Skewen, 
Neath SAW 6TF. He was desperate to 
know how to remove a copy of the Quill 
from a safe in his Murder Hunt. If you 
hove the answer then write to him 
without delay! 

Also requiring your assistance is Tho- 
mas de Barri of 271 Larchville, Water- 
ford, Eire. He covets the Jewels of 
Babylon- He has braved manyperib but 
cannot elude the cannibals, the crocodile 
or the octopus. 

As I went to look over the horseflesh at 
the corral I met Pranger Patel of 
BlakmhalL There are still very many of 
you who wish to breach the force field on 
Planet of Death - he advised that all 
should reflect the field twice with the 
mirror and then dance. Others do say that 
the true route is to fire the gun twice 
before cavorting - try them both. This 
should assist Hugo of Oakham whose 



hair is greying with the task, 

Pranger also advised me that anyone\ 
can escape the prison by kicking the bar. 
Keep this piece of iron as it can be used 
later as a fuse. Go up to leave the cell. 
But Pranger could not use the lift to take \ 
his spacecraft to freedom - the High 
Priests of Artie tell me that button four 
on the control pad should do the trick. 
The clue at this place reads 'No Dusty 
Bin Rules'. Surely this means that 3 2 U 
should be avoided? At all costs, say I. 

Lady Susan of Chester overheard us 
and confessed that she had not even 
managed to find the laser gun. If she has 
a floorboard she may cross a ravine 
beyond the lake, There stands a hut and 
there within the gun. 

At another fire Boyd the Bold boasted 
of his total success with Valkyrie 17. He 
has also found that repeatedly opening 
and closing the safe will deliver an 
endless supply of necklaces and lethal 
boxes - but they are of no use! This 
meant little to Chris of Taggart whose 
problem was to find a use for a can of 
spray foam. It is not for whiskers, young 
sir, but can blind any spying eye, even if 
made of glass or metal. 

Now, my friends, I have received a 
hopeful plea from young Persevering 
Paul of 100 Benland, Peterborough 
PE3 SEE. Thus he writes: u Dear Gordo 
Greatbelty, I've been playing Magic 
Mountain and can go no further, I have 
found two mazes and sought the exits m 
vain." Give this bard your valiant 
assistance — his gratitude will be un- 
bounded. 

Ranger Reid collared me to claim his 
title of Lord High System Breaker. He 
joys that he has completed System 
L5000 after many weeks of hacking. 
Should any of you wish to know the 
solution - telephone him. He would not 
reveal the true number except in code. 
Break it and the System* s secrets may be 
yours: (7+c)(8+e)(7+a)(8+e)(7+a) 
(6+i)(0+aX8+eX8+e)(l-b). 

So we alt fell asleep around the dying , 
embers, though there were strange bowl- 
ings from the marsh and the horses behind 
whinnied in fear. Til next moon, my 
fellow travellers, farewell. 



fhcZCjft 




Gordo Greatbtlly, Landlord 

if you Have a sale to wit, or are m need of a helping 
hand, write to (he Landlord of the Dancing Ogre 
cia Sinclair User, Priory Court, 30-32 Famngden 
Lane, London ECIR SMB. 



CLAIR USER August 1985 



89 



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Nice Password. 
Shame about the Identity 



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Take our exciting new "Gallery"- 
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All pan of a tremendous Com- 
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Get computer news first on 
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Micronet is unique amongst 
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The only accessory you need is 
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Fill in the coupon for the lull 
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Richard Price has 
fun in Dun Darach 
and escapes from 
a sunk submarine 

ANYONE who has done some 
bitch -hiking or Long distance 
L travelling will know how it 
feels to arrive somewhere new and 
foreign — tired, broke, edgy and with 
nowhere to stay. It is always unsettling 
and frustrating not to know the local 
customs or how the natives will, react 
to your outlandish behaviour and 
dress. It is ten times worse if you have 
no idea how you can raise some cash to 
survive a little bit longer. 

If you have never experienced this 
first-hand you can still get a strong 
flavour of being on the road from Dun 
Darach — more a prcquel than a 
sequel to Gargoyle's stunning Tir Na 
Nog. 



Dun Darach 



Cuchulainn,, Irish myth-hero, remains 
the central character in the new game. 
This time it is not the sidhe- ridden 
afterworld he strides through but a 
city of living men, more medieval than 
mystic with its winding, maze- 1 ike 
streets and busy, preoccupied citizens. 

After a hard day's fighting against 
his traditional enemies, the men of 
Connacht, Cuchulainn and his char- 
ioteer Loeg stop at a wayside inn for 
the heroic equivalent of a Jong cool 
pint of JC. 

As they wait for their drinks in 
comes a very beautiful woman, asking 
if one of them will help her with the 
broken axle of her carriage. Loeg is 
severely smitten and leaps to her 
assistance. 



When Cuchulainn comes out to 
watch he finds that one of bis chariot- 
horses has been slaughtered and his 
charioteer kidnapped. Further en- 
quiries reveal that Loeg has been 
abducted by Skar, a good-looking but 
entirely evil sorceress whose base is 
the Secret City of Dun Darach, 

Dun Darach uses the same out- 
standing graphic format as its prede- 
cessor and is effectively a controllable 
animated cartoon. Cuchulainn and the 
scene around him can be viewed from 
different angles and he can be moved 



£ >j SINCLAIR USER 





left and right through the streets. He 
can enter houses, examine their in- 
teriors and collect objects. All actions 
are carried out by single key presses, 
with no text input. 

The upper part of the screen shows 
the action with the remainder of the 
screen containing the compass indica- 
tor, list of possessions and the name of 
the quarter of the town you are 
moving through. Make no mistake, 
the city is large and bafflingly complex 
— although the streets are named, a 
map is essential, 

You will find tradesmen of all 
kinds, private houses, temples, banks, 
gambling hells, police-like yeomen, 
pickpockets and honest citizens — 
though there don't seem to be too 
many of those. It is possible to get a 
job or make money by stealing your- 



self — that is difficult as the yoemen 
are vigilant and you will need to find 
an Arthur Daley figure to fence the 
goods before you get caught. 

Gargoyle admits its debt to the 
works of fantasy writers like Fritz 
Lieber and Michael Moorcock. The 
company has created a city which is 
alive and fascinatingly complex and 
you will find it all too easy to neglect 
your true quest in favour of exploring 
and hustling. 

The game is less abstract than Tir 
Na Nog — though there are plenty of 
enigmas to solve — and identification 
with Cuchulainn is easy as you wander 
the sleazy pleasure quarter of Iumain 
or the warrens of the Dispossessed. 

I enjoyed every compulsive minute 
of Dun Darach. It is definitely not a 
rehash of a successful format, though 
it has the same technical excellence 
and careful programming. If anything 
it is a lot more interesting and eventful 
than the earlier game, with equally 
superb graphics. Get it as soon as you 
can and let me know quickly where I 
can sell a fat black pearl or stash some 
stolen gold bars. Absolutely recom- 
mended . 



Caesar's Travels 




Caesar, the cheeky Dotty Minor car- 
toon cat, has appeared once before in a 
mouse-catching arcade game. Now he 
is the star of Caesar's Travels, de- 
scribed by the publishers as an ani- 



Cuchullain on 
the road 









Adventure = 






.11 






mated story program and intended to 
attract the three to nine age group. 

The hand-outs with the program 
make great play of the educational 
benefits of the game and so it seems 
fair to look at it as an aid to learning. 

The game is basically an option 
adventure with the animated figure of 
Caesar walking through various scenes 
looking for a new home — he has been 
kicked out by his disgruntled owner 
Mr McGregor for smashing too much 
crockery in his pursuit of mice. 

Each location is a full screen picture 
with text written above. There are six 
main options but no more than two 
appear on each screen. You may 
decide, for instance, to jump over a 



night. Even if you work out that those 
are the enemy cats you are not allowed 
to count Caesar who is the only really 
visible cat. Here then, you are ex- 
pected to look through Caesar's eyes. 
In contrast, at another decision 
point, you are given the option of 
going left or right. If you try to do this 
from the cat's viewpoint you will be 
told you are wrong. 











wall or hide in a dustbin. 

There are 38 routes through the 
game and l& different endings, all 
happy and non- violent — a point in 
the game's favour. 

The graphics are bright and cheer- 
ful, very similar to the style of the 
earlier arcade game. However, Caesar 
flickers as he moves and the attributes 
tend to clash. Despite that, the cat is 
an appealing figure for children, 

I am not sure that Caesar's Travels 
is successful as an educational tool as 
there are a number of inconsistencies 
which may only serve to confuse 
younger children. 

At one point Caesar is disturbed in 
the night by a posse of alley cats. The 
player is asked to count the cats in the 
picture, hut the other cats are depicted 
only as pairs of eyes glowing in the 















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Xlhl 



wnvi NOW ' Bl i i ii 

NlwVi . 

inn MOW? i READ fit 



Dead at the 
Controls 



Artie's adventures have tended to 
follow a style which is straightforward 
and without frills. A pan from the 
addition of graphics, the last adven- 
ture Eye of Bain was very much in the 
same vein and none the worse for it. 

When I received a pre-production 
version of Dead at the Controls, I 
expected to find a tight but competent 
text game with added graphics. After 
an hour or so of play 1 found myself 
pretty disappointed, 

You are the captain of a spaceship 
which explodes over a strange new 
planet. Heroically leaving the crew to 
their fate you parachute to earth to 
discover some means of escape. 

Wandering through the jungle, you 
find a teleport device in an Aztec city 
— hang on, what's this about Aztecs, 
arent we supposed to be on a strange 
new world? Oh well . . . The telepor- 
ter will take you to several unrelated 
locations where you should be able to 
collect the various bits of a spacesuit. 
That's about it. 

Despite fast, attractive graphics — 
some repeated several times for diffe- 
rent locations — the game lacks 
atmosphere. Anything which is not 
directly relevant to the solution has no 
real existence — examining things like 
rock cairns inevitably results in the 



response, 'You don't see much'. The 
world offers no opportunity for diver- 
sion and ends up as a bleak, unstimu- 
lating environment. The descriptions 
are minimal. 

If the review version of Dead at the 
Controls resembles the final produc- 
tion copies then, sadly v the game is 
nowhere near Artie's usual standard. 



Subsunk 



This month's final offerings are both 
produced by Firebird and written 
with the Quill. The first is Subsunk. 
You are Ed Lines ace reporter for 
the trade rag Seafaring Gazette. Your 

amanvrd en page 94 





Adventure 



continued from pagt 93 

assignment, to seek out the truth of 
life in a nuclear submarine, has run 
into deep trouble, A foreign power has 
attacked the sub, captured the crew 
and scuttled the vessel . 

Your only way to safety will be to 
rig up some son of aerial and send a 
distress message to Headquarters, 

There are fast, bright graphics ibr 
many of the sub's numerous compart- 
ments, the occasional sound effect, 



another dose of rather dreary escap- 
ing, Not so, as the sub is interesting 
enough to take your mind off the lack 
of other creatures. Well designed and 
thoroughly enjoyable escapism. 



The Helm 




e»n h « » i 

ri r, t j i » * u y 
tie* w im or 
the isnir 

ICVlLl. 



&QURP D±SpL.flV 

l nil t tjaur comfin. 
mrt.au piSISLftv 
I can ' K i 

Tt I I % fl » s * i t e 44* 

■ '. ■xnlMF OISfLflV 

Toil 'ft on Ihl ili-bid kttiVl 



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«A1 t "j^KJf £OBIiiri4> 



and a friendly interpreter which gives 
information about even useless items* 
Add a few wry jokes and you have an 
enjoyable adventure. 

You have to devise a way not only to 
sort out the radio link but also to send 
up the aerial on a float- One slip and 
you will depressurise. 

1 was initially put off on reading the 
cassette notes and thought I was in for 



The Helm confers immortality on its 
wearers. The current owner is the 
local, evil Lich but he does not have 
all the pieces of the sacred headgear. 
Without all the bits he cannot become 
an eternal Lich so it is up to you to 
find Lhe remaining disguised portions 
and enter the wicked one's castle. 
There you can steal the final piece. 
The Lich will not take kindly to this. 

The game is text only and composed 
in medieval script which is occasional- 
ly difficult to read. The interpreter's 
responses are servile and sometimes 
long-winded — instead of "What 
next?' you get 'What would you have 
me do next, Your Brillianceness?'. 

The text scrolls up the screen in 
different colours and has a startling 
kaleidoscopic effect. Despite that the 
descriptions and general information 
are quite full and there is a fine 
tongue-in-cheek approach to the busi- 



ness of magical adventure, 

There is a wide range of deduction 
problems ranging from the traditional 
crossing of the ravine to defeating a 
mesmerising Psyak — which man- 
ifests itself as a ball of light. 

As far as I am concerned , Firebird 
can carry on bringing out programs 
like these. They both show that text 
adventures can be fun without having 
to be self-important in attitude. 



Dun Da recti 

Publisher Gargoyle Games 

Memory 4EK Price £9.95 

***** 

Caesar's Travels 
Publisher Mirror soft 
Memory 43 K Price £7,95 

# + 

Dead at the Controls 
Publisher Artie 
Memory 43K Price £6-95 

* + 

Subsunk 

Publisher Firebird 
Memory 43K Price £2 50 

The Helm 
Publisher Firebird 
Memory 48K Price £2,50 
**** 



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94 



SINCLAIR USHR Augmt IW$ 







IN 



(kv^ 







Spellbound — Beyond 

Starbike — The Edge 

Kokotoni Will — Elite 

The Pyramid — Fantasy 

Horace Goes Ski-ing — Melbourne House/Psion 

Gilligan's Gold — Ocean 

Ant Attack — Quicksilva 

3D Tank Duel — Real-Time 

Jack and the Beanstalk — Thor 

Sorcery — Virgin 

and 

Feed the World 

the hit single 

from Band Aid 



Available from all good software stores now. Price £4,99. 

All proceeds to 
Bob Geldof Band-Aid Ethiopian Appeal Fund 



SINCLAIR L'SER Auguti WS5 



95 



Can the ghost 
of Christmas 
Past be laid 
to rest? Bill 
Scolding meets 
the exorcists 

LEAD-BLACK clouds are 
massing in the east as we 
J draw up outside the inno- 
cent looking offices of a suburban 
building society. I feel the hairs 
rise on the nape of my neck. 

Through a shabby unmarked 
door, down an unlit alleyway and 
up the creaky staircase. All too 
quickly we are ushered into the 
presence of the Feels, the obsessive 
genius and his insanely loyal wife, 
who together created ihe infamous 
House of Legend and unleashed its 
power upon an unsuspecting world. 

John Peel — techno- freak and 
dedicated eccentric — rises to greet 
us. His eyes lurk behind glasses 
thick as the bottoms of milk bottles, 
his chin boasts a fluff of a beard, his 
head a receding wisp of hair. He talks 
and smokes incessantly. 

Jan Peel, long dark hair and a wide 
grin, keeps John in check, curbing the 
excesses of his indiscriminating gos- 
sip. As managing director she is very- 
much in control, coping with adminis- 
tration, sales and generally maintain- 
ing contact with the real world; while 
John, head of software, indulges in the 
flights of fantasy which eventually see 
the light of day as Legend games, 

Pleasantries over, Peel is im- 
mediately on the attack. "1 have to tell 
you that I was Very Angry when 1 saw 
your little piece in the May issue." 

Oh God, Gremlin's got n wrong 
again. Nothing else for it but to brave 
the storm . . . "All that rubbish about 
hiring a country mansion for the 
programmers," Peel continues. 
"Totally untrue." He waves his arms 
about, taking in the small office, the 
cartons stacked against the wall, the 
overflowing desks and ashtrays. 

''We didn't set out to con or hype 
anyone with TGSR." TGSR — The 
Great Space Race, a game you didn't 
so much play as sit back while it 
played with itself. Launched just be- 
fore Christmas, it got a thumbs down 
from the press, bombed in the shops 
and left distributors howling. 

"The programming team ran for 
cover. We brought in a new team 




which spent three weeks of sleepless 
nights trying to get the shambles 
working for the deadline," Peel ex- 
plains, "But we let our main distribu- 
tors see it. giving ihem the chance to 
cancel or reduce their orders. They 
were greedy and thought the game 
would sell anyway. 

"How we're offering Komplex at 
reduced price to all those kids who 
bought TGSR and weren't happy with 
it. And we've done deals to bail out 
distributors of all unsold copies. We 
didn't have to, but we wanted to 
regain credibility. We lost over 
£200,000 on the game." On the office 
wall a TGSR poster Looks down, the 
curse which might have brought about 
the fall of the House of Legend . 

Peel lurches to his feet. "Come on, 
let's see what Software is doing." Up 
another flight of stairs to ihe garret of 
Dave Ashe, artist, punk. All in black, 
with studded black belt, black and 



Jan and John Ptrf. nakty busmi 



yellow hair, Ashe looks like a healthy 
Ian Dury. He designs all the on-screen 
graphics, the advertisements, posters 
and logos, although Jan Peel retains 
close creative control. Complicated 
geometric shapes spiral across his 
sketch pads and mouse-driven design 
screens, the rough layouts for the 
Komplex trilogy. 

Ashe creates the images on a custo- 
mised BBC and they arc then transfer- 
red, via heavily expanded BBCs used 
by the programmers next door, to the 
Specirums and Commodores, Peel en- 
thuses about the detail of the graphics. 
"A full set of frames, for one rotating 
object moving towards you, can take 
24 frames or more depending on 
flicker and over three days to draw ."' 

At present the team is working on 
Komplex City, part two of the trilogy, 
due to be on sale at the end of June. 
"Each game is complemeniary to the 
others, though different," says Peel. 



96 



SINCLAIR USbR Augmi 198$ 



a 




Legend of the 
haunted house 



"In a sense Komplex City should have 
been launched first It's the fastest of 
the games and involves Less map- 
making ." 

Nevertheless,, the program has the 
potential for a mind- boggling quantity 
of maps, running into trillions. Peel 
explains, "Each map has a 12- 
character name,, and as there are 37 
possible characters — including the 
alphabet and numerals — then , there 
are 6,500,000,000,000,000,000 maps 
which can be generated." Hmm, 

Wc move into the programming 
den, known as the PPC — the Per- 
verts and Pillocks Club — where Colin 
Foster and Dave Ebsworth sweat out 
their days over the keyboards. 

Ebsworth is fresh -faced and straight 
from school: Colin, older but just as 
clean, with an MSc in concurrent 
operating systems. Like Ashe, both 
sport Komplex T-shirts. For our be- 
nefit, or is it a house rule? 

Part of Komplex City is up on the 
monitor; waves of 'flyngs' — PPC 



criticism that it was too difficult in the 
earlier game. Other improvements in- 
clude a real-time clock. A scrolling 
database keeps track of where your 
targets are in the labyrinth. 

The shelves around the room are 
crowded widi boxes of discs and ring 
binders, fat with code listings — the 
debris of The Great Spate Race. 
"Over £1000 of discs were used," 
moans Peel. "Most of it had to be 
junked." 

Was the game too ambitious? Colin 
Foster pauses, creating the impression 
that he is considering this for the first 
time. "From what I've seen the prog- 
rammers weren't op to it." Peel has no 
such reservations. Brandishing a car- 
ton he exclaims, "That's how profes- 
sional I hey were. They were using 
micTodrives!" 

Will the ghost of TGSR ever be laid 
to rest? Peel puts on a brave face. "As 
a result of TGSR we came up with the 
philosophy of visible development. 




verbal shorthand for flying things — 
hurtle down wireframe tunnels, Every 
now and then a docking screen 
appears, 'an assortment of interesting 
gratuitous garbage*, as Peel puts it, 
although it is not gratuitous at all. It 
can replenish your energy levels and 
hyperspace drive, or deplete them 
further if used incorrectly. 

Docking in Komplex City is easier 
than in Komplex, apparently due to 



Every day, if not every hour, progress 
can be seen." In other words, you 
don't leave it until the last minute to 
discover you've hatched a turkey. 

The Legend offices are crammed 
full of hardware. Not just keyboards, 
drives and screens, but extraneous 
equipment too — miniature TVs, 
complicated cameras. Spectrums are 
in abundance — "They tend to break 
down a lot," mutters Peel — but not 
an Amstrad or MSX to be seen. 



"We're not bothering with them," 
says Peek "It is mostly second league 
software houses which are jumping for 
the Amstrad because they can't com- 
pete with the first leaguers on the 
Commodore and Spectrum. We've 
had Amstrad around here pestering us 
to do things. We'd license products to 
them for conversion but for us it's not 
economic." 

And the QL? "I wouldn't touch it, 
mainly because I don't know anybody 
who's got one," Peel says and then 
adds, "Oh, except one of the TGSR 
programmers — which says a lot." 

We leave the black-garbed PPC and 
go for lunch. The sky too is black now 
and the air is heavy. 

Several glasses of wine later wc are 
treated to a potted history of the Peels. 
In the years BC — Before Computers 
— John Peel hacked it as a freelance 
hi-fi journalist. "Faced with my 92nd 
article on how to choose a record deck 
I realised I was burnt out f " says Peel, 

Was he ever confused with the well 
known disc jockey? "Oh yes, got lots 
of fan mail — and some very interest- 
ing phone calls. One magazine had the 
bright idea of a 'John Peel meets John 
Peel' article. I met the guy, didn't get 
on with him, so we got drunk instead. 
By the time the photographer arrived 
we were plastered. Worst photographs 
ever taken." 

Peel's first computer was a CBM 
100 followed by a UK 101 When 
Casio launched its handheld micro 



(tmtmued tm /Wj 



SINCLAIR USER Angmi 198S 




Hit Squad 



f onlirtm d from page 9? 

Peel produced the English manual. 

Peel formed MiCROL in Septem- 
ber 1981; it was a bread and butter 
operation j selling spreadsheets and 
databases for portable computers, 
"We knew the Spectrum was coming, 
and the first MiCROL Spectrum ads 
appeared the week of the press launch- 
We didn't realise games were going to 
he big but around Christmas '82, 
when Quicksilva was advertising its 
games, we knew it was the time for 
games. We decided to go for an 
adventure as the only professional 
adventure at that time was The 
Hobbit. 

'Valhalla was masterminded from a 
one-bedroom flat in Purley," Peel 
continues. "Ii took three man years to 
write, starting in March '83 } and was 
ready in October, We didn't try to 
contact any distributors; they had to 
work hard to find us," 

Jan Peel designed the adverts, wrote 
die manual and did the imaging for 
the characters in Valhalla. An ex- 
nurse, working in a boys' school, she 
met John Peel through an ad placed by 
her friends in the lonely hearts' pages 
of Time Out, They arranged to meet; 
Jan would be driving her red Mini, 



John would be waiting on the comer, 
"I got in, talked to the lady. We got on 
fine," Peel laughs, "Trouble was, it 
was the wrong red Mini . . . Jan had 
got lost." 

And now they drive a Porsche. 

What do they feel of recent ani- 
mated adventures, other computer 
movies? "We coined the phrase 'com- 
puter movie'," says Peel. "Imitation is 
the sincerest form of flattery. There 
are some products which command 
real respect, like Tir Na Nog. I 
greatly respect Ultimate's work, I 
thought I was going to like Skool 
Daze, but it was too complicated." 

Jan Peel agrees. 1L lt had great detail, 
I took at the characters, how they 
move. But*" she confesses, "I hate 
most games. So many are too difficult 
to get into. Strange loop is a good 
example of that type of game.*' 

"Perhaps Komplex is too," adds 
Peek "It's difficult striking a balance 
between the karning curve and game 
richness." 

What about Valhalla 2? When will 
that be released? Peel is cagey. "The 
true follow-up will come later in the 
year — another computer movie." 
Will it include icons? Peel dictates 
slowly, "You can say, 'From what 



Peel said I suspect that it is likely that 
Valhatti 2 will consist of mixed icons 
and toft.' " Thank you, John, 

Thar* is a sudden crack of thunder 
and a flash of lightning is reflected in 
Peel's glasses. "Right at this minute," 
he intones, "I can tell you what my 
team is doing. They're furiously mak- 
ing back-up copies to avoid mains 
glitches getting through our power 
smoothers." 

Now there is a wall of rain outside. 
The conversation grows darker, and 
Peel holds forth on the evils of desig- 
ner drugs and Santa Claus politics. 
Drugs form the background to The 
Novel he is writing, an apocalyptic 
vision of the future about which, aiier 
heavy hints from Jan Peel, he is 
unnaturally reticent. The ram pours 
down. 

We leave the Peek and their 
haunted house in a hot black summer 
storm. The PPC are still beavering 
away over their machines, Dave the 
punk is drawing cabbalistic signs wiih 
his mouse, John Peel is wandering 
about in a wreath of cigarette smoke, 
the invisible albatross of The Great 
Space Rate about his neck, and Jan 
Peel is smiling, in control. The 
Legend goes on . 



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SINCLAIR USER August !9&S 



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Yes its true mis fantastic new peripheral will transfer 
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SUB 



SINCLAIR USER AuguU 193S 



99 




Explore the world ofSinc!a» v 



Sinclair User, the monthly magazine, will 
ensure that all ZX81, Spectrum and QL users 
get the most from their computers. 
Every month we include exciting games 
programs, reviews on the latest software, 
bench tests on hardware and peripherals, as 
well as technical advice and development 
news on Sinclair products. 
Sinclair User interviews key people within 
Sinclair Research, authors of top selling 
games plus regular features on the 
•^developments in the fast moving computer 
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100 



SINCLAIR USER Augua 1985 




BE YOUR OWN computer artist with a terrific 
package from Saga Systems of graphics tablet, 
interface and graphics software. The GP graphics 
tablet plugs into the Style interface and allows you to 
draw pictures on the tablet with the included light pen. 
Style incorporates both interface and software. The 
interface contains an analogue to digital convener which 
allows signals such as those generated by GP to be 
converted. It doubles as a Kempston compatible joystick 
interface, which means that you can use a joystick to 
drive the software if you don't have the graphics tablet. 
The software has all the standard features, such as fill 
and circle commands, freehand or straight-line drawing, 
as well as rubber- band boxes and triangles, 

Saga Systems is giving away four prizes of the graphics 
tablet plus Style, and 10 runners-up prizes of Style on its 
own. With GP selling at £79.95 and Style at £29.95, that 
makes a grand total of over £730 worth of prizes for the 
lucky winners. Moreover, everyone who enters will 
receive a £2.00 voucher redeemable on Style and a £5.00 
voucher for GP, if bought direct from Saga Systems 



THE PUZZLE 

ALIENS are broadcasting a message to Earth, 
The message consists of 341 pulses, some short, 
some long, Converting the pulses to noughts 
and ones, you get a string of binary digits, 
printed below. They could be computer 
graphics, so you draw a grid and decide to fill it 
in — a space for zero and a black square for one. 

Calculate what sized rectangular grid you need 
to hold exactly 341 cells, and then fill it in. A 
message will appear, and a clue to the alien 
home planet Write the name of the planet and 
the message, together with your name, address 
and telephone number, on a postcard and send 
it to Sinclair User, Priory Court, 30 32 Farringdon 
Lane, London EC1R 3AU by Friday, August W. 

The first four correct entries pulled from the 
mailbag after that date will win the Saga GP 
graphics tablet and Style, The next 10 will 
receive copies of Style only. Employees of EM AP 
or Saga are not eligible. Only one entry per 
person is allowed. 



f sssssssmgssssss sssassaass 




SPEAK TO THE MICRO MEN FOR 
YOUR SPECTRUM REPAIRS 

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TBI. «7*JM*«"* 



TRANS 



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102 



SINCLAIR USER /lufffH /?« 



Helpline 



Defeating the 
ZX attributes 

Andrew Hewson explains why colour clash 
occurs in the Spectrum screen display 



IT IS NOW rather more man three 
years since Sinclair User was laun- 
ched. I have been writing Helpline 
since then and it has been interesting 
to observe the development in the type 
of problems that you have asked 
about. 

The majority of questions now con- 
cern the ZX Spectrum, and more 
sophisticated than before. I have tried 
to reflect that. I have, for example, 
written several times in recent months 
about controlling the interrupt sys- 
tem, a topic which I would not have 
considered in the early days. 

However, even,' now and again I get 
a flurry of letters concerning fairly 
straightforward topics and so this 
month I answer a few of those. Inter- 
rupt fanatics also get a bit more 
information at the end of the article. 
Vipin Abrol writes from Kapurthala 
in the Indian sub-continent: I bought 
a Spectrum recently and the person 
who sold it said it was a 64K 
machine, but I did not know that a 
64K version was manufactured, How 
can I find out how much memory 
there is? 

The Spectrum has been manufac- 
tured only in 16K and 48 K versions 
and the Spectrum Plus only in a 48K, 
I suspect that the machine in question 
is really a 48K version because it 
would then contain 48K of RAM 
which, when added to the 1©K of 
ROM present in all Spectrum*, would 
yield the 64K value claimed by the 
salesman. 

The way to settle that is to look at 
the value of the P— RAMT system 
variable which is held at address 23732 
and 23733. A 48 K machine, when first 
switched on, will have the contents of 
both addresses set to 255 so that 
entering 

PRINT PEEK 23752, PEEK 23733 
will result in the following being 
PRINTed: 

255 255 

The first value will be the same for a 
16K machine but the second will he 
127. 

If you want the Spectrum to do all 
the work then enter the following: 



PRINT "This is a"; (PEEK 23733 
+ l)/4 - 16; "K Spectrum." 

The second letter comes from Tony 
Braverman of Cambridge. I cannot 
understand the Spectrum attributes 
problems which occur when I use 
The Illustrator program. Instead of 
clearly defined areas of colour I get 
character squares of colour intruding 
into previously filled areas. 

There is nothing you can do about 
that kind of 'error' because it is an 
inherent feature of the Spectrum de- 
sign. To understand the reason why 
the machine was designed in this way 
it is necessary to think about the 
problems associated with producing a 
screen display. 

The basic requirement of any com- 
puter screen display is that it should 
be capable of showing letters and 
digits in a single colour on a uniform 
background of a second colour. The 
ZX-81 fulfils that function by display- 
ing black characters on a white back- 
ground. Up to 32 characters on each of 
24 lines are permitted and as each 

"How do you POKE 

into the ROM so 

that you can do 

fancy letters?" 




character requires one byte of memory 
storage that means that at most 768 
bytes of memory are required to store 
the information displayed. The ZX-8 1 
also uses one byte per line to mark the 
end of each display line so that the 
so-called display file occupies a total of 
792 bytes of memory. 

A monochrome, character-only, 
display is very Limiting and so when 
Sinclair produced the Spectrum the 
company decided to introduce a high - 
resolution screen. In the arrangment 
selected each screen character is made 
up of an 8x8 grid of pixels and the 
status of each pixel — being either on 
or off (that is either displayed or 
invisible) — is determined by the 
status of a corresponding bit in a byte 
m the display file. As there are eight 



# Pleas* address probiani *W qutriti to AitdmD 
Hewson, Helpline, Graham Close. BltU-'sbury, 
Oxfordshire* 

bits in a byte each character requires 
eight bytes of corresponding memory. 
The Spectrum, like the ZX-81, can 
display 24 lines of 32 characters and so 
the Spectrum display Tile contains 8 + 
24 * 32 = 6144 bytes. It is nearly 
eight times bigger than the ZX-81 
equivalent- Note that the 6144 bytes 
contain only enough information to 
produce a two-colour high resolution 
display. A pixel which is illuminated 
appears in the background colour — 
usually white — and a pixel which is 
not illuminated appears in the fore- 
ground colour usually black, 

The obvious way for the manufac- 
turers to create a colour display is to 
allow each pixel to appear in one of 
several colours but a quick calculation 
shows that this demands a great deal 
of memory. Suppose that a four- 
colour display was to be provided, 
Each pixel would then require two bits 
to store its status because two bits can 
together be set in any one of four 
states — both on, on and off, off and 
on, both off. Thus a four-colour dis- 
play requires twice as much memory 
as a two-colour display. 

An eight colour display requires 
three bits per pixel. If Sinclair had 
attempted to do that a total of 3 * 
6144 = 18432 bytes would have to be 
devoted to the Spectrum display, 
more than the entire RAM space in 
the original 16K machine. 

continued on fmgt 104 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 



103 



Helpline 



conimutd from page 103 

To avoid that large memory re- 
quirement the manufacturers opted to 
use a low resolution colour system 
based on character squares. Under the 
system the colour of each character 
square in the display is controlled by a 
corresponding byte in the so-called 
attributes file. 

Each square can be set to any one of 
eight foreground colours — the INK 
— as determined by three of the bits 
in the corresponding byte, and any 
one of eight background colours — 
the PAPER — as determined by a 
further three bits in the corresponding 
byte. The two remaining bits in the 
byte determine the FLASH and 
BRIGHT status of the square. That 
ingenious system allows an eight col- 
our display to be generated using a 
further 768 bytes only — one byte for 
each of 32 characters on 24 lines. 

The disadvantage of this economical 
use of memory is, as Tony has found 
out, that it can be difficult to lay out a 
colour picture on the Spectrum 
screen, The scale of the problem 
depends on the type of picture which 
you wish to create. Cartoon images, 
for example, can usually be adapted to 
match the low resolution colour 
boundaries. With a more sophisticated 
picture it may be worth sacrificing 
colour altogether so as to produce the 
right effect- 

The output of successful Spectrum 
games companies is worth studying 
because they make their living from 
producing images which are pleasing 
to the eye. 

Pyjamarama from Mikro-Gen is a 
good example of cartoon work de- 
signed with the Spectrum low resolu- 
tion colour screen in mind. The player 
is more or less unaware of a colour 
problem except when the moving fi- 
gure passes across an object in the 
background. Ultimate* on the other 
hand, has opted in recent months for a 
system where the game is played in 
monochrome only with a small 
amount of peripheral colour decora- 
tion. 

The Spectrum compromise is not 
unreasonable for an inexpensive home 
computer because it enables an eight - 
colour display at a good resolution to 
be generated from only 6K of mem- 
ory. That compares well with the 16K 
required by the Amstrad for a four- 
colour display of rather better resolu- 
tion and up to 20K required by the 
much more expensive BBC. The only 
machine which can fairly claim to do 



distinctly better in performance in this 
area, for a comparable price, is the 
Commodore 64. 

The low memory requirement of 
the Spectrum has another particular 
advantage which I doubt if the manu- 
facturers considered when they were 
designing the machine, but is of par- 
ticular importance for a games 
machine. It is that the display file, 
being small, can be up-dated quickly 
so that, all other things being equal,, 
there is more scope for hectic screen 
activity. It is a point which proponeots 
of large sophisticated display systems 
often overlook. 



tored by entering 

POKE 23607 »A 
Doing so can be quite tricky ! 

Hence the most practical way to 
create your own character set is to 
copy the original into RAM and then 
modify the copy by one character at a 
time. The Basic program in figure one 
shows how the copying can be done. 

One final point is that the CHARS 
system variable does not point directly 
to the base of the character set itself 
but to an address 256 bytes earlier. 
Therefore the address of the base of 
the character set is given by the 
formula: 



10 INPUT " ENTER BASE ADDRESS FDR NEW CHARACTER TABLE 

20 LET V - 236 • PEEK 23606 + 236 * PEE* 25407 

30 FDR I - TO 767 

4r> PQKE It + I , PEEK ( ¥ + I ) 

SO NEXT I 



I M 



60 



70 



LET * 



236 



POKE 23607 , INT j W 236 ? 



80 PQKE 23606 , X - 236 * INT < X / 236 i 
Figure 1. A Spectrum program to copy the character table to a new location determined 
by the user- 



The next question also concerns the 
Spectrum display. Andrew Surnpter 
of Worksop asks: How do you POKE 
graphics into the ROM so that you 
can do fancy letters automatically? 
It is not possible to POKE a number 
into the Read Only Memory — ROM 
- — or, to be more precise, you can try 
but it will make no difference because 
the number will not be retained. Thus 
it is not possible to change the charac- 
ter set stored in the Spectrum ROM, 

Fortunately, the Spectrum does not 
access its character set directly. In- 
stead there is a system variable called 
CHARS stored at address 23606 and 
23607 which points to the address of 
the beginning of the character set. 
Thus the way to create fancy letters is 
to create a new character set in RAM 
and then alter the CHARS system 
variable to point to the new set. 

There is one pitfall to avoid. It is no 
good changing the system variahle 
before the new character set is created 
and is in place because all the charac- 
ters written to the screen will be 
unintelligible and you will lose control 
of the machine. To see the problem in 
action try the following; 

LET A = PEEK 23607 

POKE 23607,0 
All items PRINTed subsequently will 
appear as a mass of smudges making 
the screeo look like old blotting paper. 
In principle the Situation can be res- 



PRINT 256 + PEEK 23606 + 256 
* PEEK 23607 

The arrangement is not as strange as it 
sounds because the first 32 characters 
in the set are not PRIN Table and 
therefore there is no entry in the table 
for them. Each character requires 
eight bytes for its definition and so the 
first 8 * 32 = 256 bytes are "missing' 
from the table. 

Finally, as promised, a quick 
answer for those readers interested in 
the interrupt system. It is prompted 
by a letter from Patrick Norris of 
Worthing- He points out that: Use of 
interrupt mode two with extra hard- 
ware connected will cause a program 
to crash. Why? 

Patrick's problem is based on a 
slight misunderstanding. Interrupt 
mode two is specifically designed to 
allow external hardware to direct the 
execution of the Z80 microprocessor. 
It does so by providing halt the data 
for the address of the interrupt ser- 
vice. Up to 128 interrupt routines can 
be accommodated, each one tailored by 
the programmer to the needs of the 
interrupting hardware. 

The Kemps ton joystick puts out 
different values depending on the 
setting of the joystick. It is necessary 
for the programmer to ensure that he 
places interrupt vectors at the 
appropriate places in RAM to cope 
with the situation. 



104 



SINCLAIR USER Axgutlim 



See Micronet suu in action: 

See Micronet at John Lewis, main Boots, Laskys or your local computer store 



AVON 
Rath. Bouts. I Mai-chanls, Passage, 

Souir^ale. TeL 0225 64402. 

BrisioL Avon Compuler Rentals 

lb West Street, Old Market 

Ttt 0272 55O6O0. 

Bristol Boots, 59 Bmadmtad 

Tel 0272 293631. 

BrUinL iHaskys, 16-20 l^enn SlrerL 

Tel 0272 20*11 

C Uevedon. f lomnultr Centre, 

1 2 A Old SlrKl, Clevedutt. 

TeL 0272 M795U, 

HHilORDSHLIlE 
Bedford. Boots, 1 "he I larjHir Centre, 
Harpur Sueet/1 et 0334 56211. 
Luton Diiuine, Delapurt House, 
; " ( , uddford Street Tel 058245 56611. 

HIKKSH1RK 
Slough. MV Games, 245 High 

Street 1*1 7 ? 2159*. 

lit < Xi.SH.HAVlMllRr. 
Bletchley. RAMS Computer 
I eatrc, 117 Queensway. 
[ Tet OX* 647744 
Chcsham. Reed Photo Si 
Compuiers. 1 Li High Street 
Ttt 0494 TK3J73 

CAMBRIDGESHIRE 
Cambridge- Hoois, 65-67 Sidney 
Street andlii l > eltv Curry Street 
let 0223 350213 

Cambridge- Cambridge Computei 
Store, 4 LmCfianucl Street 
TeL 0223 358264 

Peterborough-! -og*c Sales, Unit 6 
Mjdgate Parade, Peierborough, 
■[elWM 49696. 
Peterborough. Boots 
40-42 Hndgr. Street, Queensgale, 
TeL 0733 653S2. 



( III SIISHt. 

Chester. Bums, +7-55 FurtgjttC 
Sireet Tel 0244 2842! 
Chester. Computer l-ink,2l Si. 
Wcrburgh Street let 0244 31*5 lb, 
Crcwc MidshirtJ Computer 
Centre, 68-7S Narilwich Road 
Tel 0270 21 ion* 
Hyde C "lech Computer*, 184 
.Market Street let (361-36* 8223. 
Macclesfield, Camera Computer 
Centre, US Mill Sired. 
Tet 0*25 27468 

Macclesfield. Cumpuier Centre, 
68 Chestergalt Tet 0625 61B827. 
VVarole, Mamie Cumpuier Centre, 
106 Oiurthlane. TeL 06J-t4~ w» 
Wilmslow, H ilmvlow Micro 
Centre. b2 Grove Street 

TcJ 0625 530890, 

< lliVl.LAND 
Darllnfrton. Darling* >n Computer 
Shop, TSTlofuisiiLe. TS 0325 4*478. 
Middlesbrough. Boots, 
88-90 Untlwrpe (toad, 
llie Cleveland Centre. 

TcL 0642 249616. 

CLMURIA 
Kendal The Kendal Computer 
( enit-e, Siramongate 
Tet WW 22559. 
Penrith. Fcnnth Communications, 

14 Cattlcgalc. Tet 0768 67144 
Whitehaven. P D Hendrcn, 

1 5 King Street 1 eL 094b 2€&1 
Workington, I echr»c4ogy Store, 

] 7 Kink* f Street, let Op 6*972. . 
DERBYSHIRE 

Airman, Cordon Harwoad, 

47-71 Hish Street TeL OBJ 832B7S, 

Chesterfield- Roots. 35-37 Inw 

Pavement, Market Place. 

TeL 0246 203591 

Chesterfield. Computer Stores* 

|+ Stephenson Place 

let QMS 2DB8U2. 

Derby, Boots, 1 Devonshire 

WafcTct 0311 45816. 



ESSEX 
Basildon. Basildon Software 
Centre, ?M0 I Jbenv Shopp 10 * 
1 1 all East Square 1 eL 02 » 27922. 
Braullree- Mirage MJcpxnmpuiers 
Lid 24 Bull Street, Tel BJW 48121 
Chelmsford Maxim iEavman, 
S Hnomfieid Read. Tet 0245 354595. 
Chelmsford. Way In Computer*, 
7 Village Square, Yd 0245 +678.58. 
Colchester. Bodes, 5-6 IJon Walk. 
TeL 0206 577303. 

Colchester. Colchester Computer 
Centre, 3a Short WW Street 
let 0206 47242. 

Geays. II. Reynolds, 28 a Southend 
Roil Tet 0375 31641. 
Harlow. Harlow Computer Centre, 
17 Staple Tve. TeL 027*? 22S46. 
Elorneburcb. Compiel Computer 
SvstemS, I ] 2a North Street, 
TeL 0402 446741. 

llforiL Boots, 1 77-1 H 5 High Road. 
Tel ul 553 211b 
Homfwd. Software Plus, 
72 Korth Strm. Tet 70 65271. 
Southend-on-S«a- fiomralellO* 
M l-ondun Road, Tet 0702 335443. 
Snullicad-on-Stt- Cumpuier 
Centre, 336 I-tfndon Road 
Tet 07(12 3171*1. 
Suuthend-on-Sra- K>.iLia.r\' 
Personal Computers, 3i* ("hartwell 
North, Victoria Circus Shopping 

Ccfiire, lei 0702 6141 31 

liLUVGESIEK 

Cheltenham, l-askys, 206 High 

Street TeL 0242 57U2S2 

Cheltenham. Screen, Scent, 

144 St O eurutt Road. 

Tet 0242 S21H79. 

Gloucester. Soots, 3H-4* l'.asl);a(e 

Slreel. Tel: 0152 423501, 

HAMPMIIK.I-. 
Hasinesloke, htstier^ 2-3 Marltet 
I'LaceTTt-t 0256 2307* 
PctersfleLd. l ; <Ay Mi£j™, 
45 Chapel StrttLlel (173066841. 
Portsmouth. Micro Choice, 
159 Havani Kuad, Drayton, 
TtL Q7fli 32759 1. 

Portsmouth- RDS liletlrtCat, 157 
161 Kirucloii Road, 1 l*LITWSI247». 
Southamplun- Btfiiness 
Electronio, Mjtrurtwgjc A1 Atkins, 
7 Civic Centre Ro»d, TeL (J701 25903 
Waierlonville. CM Mtsroland. 
7 Queais Parade, London Road 

TeL (170^ l^n L. 

HH»TFORI> 
PoTlers Bar. thE Computer Shop 
107 HighStreeL Tet 0707 444L ■. 
Stev«n.age. DjCooputen, 
1 1 To*r?Scjuare. Tet W38 65501. 
Walford. SRS Mjcrosssi ems^ 
^4 The Parade, E-ta^h Sweet 
Tet 0°23 2mil 
Welvyn tiardeii Cily. D) 
CompulrtSj 40 l-relheme Road 

Tttfr07 32M4 ^_^ 

Ml MM I kMI'i 
Bevefky. Commiling World, 
10 .Swabys ^'artV Dyer I JMtc 
ret 04K2 88.1831. 



Preston, *Mat Ompulnnt 

67 tnarjpite. id 077? 561952. 

Preston. l^isktS 1-4 ( iuildhall 

Arcade TeL 0772 59264 

Wi«n. Wilddnic* Computer Centre, 

|] MeinesSlrcej Tel TrM2 223«2. 

LElCESTEHSIIIHh 
l^iceslcr. Boots, 30-5* Gallowtret 
(.ate. TeL 0533 21641. 
Market tlBrbtrroujdt- Harborough 
IJiiim- ( "omputers, ' Church Street 
Ttt 0«5S 631156- 



LO 



nevow 



Hielcr, Boots, 25 1 High Street, 

I eL 0392 32244. 
titter, Open Channel, 
Central Suiitwv Queen Slrtet. 
Il'LH.W21B1B7. 

Puicnioa, Computer Swam Lto, 
3S rfvde Road TeL OHO? 524284. 
Plymouth. SyiniaiL, 76 Cornwall 
Slrtet, let 0752 2*705. 
ScalOD. Curtis Computer Scrvi«4, 
Sealon Computer Shop, 
<lc Hartour Rood T*V0297 22347 
Tiverton, Artron Mictocomputers, 
37 bj^onSireejJc^0B84 252854. 

DORSET 
EVntraecaouLh. Lansdkm,Tie 
Computer CenTft, I Inansdown* 
CfCKSIt, L atlM kMW M 
Ttt 0202 2901*5. 
t>orchc«tef . The Paper Shop, 
Kings Koad T«* 0305 54564. 
Poole- I JEisiiowne Computer 
Centre, 14 Amdale Centre. 
Tet 0202 670901. 



Astafuru, LXiH, lu-Nonh Sweet 
TeL 0233 32597, ^ 

iVhhford G«nnc? ol Ashlord, 
80 HieJi Sweet "let 0233 33166, 
Bromley, Boots, 148-154 High 
Street TeL 01-460 66SS 
Bromley, Computers 1 odav. 
31 .vVarfcet Square. 
Chatham. Boots, 30-34 * ilmotl 
Sjuare, Pentagon Centre. 
TeL 0*14 405471. 
Gi-avcacnd. Gravesend Home 
Computers, 39 The Terrace. 
let 0471 2387 1. 
GiLllnfhajD. Regal Sotiware 
Supplies, 4V Hifih Suwt, 
Tel0bJ4 57963T 
MAidslone- Hoots, 56-62 King, 
Street. Tet 0622 53912. 
Maidstone. Kent ,Vltcros,51 L.niOfl 
StreeL Tet 0622 52784. 
Rainham, Microwav (^ompuleri, 
34 High Strett TcL 0634 J76702. 
Srveiioa fcs. l\ mtSI Fielder 
Ci>mpjiei*s, Dorset StreeL 
T'rt 0732 4S&800. 
Shortlands. Hie Village Hotnc 
of Compuiers, 87 Beckenham l-ute 
Tet 01-4*0 7122, 
Sitiinsbourne- Computer Plus, 
^ High SutcL Tet 07V5 25677. 
Tunbridge Wells. Modala 
Cotnpuler Centre, 28' Kl St [ohns 

Road Iet0892il555, 

UtNCASIBJtE 
UlackpvoL Blackpool Computers 
Store,] 79 Church Street 
let 0253 20239. 

Burnley, IMO Business SyiienU, 
ly^ll Stand ish S(recL 
let 0942 44382- 



Wl. Computers <M « Igmore 
Siren. 104 Wigmore Street 
Tet Ol 486 0373. 

Wl. I-askvs, 42 Tommham Court 

Road Ttt : 01-636 n«45. 

Wl. Lion House, 227 Toiienlam 

Court Road TeL 01-637 1601. 

Wl. Sonic FOAO Micro (jenler, 

256 Totlenham Cog rt Road. 

Tel HI -5*0 582*. 

Wl, Tmramra's Work Today, 

2~ Onfftrd Street I'd 01 4»7799 

WT. WiitcnCannuten, 1 >H Evona, 

Oii. >t,i Si reeL Tef 01 -629 HSflO. 

WC1. Transam Micro Sysienu, 

59-6] TheobaldH Road 

Tel Oi-405 5240. 

W5. Laskys, |!H9 lialine Bn»d*av 

Shopping Centre, let 01-567 4717 

W8, Wallers Computers, barkers 

Kensington High Sireet 

Tet SPB7 5433, 

SB7, Vic Oddens Micros, 

5 London Bridge Walk. 
TeL (11-403 1988. 

SP,fl. Square Deal, 

373-375 Lootscray Road, 

New Ehham let 01-859 1516. 

SEIS- Castlehuru Ltd, 1 52 Rye 

Lane, Peckham Tet 01-639 2205- 

EC2. Dtsron ( "ompu ter Centre-, 

1 55 Moorgstc. tet 01-638 3339, 

N14. LoKirSak*, 19 llie Bourne, 

'The Broadway, Squtheate. 

Tet 01-882 4942, 

NJ2. Boots, 38-40 High Road, 

Wood Green. Tet 01-881 OlOl 

XWJ. .%Vavcrafl MisTus, 

58 Rossh-h Hilt Hampstead 

let 01-431 1 3<X) 

NW4. Davinci ( "omputer Store, 

112 iirent Sireeu Hendoa 

Tel ill -202 2272. 

NTW7. Computers, IiW, 86 Ciolders 

Green Tet Ol- 309 0401. 

NW1Q. Technontauc, 17 Bumkv 

Road, Wembley. TeL 01-208 1177. 
mam:hkster 

Bolton- ( : omputer Work I K I id 

208 Chorley Old Road 

Tel 0204 494104, 

Manchester, Hoots, 32 Market 

Street, let 061-832 6533. 

Manchester. Laskys, 12-14 St 

Maryi G#IC 'I eL 061-831 0268. 

Manchester. Miphtv .VulTO, 

Sherwood ("em re, 268 Wilmslou 

Road, K»llosvneld Tet 06 1 -224 8 1 1 7. 

Manchester- NSC Computer 

Shops, 29 Hanging Ditch 

TeL 061-832 2269. 

Manchester. Wallers Computers, 

Kendal Milne, Deans-gale, 
let 061-832 3414. 

Oldham. Home & Business 

Compuiers, 54 Yorkshire St reet 

Tet 061-633 IMW. 

Swiniurt, S\s Micro, 69 I'lrtinglOfl 

1 jut Tel Q61-72S 22j& 



NOTTTNtillAMSHlRE 

Newark. Jacobs Computers 

13 Middle die I eL fc.Je 1 25'*i 

Notringhairl. Tetetar, 2B0 1 lurdihgdon 

StreelTet 0602 XB5S5. 

Sutton in Ashlield UN" i t. I'ishtr. 

87 Outram Street. Jet (1623 54714. 

Worksop. Cumpuier Grahx, 

32 H 1 vJge Strett Tet (>TrJ 47224S. 
OXKORL>SIIIKt: 

Abingdon. Ivftr Fields Compolert, 

21 Stent SlreeL lei 0235 21307. 

Banbury. Computer Plus, 

2 Church Lane Tet 029S 551fiO. 

Oxford- Absolute Sounder Video, 

19 Old High Street, 1 1 radulgioa 

Tet 0865 65661- 

Oxford Science Studio, 7 l-itlle 

Clar endon Street, Tet 0665 54021 
MOTION I) 

Aberdeeo. Bools, 133-14] Union 

Street Tet 0224 585349. 

Edinburgh, Boots, 101- 103 Princes 

StreeL Tel 031-225 8111. 

Guubtow, Boots, 200 Sauchichall 
Si reel Tel; 041 -332 1925. 

Gbuaxn*. Boola, Union Street 
and%yle StrttL Tet (MI -248 7387 
Gla.»aw L Torn I Jnun Cameras, 
15'17/Qiipeen Street 
Tet tH-T-204 0826. 

SHROPS1IB3J1 

Shrewsbury, f'laimmnl 
l'jtterpnses.Tlill4 I ant 
TcL 3M7 52949. 

Shrewsbury. Cumpuierama, 13 
Cihi legate. TeL 074} W 1 ! 2K. 
Telford, ("omputer %'illage Lid 
23 Haiddine 1 louse, Central 
Square TeL 0952 506771. 
Telford- J elford iilettromCS, 
IS Mill 4. I el 0952 50491 1 
SrAFFORDSHIRI': 
NcwcHslle-under-l yoac. 
Computer Cabin, 24 The Parade, 
SiLverdale. Tet 0732 636911. 
Stafford Compulrrama, 59 
Foregaie StreeL Tet 0785 41 8W- 
Stoke-on-TrenL Compuierama, 
1 1 Market Square Arcade, Hanlev. 

Tet 0782 2b8524 

SI hVtll K 
Bury St- Ldmunds, Booti, 
11-13 C<«Tihill let 0284 701516. 
Kur\ Sl Fidmunds, Suffolk 
Computer Cent re, 1-1 (iarland 
SurtL Tet 0284 705 503. 



[ton 
Street 



Sl'RRl-i 



.HI.KShVhllH 
He^wiilL ETiorn guard Computer 
Svitrms, 46 l'ensbv Road 
Ttt OS 1-342 7 5 16. 
LtverptmL Hargreaves, 31-37 
WarbreCk Moor, wallctn. 
let 051-525 1782. 

St- Helens. Microman Compuiers, 
Rainford Indusirial F-Siate, Mill 
Lane Kainford TeL 0744 8852+2. 
SouihenrL Central Studios, 
?S Eartbank StreeL TeL 0704 31881. 

L %4i™i.BaB3L_ 
Kuiicld. Laskvs, 44-48 Palace 
(iarden StMropirie Cenlre- 
Tet 01-363 6^27, 
Harrcnr. Harrow Micro, 24 
Siinne+'eld Road TcL 0.1-427 OTO*. 
Ilounslow, Boots, 193-199 High 
Streel Tet 01- 570 01 S6 
SouthalL I wdlstarCompulera. Ltd, 

7 RettoaRoad Jet 01 574 5271. 
Teddington. Andrews, Broad 
Street Tet 01-997 4716. 
Twickenham. Twivkcnham 
Computer Centre, 72 Heath Road 
TeL 01-892 7896. 
U abridge. JKL Computers, 
7Wind»r Slreel Id 0895 51 M 5 

NORFOIK 
Norwich. Adams, 12S-129 King 
StreeL TeL 0603 22129. 
1 helford, Ihetford CB & MhTos, 
21 Guildhall Street let 0842 61645 



BajTshot V 4V H Flectiwua, 22-24 

Guudlord Road TeL 027* 71078. 

Croydon. |jwkys,77-8l North End 

let 01-681 844 J 

Crovdoo. The Vision Store, 

5 J- 59 High Stretl TeL 01-68* 63*2. 

< :roydon. The Vision Store, 
9^98 North End Tet 01-681 7539. 
South Croydon. Concise 

< :ompulcr Consultants, I ( larlton 
Road let OI-08 1 6342 
Eptocn, Ihe .Micro Workshop, 

12 Station Approach. 

Tet 0373 mm, 

Guildford. Walters Computer*, 
Army 01 Navy, 105-11 1 High SureL 
TeL 0481 68171 
WaJlingtOn. Surrev Mktu Svslems. 

1 3 WoocW Road TeL 01 -647 5636. 
Wnhing.Harpers.7l73 

,1^.^10486 225657. 
SUSSEX 
Be«.hiil-on-SeB, Cornputerware, 
W$\ l^onardiRoad 
let 0424 223140. 

Brighton. Boots, 129 North Street. 
Te±TO73 271W3L 

Brighton. Garner, 71 Fast StreeL 
Tet7E73 728681. 

Hrighton. Laskys, 1 5 1 -IS 2 Weslem 
Roal I eL 0271 725625 
Crawley. Galwick Computers, 
b? Ihe Boulevard Tel 0293 17842. 
Crawley. I askvs. 6-8 Queens wa\ 
Tet Q29? 544621 

Eaitbounie- Hoots, 1? Lastboumt 
Arrtdik Centre. 1 et 3232 7742, 

. TTVNb* WfcAJt 
.Newcastle-upon-Tyne, [kjots. 
F.ldon Square. Tel 1*12 329844. 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Laskys, 
Norihumbenand Street 
Tet 0632 617224. 
Newcasl le-upon-Tyae. 
RE Contpuling, 12 Jesmnpd Road 
TeL 0632815580. 



Cardift Randall t.uju IX 2 J High 
Street Arcade, let 0222 397162 
Mold. CI* yd E'ersonal Computers, | 
Cnil 19, Daniel Owen Precinct, 
Id 0152 56842, 
Newport. Gwcnt ("ompulcrv 
92 CSepSfflW Road 1 eL 11)611841760, 
Swansea. Hoots, 17 St Maryi 
Aivadc "I he Quadrkiril Shupptng 
Centre. Tet 0792 43461. 
Swansea. Hie Microstore, 35-36 
Smgk too Sweet Te t 0792 4S7im. 

W.UtwiLitk.SHUUE 
Coveatry. Coventry Micro Centre,] 
33 Fir i iosford StreeL 
Tet 0003 5»r»42. 
Coventry- Impulse Computer 
World. 60 Hertiord Slreel Prectnct ' 
Tet 0203 "^ T 1. 
Coventry. J LW : Micrn Semces, 4 
Barbdon Avenue, North larlldoa 
I el (1201 73813. 

Covcnliy. Laskys, l^wcr l'recuxt.1 
■let CO® 77712 

Leamington Spa. 1 C C on ipulers. I 
41 RusselTSlrret. Tet 0926 16244 
Leamington Spa, [ eamutcto 
Hobby (entn, f2! Regent Sir 
TeL 0936 29211 
Nuneaton. Micro City, la Queens 
Road let 0201 382049. 
Rdgby.0.rLM. t 9-ll Regent Street 
Tef 0788 705 22. 

HIMMIIH.AMIS 

Birmingham. Boots, City Centre 
lluusc J*-!" 7 New Street 
let 021-643 7581 
Birmingham. 1 -»kyy 19-21 
( MU HM M Slrrci 
U-l f H 1-612 o») 
Dudley, Central Computers 
35 Chorchsll Prccintl 
TeL 0384 238 169. 
Stourbridge, Wallers Computer 
Systems. 1 2 Hagjev Road 
TeL0lB4 37l>lir 

WalialL New Horuon, I Goodall 
Street TeL 0*22 202L 
West Bromwiih. OS Peakunan, 
7 Queens Squair. Tel (Hl-525 79t0,| 

VOkKSIMHt 

Bradford- Booty ] 1 I lariev Street 
Tet 0274 390X91. 

Leeds. Boots, 19 Alb™ Arcade, 
Bond Street Centre, 
let 0512 1155L 

ShclTield ljskvv 58 letipok 
Sireet Pel 07427310971 
Turk, ^'ork ( iurair-uler ( .mitt, 
7 SltHieoaic Arcade. 
TeL 1)904641862 



WALES 

Aberdare. lnkev Computer 
Services, 7[f .Md I Street, llie Square, 
Trecytwa let 0685 881828, 
Aberystwyth, Aberdata at 
( jallowavs, 23 Pier Street 
TeL 0970 61 5522. 

Cardift Boots, 26 Queens Street 

Si 105 Frederick Street 

lei 1022 31291 



micronet 



Phone 01 -278 3143 for your free information pack now! 

Micronet 800. 8 Herbal Hill, London EC1 



THE Gilbert Factor has been replaced by a Star 
rating, the basis of which is value for money. 
Programming, graphics, speed, prtwattrion 
and addictive qualities are taken into account, 
Guide to ratings; 
*****24 carat. Buy it 
***#Varuc for money 
***Nothijvg special 
* *Over-prked 
*A rip-off 



SPECTRUM 1GK 



Adventure 

Planet of Death 

Arcade 

Arcadia 

Arcadian 

Black Hole 

Blind Alley 

Cosmic Guerilla 

Crazy Cranes 

Crevasse and Hotfoot 

Cyber Rats 

Death Chase 

Earth Defence 

Escape 

Fire Flash 

Fruit Machine 

Galaxian* 

Gnasber 

Godzilla and Martians 

Ground Attack 

Horace and the Spider* 

Horace Goe* Skiing 

Hungry Horace 

Invasion Force 

Jit Pac 

Luna Crabs 

Maze Chase 

Meteor Storm 

MeteoroKis 

Mil in MoU«« 

MiUypede 

Mined Out 

Mr Wong's Loopy Laundry 

M Line her 

Orbitcr 

Pengy 

Planetoids 

Proteus 

Rider 

Road Toad 

Sentinel 

Sheer Panic 

Sil Lancelot 

Space Intruders 

Space Raiders 

Spec. Scramble 

Spectipcde 

Spectral Invaders 

Spectral Panic 

Strike Four 

Tank Battle 

Train Game 

Winged Warlord 

Yomp 

Business 

Finance Manager 
Statistics II 
Survey II 
Vu-Qdc 
Vu-File 

Education 

Chess Tutor 

Estimalur Racer 
Firework Music 
Integration 
Money 

Number Fainter 
Regression 

Language 

Beta Basic 



Artie 



3* 



3* 
3* 

3* 
4+ 
4+ 
3* 
4* 
4* 
J* 
3+ 
4* 
3+ 
3+ 
3* 
2* 
4* 
3+ 
4* 
3* 
4* 
4* 
5+ 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
1* 
4* 
4* 
3+ 
3* 
4* 
2* 
J* 
3+ 
3+ 
4+ 
4* 
4* 

Melbourne House 4* 
Quicksilva 4* 

Sinclair 3* 

Work Force 4* 

MastertronjC 3+ 

Bug- Brie 4# 

llrwsun 3* 

Spectresoft 2* 

dJVtronics 4+ 

Microsphere S+ 

CDS 3* 

Virgin 4* 



Beau Jally 
J K Grey* 
Quest 
Sunshine 

Crystal 

Voyager 

Microsphere 

Silvers a ft 

Mkrtimcga 

Artie 

New Generation 

Abacus 

DK"tn»Jcs 

Artie 

Mastertronic 

Temptation 

SiNersoft 

Sinclair 

Sinclair 

Sinclair 

Artie 

Ultimate 

Micromega 

Hewson 

Quicksilva 

DK'tronics 

l.rjthltirien 

Add-on 

Quicbsilva 

Artk 

Silvern* ft 

Silrersoft 

Micromania 

Sinclair 

Abacus 

Virgin 

DK'tronics 

Abacus 

Visions 



Practical 

Countries of the World 
Cycle Planner 
Map of the UK 

Puzzle 

Flippit 
Hanoi King 

Laps 
Nowotnik Puzzle 

Simulation 

Air Traffic Controller 

Airliner 

Golf 

NightFlite 

Print Shup 

Pro^Golf 

Strategy 

Dallas 
Dictator 

Heathrow 

Traditional 

Bridge Tutor 
Bridgcm.istcr 
Las Vegas 
Pool 
Rcversi 

Utility 

Auto Somes 
Basic Utilities 
Dietron 
Disassembler 
Editor ''Assembler 
Extended Basic 
FP Compiler 
Friendly Face 

Letterfonl 

Machine Code Test Tool 

Master Toolkit 

M Coder 

Print Utilities 

Slow Loader 

Sound FX 

Spec, Editor Assembler 

Spec Monitor 

Spectrum Super Toolkit 

Supercode 

Trace 



OCP 
E ridge 

Lotos 

Sim-lair 
Sinclair 



Artie 

Psion 

Suit Cottage 
University 

Poppy 

Psion 
University 



Ik'wwn 

Medidata 
Kuma 

Sinclair 
Contrast 
Virgin 
Phipp* 

Hewson 

Frotek 

Virgin 

Hewson 

CCS 

Hornby 



CCS 

DK'tronics 

Hewson 



CP Software 

Serin 

Temptation 

Bug-Byte 

Sinclair 

Buttercraft 
Jaysoft 

Custom 

DK'tronics 

Picturesque 

CP Software 

Softck 

Monitor 

Allansoa 

OCF 

OCP 

PSS 

Sinclair 
ELR 

DK'tronics 

Picturesque 

Picturesque 

Nectariae 

CP 

Teigate 

TLmcdata 



SPECTRUM 48K 



Adventure 



4+ 
2* 

4* 



4* 
4* 
2* 
4% 



3+ 
3* 
4* 
3* 

4* 
4* 



1* 
4* 
4* 

4* 
5* 
3* 
4+ 
4* 

3* 
3* 
3* 

4* 
4* 
4* 
5* 
4# 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
5 + 
3+ 
4* 
4+ 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 



Betasofi 



5* 
1 + 
3* 
4* 

4* 



4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4+ 
4* 
4* 



5* 



Abyss 


CCS 


3* 


Adventure ) 


Abersoft 


J* 


Alchemist 


Beau Jolly 


4* 


Amulet 


Sentient Software 


2* 


AshkerOri 


Mirrors oft 


3* 


Assignment East Berlin 


Sterling Software 


2* 


Atlas Assignment 


Virgin 


4* 


Black Crystal 


Mastervision 


4+ 


Black Planet 


Phipp* 


4+ 


Bored of the Rings 


Delta 4 


94 


Castle Blacfcstar 


SCR 


4* 


Classic Adventure 


Melbourne House 


4* 


C II Hill 


Phipps 


4* 


Colossal Caves 


CP Software 


4* 


Confidential 


Radar Games 


4* 


Crystal Frog 


Sentient Software 


3+ 


Curse of the Seven Faces 


Imperial Software 


3+ 


D. Mouse en Black Forest 


Creative Sparks 


4* 


Demon Lord 


MCE 


3* 


Detective 


Arcade 


4* 


Diamond Quest 


CCS 


2* 


Diamond Trail 


TUllifl 


4* 


Donmdark's Revenge 


Beyond 


5* 


Dungeon Master 


Crystal Comp- 


4* 


Dungeons of Doom 


TemptatJon 


2* 


El Dorado 


Atlantis 


4* 


Emerald Isle 


Level Nine 


4+ 


Erik the Viking 


Level Nine 


4* 


Espionage 


Modular Resources 2* 


Espionage Island 


Artie 


i* 


Eureka 


Dumark 


3* 


Everest Ascent 


Shepherd 


3* 



Eye uf Bain 

Fantasia Diamond 

Flight from the Dark 

The Fourth Protocol 

Frankie goes to Hollywood 

Frog Face 

GhouUcs 

Golden Apple 

Gremlins 

The Great Space Race 

Halls of Things 

Hampslcad 

Here comes the sun 

Heroes of Kara 

Hobbit 

lee Slalion Zero 

Inca Curse 

Inferno 

Invincible Island 

Island 

Jericho Road 

The Jewel of Power 

Jewels of Babylon 

Jungle Adventure 

Kent il Id 

Key of Hope 

King Arthur's Quest 

Knight's Quest 

Leopard Lord 

Lords of Midnight 

Lords of Time 

Mad Martha 

Malice in Wonderland 

The Magic Sword 

Mountains of Ket 

Murder at Manor 

Odyssey of Hope 

Oracle's Cave 

Ore Slayer 

Paradox 

Perseus and Andromeda 

Pi mania 

The Prince 

The Prisoner 

Project X 

Quest 

Quetzaltodll 

Re turn of the Joystick 

Return to Eden 

Runeslane 

Runes of ZcndOs 

The Sandman Cometh 

Satan's Pendulum 

Scoop 

Sc-Kaa of Assiab 

Sherlock 

Ship of Doom 

Snowball 

Spoof 
Supers py 
System 15000 
Temple of Vrap 

The Final Mission 
The Talisman 
The Wild Bunch 
Tir Na Nog 
Titanic 

Tower of Despair 

Transylvania* Tower 

Twin Kingdom Valley 

Underworld 

Urban Upstart 

Valhalla 

Vampire Village 

Yclnur's Lair 

Volcanic Dungeon 

War of the Worlds 

Wardor 

Width of the World 

Arcade 

A Day in the Life 
A View to a Kill 
Ad Astra 

Adven- of a Si Bernard 

Airwolf 

Alcairax Harry 

Alien 8 

Android Two 

Anl Attack 



Artie 4* 

Hewson 4* 

Hutchinson 4* 

Century. Hutchinson 5* 

Ocean 5* 

Positive [mage 4* 

IMS Software 4* 

Artie 4* 

Adventure lot 1 * 

Legend 2# 

Crystal Comp- 5 + 

Melbourne House 5* 

AUigata 4* 

Interceptor J* 

Melbourne House S* 

8th Day 3* 

Artie 3# 

Shepherd 4* 

Shepherd 4* 

Crystal 2* 

Shards 4* 

Stagger Software 4* 

Interceptor 2* 

!t.S 2* 

Micromega 3* 

Games Workshop 4 * 

Hill MacGifebo* 2+ 

Phipps 3* 

Add-on 2* 

Beyond S* 

Level Nine 4* 

Mikro-Gen 4* 

Sentient Software 3* 

Database Pubs 3* 

Incentive 4* 

Gemtime 4* 

Martech 3* 

Dork 4# 

Gamma Software 3* 

Runesofi I* 

Channel 8 4* 

Automata 4* 

CCS 4* 

Spool Software 3* 
Compass Software 4 * 

1 1 1. u snii 4* 

Virgin 4* 

Delta 4 3* 

Level Nine 4* 

Games Workshop 4* 

Dorcas Software 3* 

Star Dreams 4* 

Minatron 4* 

Sentient Software 3* 

Mastervision '* 

Melbourne House 5+ 

Artie 4* 

Level I 5* 

Runesofi 4* 

Shepherd 3* 

Craig Comm. 5* 

Incentive 4# 

Incentive 4* 

Games Workshop 4* 

Firebird 2* 

Gargoyle §* 

R&R I* 
Games Workshup 3* 

Shepherd 3* 

Bug-Byte 4* 

Orpheus 3* 

Shepherd 4* 

Legend 5* 

Terminal 2* 

Quicksilva 4* 

Mastervision 3* 

CRL 2* 

IMS Software 2* 

Muaaic 1+ 



Micromega 4* 

Domark 4* 
Gargoyle Games 4* 

Mastertronic ; * 

Elite 2* 

Mastertronic 1* 

Ultimate 5* 

Vortex 5* 

Quicksilva 5+ 



106 



SINCLAIR USER AMgua 198S 



Software Directory 



Archon 

Arena 3000 

Armageddon 

Aatronut 

Atic Atac 

Automania 

Aval cm 

Base Invaders 

Bank Zone 

■agaa 

Beach Head 
Bear Bower 
Birds and Bees 
Black Hawk 

Blade Alley 

Blue Mu 

Blue Thunder 

BMX Trial* 

Booty 

Boulder Duh 

Brian Bloodaxe 

Brian Jack's Challenge 

Bristle* 

Bruce Lee 

Bugaboo 

Bint Off 

Caesar the Cat 

Carnival 

Carpet Capers 

Cauldron 

Cave ton 

Centipoid Plus 3 

Chaos 

The Chocolate Factory 

Chequered Flag 

Chinese Juggler 

Chuckle Egg 

Chuckie Egg II 

Chuefcmari 

Close- In 

Codename Mai 
ConfiizioD 
Corridur* ol Genon 
Crusoe 
Cyclone 

Daley's Decathlon 



Ariolasofl 2* 

Micrudeal 3* 

Silversoft 2+ 

Software Projects 4* 

Ultimate i* 

Mjcru-Gen 3* 

Htwson 5* 

Wort Force 3+ 

Quicksilva 3 + 

Alan Firminger i* 

US Gold 4* 

Artie 4+ 

Bug-Byte 4* 

Creative Sparks 4* 

PSS 3* 

US Gold 3* 

Foundry Systems 3* 

Lainlan Sail ware 2 + 

Firebird 4 + 

Front Runner ?* 

The Edge 4* 

Martcch 2* 

StaTcsOfl 3* 

US Gold 4* 

Quicksilva 4+ 

Ekctric 3+ 

Mirrorsolt 4* 

Eclipse )■* 

Terminal ^* 

I'.il.u-- 5* 

Ocean 4 + 

Orwin 3* 

Games Workshop 4+ 

Hill MacGibbon 3+ 

Sinclair ^ * 

Ocean 3* 

A&F 3* 

CO Addon 4* 

PuLsouic 2* 

MictOitiega 5* 

Incentive A* 

New Generation 5* 

Automata 3* 

Vortex 4* 

Ocean 5* 



Dangcrmuuse in D. Trouble Creative Sparks 4* 

Death Chess 5000 Artie 4* 

Death Star Interceptor System 3 I* 

Delusion Incentive J* 

Delusion.' Worms K I el 2* 

Demon Chase Mansfield 2* 

Deut Ex Machina Automata 5* 

Devil Rides In Mastertronic 1 * 

Dimension Destructors Artie 4-* 

Dodge City Phocn.ii 4* 

Don't Buy Th» Firebird 2+ 

Dr Franky and the Monster Virgin ) * 

Dragonfire Cheetahsofl 3* 

Dragonlorc Hewson 4* 

Driller Tanks Sinclair 2* 

Drive In Fantasy 2* 

Energy 30,000 Elm 2* 

Eric and the Floaters Sinclair 3* 

Everyone's a Wall? Mikni'Gtn 4-* 

Exodus Firebird 2+ 

Falcon Patrol II Virgin I* 

Falkland* Crisis Lainllu Software 2* 

Fantastic Voyage QtlkksiJva ' * 

Frank N Stein PSS 4* 

F-n-d Quicksilva 3* 

Front Loop NTD Software 3* 

Galaxy Attack Sunshine 2+ 

Ghostbusters Actmsion 4* 

Gbosl Rider Positive Image 2+ 

Giant'* Revenge Tbor 2* 

Gift from tbe Gods Ocean 3* 

Gilligan'sGold Ocean 3+ 

Glass Qukksitva A* 

Gluf. Gtug CRL 3* 

Havoc Dynavision 1 * 

Harry Goes Home PuKmiic 3* 

Helicboppcr Firebird 2 * 

Hellfirt Melbourne House 4* 

Herbert's Dummy Run Mikro-Gen A* 

Hickslead CCS 2* 

High Noon Wort Force 5* 

Hunchback Ocean 4* 

Hunchback II Ocean 3* 

Hypcrsports Imagine 4* 



Icicle Works 

Invasion Body Snatch. 

Jack and the Beanstalk 

Jasper 

Jet Set Wily 

Jump Challenge 

Killer Knight 

Knight Lore 

Kokotoaj Will 

Komplev 

Krakatoa 

Kung-fu 

Laser Zone 

Lascrwarp 

Lazy Jones 

Lea Flics 

Locomotion 

Lode Runner 

Loony Zoo 

Lunar Jelman 

Magic Roundabout 
Manic Miner 
Matrix. 
Mariacs 
Metagalaclic Llamas 

Mighty Magus 
Minder 

Mission Impossible 
Mission Omega 
Monkey Biznes 
Moon Crests 
Moons ol Tantalus 
Manly is Innocent 
Mr Wimpey 
Mummy Mammy 
Munnery's Mergalroids 
Mutant Monty 
New Cylon Attack 
Nicotine Nightmare 

S'lRht Gunner 

1994 

91 ITS 

Olympimania 

Orion 

Paw* 

Pedro 

Ptnetralur 

Pi-Balled 

Pi-Eycd 

Pitfall II 

Potty Pigeon 

Psi-Spy 

Pssst 

Psytron 

Pyjamaranta 

Pyramid 

Rapscallion 

Reactor 



Statesofl 
Crystal 
Thor 
Micromcga 



2* 

5* 
3* 
3 + 



Software Projects 5* 

Martech 3 * 

Phipps 3 * 

Ultimate 5* 

Fiiic 3* 

Legend 2 * 

Ah ben 4* 

Bug-Byte 3* 

Quicksilva 4* 

Mikro-Gen 3 * 
Terminal Software 2* 

PSS J* 

Mastertronic A* 
Software Projects 3* 

Phipps 3* 

Ultimate 5* 

(Rl 2* 

Bug- Byte S+ 

Salamander 4* 

DK'tronics 4+ 

Salamander 4# 

Quicksilva 1+ 

DK'tronics 4* 

Silversoft 3 + 

Pukoilic 2* 

Artk 4* 

Incentive J* 

Comhill 3* 
Gremlin Graphics 4* 

Ocean 4* 

Lolhlorien 3* 

Abacus 3 * 

Artie 4+ 

A&F 3+ 

Atlantis 2* 
Digital Integration 3* 

Visions I* 

Elite 1* 

Automata 3* 
Software Projects 3* 

Artie 4* 

Beau jolly 4* 
Melbourne House 5* 

Automata 4* 

Automata 3* 

Activision 3* 
Gremlin Graphics 3* 

Postern 3* 

Ultimate 4* 

Beyond 5* 

Mikro-Gen 4* 

Fantasy 4 * 

Bug- Byte 3 + 

Gemini I* 



Revenge of the K . TomatoesVisions J* 

Rider Virgin 3* 

River Rescue Creative Sparks 2* 

Rohol Riot Silversoft 3* 

Rommels Revenge Crystal 5+ 

Sabre Wulf Ultimate 5+ 

Shsduwftrt Beyond 5* 

Skooldaue Microsphere 5+ 

Scuba Dive Durrell 5* 

Select 1 Computer Records 4* 

Skull Games Machine 3+ 

Sky Ranger Microsphere 2+ 

Snappk Hopper Macmillan 3* 

Software Star Addictive Games - • 

Sorcery Virgin 4* 

Space Station Zebra Beyond 3* 

Spec [run Virgin 3* 

Spellbound Beyond 4* 

Splat Incentive 4* 

Sports Hem Melbourne House 3* 

Spy Hunter US Gold 4* 

Stagecoach Creative Sparks 4* 

Star bike The Edge 3* 

Siarion Melbourne House 4* 

Slop the Express Sinclair 4* 

Strangeloop Virgin 5* 

Submarine Strike Pulmonic 3* 

Tachyon Command Century Software I * 

Tank Tras Mastertronic 2* 

Technician Ted Hewson 4* 

Tcrrahawks CRL i* 

The Guardian PSS 3* 



The Pyramid 

The Snowman 

Therbo 

3D Bat Attack 

3D Lunallack 

3D Seiddab Attack 

3D Starstrike 

3D Tank Duel 

3D Tunnel 

Tiler Tim 

Tune Gate 

Time bomb 

Tobor 

Tornado Low Level 

Toy Bizarre 

Trash man 

Travel with Trashman 

Traix 

Tribble Trubble 

Trotn 

Turtle Timcwarp 

Tutankhamun 

Two-Gua Turtle 

Underwurlde 

Wheelie 

Witch's Cauldron 

Wizard's Lair 

Wizard's Warriors 

World Series Baseball 

Worm Attack 



Fantasy J* 

(iuieksttva 4+ 

Arcade Software 2w 

Cheeuhsofl 3* 

Hewson 1 * 

Hewson i** 

Realtime software 4# 

Real Time 3* 

New Generation 5* 

Mk-K»wish 3* 

Quicksilva 4* 

CDS 4* 

Add-on 4* 

Vortex 5* 

Activities* }* 

New Generation 5+ 

New Generation 4+ 

Qukksilva t * 

Software Projects 4* 

DK'tronics 24 

Softuonc 2* 

Micromania 4# 

Lolhlorien I* 

Ultimate i* 

Microsphere A* 

Mikro-Gen 4* 

Bubble Bu* 4* 

Maslertfonik : » 

Imagine 3+ 

Pulmonic 1 * 



Worse Things Happen at SeaSil vtrsoft A * 

Wrath of Magra Mastervision 4* 

Wriggler Romantic Robot 4* 

Xadom Quicksilva 2* 

Xaviur PSS Software 3* 

Zenji Acti vision 4* 

Zig-Z«| DK'lronieji 4* 

Zombie Zombie Quicksilva A* 

Business 

Address Manager OCP 4* 

Banker Andk Software 3* 

Bank Account System K Gouldstaae 4* 

Bizzicum Merlin I* 

Cash Controller Shepherd 4* 

Collector's Pack Sinclair 4* 

Database Micml 4* 

Electric Office Fisher Software 2* 

Heathplanner Heath Computing 4* 

Hcime Budget Kuma Computers 3* 
Investment, Insurance k 

Infurmalion Inform 3 * 

Invoicing'Accounting Translorm 4* 

Keyfile Keyioft 4* 

I. it time WiJliam Stuart 2# 

Masterflk Campbell i* 

Micro-pen Contrast J* 

MiniOrficc Database Pubs 4* 

Money Manager Creative Sparks 3 * 

Multi-File ISP 3* 

Omnicalc Microsphere i * 

Personal Banking System Hilton A # 
Personal h inane. 

Profile 2 McGraw-Hill 3* 

Projector 1 McGraw-Hill ■< * 

Sales Ledger Hestacreil 4* 

Spectext McGraw Hill 4* 

Spreadsheet Microl < * 

Supertile Transform Ltd 3* 

Tasprint Tauun Software 4* 

Tasword Tasman A* 

Tasword II Tuman 5 * 

The Unitrusl Program Michael Stafford 3* 

UNISTAT University Software 3* 

Va£Track MorleyDavies 4 + 

WtJfd Processor Quicksilva I # 

Education 



Angle 


Chaiksoft 


3* 


Angle Turner 


Arnold Whcalon 


4* 


Antony and Cleopatra 


Akadamias 


4* 


Astro Maths 


Scisoll 


3* 


Astronomv 


Scisolt 


2* 


Biology 


Longman 


4* 


Blockbuster 


Campusound 


4* 


Bodyworks 


Genesis 


2* 


Castle 


I'lrisnuk-udHi 


4* 


Castle of Dreams 


Wid»t 


4* 


Castle Spellerous 


Sinclair 


4* 



conlinued on page lOti 






SINCLAIR USER August 198S 



107 



Software Directory 










































Microfilms* 


VO 2 


4* 


Wilfred the Hairy 


Micro byte 


1* 






continued from page 107 








Oe&s Tutor I 


Sinclair 


4* 


Star Gazer 


CRL 


4* 


World Cup Football 


Artk 


4* 






Giown 


Englcficld Software 2 * 


The Guide to Medicine 


Eastmead 


2* 












Cortes 


L'Ensoulciadu 


3* 


Vega Table 


Vega 


4* 


Traditional 










Dinosaurs 


Piper 


3+ 


















Disease Dodgers 


Sinclair Research 


5+ 


Puzzle 






Arc turns 


Visions 


4+ 






Dyslexia Beater 


Duniu 


4* 








Backgammon 


CP Softwan 


4* 






Eiffel Town 


Chalksoft 


3* 


Arclums 


Visioni 


3+ 


Brag 


Turtle 


4* 






Electronic Learner's Guide 


ETST 


3* 


ComptltaWOfd 


Work Force 


1 + 


Bridge Master 


Serin 


4* 






French 


Longman 


i* 


Flix 


Softricks 


4* 


Bridge Player 


CP Software 


4* 






French is Fus 


CDS 


3* 


Hare raiser 


Hare soli 


2* 


Bullseye 


Maslertromt 


2* 






Friend or Foe 


1 .iingman 


3* 


Mazrcube 


PAL 


3* 


Derby Day 


CRL 


3* 






Viking Raiders 


Firebird 


3+ 


Stuart Henry's Pap Quiz 


Beltflower 


4+ 


Do Not Pass Go 


Work Force 


3* 






German is Fun 


CDS 


4* 


3D Strategy 


Quicksilva 


4* 


Double Dealer 


MFM Software 


3* 






Highway Code 


Learning Systems 


1+ 








Draughts 


CP Software 


4* 






High wire 
Hotline 


Etlgleficld Software 2* 
Chatksoft 3* 


Simulation/Strategy 




Mind Games 
Pontoon 


Oasis 

Coniratl 


4* 

2* 






Humply Dumpiv 


Widget 


4+ 


Airline 


CCS 


4* 


Scrabble 


Sinclair 


5* 






lukiOsi 


Chalkaoft 


3* 


Alien 


Mind Games 


4+ 


Super Bridge 


Buffer Micro 


4* 






Learn to Read 1-5 


Sinclair 


4* 


American Football 


Mind Games 


4* 


Superchess II 


CP Soft ware 


4* 






Fight and Heat 


Rose Software 


4* 


Angler 


Virgin 


3* 


Superchess 111 


CP Software 


S* 






Linkword 


Stlversuft 


J* 


Arnhem 


CCS 


5* 


The Turk 


OCP 


4* 






Look Sharp 


MirrOrSolt 


4* 


Ashes 


Pul sonic 


4* 


Voice Chess 


Aatk 


S* 






Matman in the T. Caves 


Sinclair Research 


1+ 


Alram 


PD Visual 




Yatiee 


CP Software 


3# 






Macman's Mope Minor 


Sinclair Research 


4* 




Marketing 


3* 


ZX Draught* 


CF Soltware 


4* 






Mansfield Park 


Sussex 


4* 


Harrington's Squash 


New Gene ration 


3* 


ZX Rrversi 


CP Software 


4* 






Maths 


GC£ Tutoring 


3+ 


Battle for Midway 


PSS 


3+ 












Math stills EI 
MDA-PCSS 


Griffin 
MDA Assoc. 


4* 

4* 


Battle 1917 
Brewery 


CCS 
CCS 


4+ 

4* 


Utility 










Merchant of Venice 


Penguin Study 


4* 


Caribbean Trader 


East Midland 


4* 


limit ft i 


AFirmmger 


4* 






Mr T s Measuring Games 


Ebury 


4* 


Combat Lynx 


Durrell 


4* 


Assembler 


Artie 


3* 






Mr T Meet* His Match 


Ebury Software 


3* 


Confrontation 


LotUorkfl 


4# 


Assembler 


Royboc 


2* 






Musicmaster 


Sinclair 


3* 


Confrontation Scenarios 


Lothlnrien 


4* 


Beyond Basic 


Sinclair 


3# 






Nineteenth C. England 


Sussex 


4* 
4* 


Conquest 


Chectasoll 


3* 


Building Price 


J Redman 


3+ 






Oil Strike 


Sinclair Research 


Cricket Captain 


A Hanson 


3* 


Compiler 


Sl.ilrk 


3* 






Faddifigton's Garden Game Collins 


4+ 


Dix Milk 


CCS 


3+ 


Composer 


Contrast 


]# 






Pathfinder 


Widget 


4* 


Fall uf Home 


ASP 


3+ 


l-'P Compiler 


Softck 


S* 






Physics 


landman 


4* 
4* 


Fighter Pilot 


Digital Inlcgraliun 


5# 


Games Designer 


Quicksilva 


4* 






Physics 


Sciioft 


}■ lifthi Simulation 


Sine lair 


4* 


HURG 


Melbourne House 


4* 






Pint* 


Chalksoft 


4* 


Football Manager 


Addictive Games 


4* 


Keyword Extension 


Timcdata 


4* 






Postman Pat's Trail Game 


Longman 


4* 


Formula One 


CRL 


5* 


F-inhiin.iK'c 


New Generation 


4* 






Riddle of the Sphinx 


Longman 


3* 


Full Throttle 


Micromega 


4* 


Information Handling 


McGraw Hilt 


2* 






Run, kabhit. Run 


I ' iii^ni.in 


4+ 


Galaxy Conflict 


Martech 


4* 


Make Music 


Buffer Micro 


4+ 






Sequences 


tirulksofl 


3+ 


Gangsters 


CCS 


4* 


Melbourne Draw 


Melbourne House 


4* 






Snalfk 


Longman 


4* 


Gatecrasher 


Quicksilva 


4* 


Mu-nilur-'Diss. 


Sinclair 


4* 






Spacescan 


Macmillan 


2* 


Golf 


Virgui 


4* 


Music Maker 


BeUflower 


2* 






Speech Marks 


Sinclair 


4* 


Grand National 


Elite 


4* 


Paintbox 


Prim at Plotter 


4* 






Spelling Bee 


Image Systems 


3+ 


Grand Prix Manager 


Silicon Joy 


1* 


Print Utilities 


Sinclair 


4* 






Startmdwr 


Widget 


4* 


Great Britain Lid 


Hessel 


4* 


Quill 

Screen Machine 


Gilsoft 


5* 






Stuart Period 


Akadamias 


4* 


Gyron 


Firebird 


S# 


ISP 


4* 






Super Ted 


Longman 


3* 


Heathrow tnt ATI. 


Hcwson 


4* 


Sofrafx 1-2 


CP Software 


4* 






Teacher Data 


B Faxris 


4* 


Howzat 


Wyvem 


4* 


Spec. Compiler 


Sottek 


4* 






Tense. French 


Sullis 


4* 


Hunter Killer 


I'rimk 


5* 


Spectre Mac.'Mon 


Oasis 


4* 






WeathermaKter 


Sinclair* Mac mtllan 


4* 


It's Only Rock n' Roll 


K-Tel 


5+ 


Spect rovim 


Shiva 


2* 






Weather Station 


Arnold W he alo n 


4* 


Match Day 


Ocean 


3+ 


Spec! rum Extended Basic 


CP Soltware 


4+ 






Wards and Pictures 
Wonl setter 


Chalksuft 
Sinclair/Mac millan 


3* 
4+ 


Match Point 

Millionaire 


Sinclair 
Incentive 


5* 
4+ 


Spectrum Monitor 
Spectrum Sprites 


Picturesque 
ISP 


4* 
4* 






Word Wbard 


Longman 


3+ 


Mugsy 


Melbourne House 


4* 


Spectrum Super Toolkit 


Nectarine 


4* 






Worldwide 


Conflict Si Peace 


5* 


New Birkdale 


Hornby 


4* 


Supercode 11 


CP Software 


4* 






Zoo 


l.'Fnroulciadu 


3* 


New Venture 


Falcon 


2* 


The Comp. M, Code Tutor New Generation 


4* 






Language 






1484 

Oligopoly 


Incentive 
CCS 


4* 
4* 


The Illustrator 
Varitalk 


Gilsoft 

ITS Software 


5* 

3* 






Beta Basic 


Betasofl 


5* 


Olympics 


CRL 


3* 


Vu3D 


Sinclair 


4* 






Forth 


Melbourne House 


5+ 


Ove riurds 


Lothlaricn 


5* 


White Lightning 


Oasis 


5* 






Forth 


Sinclair 


4* 


Plunder 


CCS 


4* 


Zeus Assembler 


Sinclair 


5+ 






4&W Forth 
HisoJl C 


1 IK 
Hiiofl 


4* 
5* 


Red Weed 

Regards to Broadway 


Lolhlurien 
Argus 


4* 
3+ 
























Logo 


Sinclair 


5+ 


Reichswald 


MW Gametwnrld 


2 + 


f#^H 










Micro Prolog 
Snail Logo 


Sinclair 
CP 


4 + 

4* 


Royal Birkdaft 
Scatterbrain 


Ocean 
Manor 


4* 

2* 






















Spec- Forth 


Abcrsoft 


s* 


74? Flight Simulalur 


DACC 


2+ 


Adder Assembler 


Adder Publishing 


4* 






Spec. Forth 


CP 


4* 


Ski Star 2000 


Richard Shepherd 


2* 


Area Radar Controller 


Shadowsoft 


1* 






ZX Forth 


Artie 


4* 


Special Operations 


Lolhlorien 


2* 


Assembler Dev. Package 


Mrtacomcu 


5* 






Practical 






Spect realm 
Star Trader 


Runesoft 
Bug Byte 


3* 
3* 


Cartridge Doctor 
EVA 


Talent 
Westerly 


5* 
2+ 






Asirocalc 


Attrocalc 


3* 


Steve Davis Snuoker 


CDS 


4* 


GraphiQL 


Talent 


5* 






Astronomer 


CP Software 


4* 


Slunkcr* 


Beau Jolly 


5* 


GST Assembler 


Sinclair Research 


4* 






luMtH 


Be am scan 


>* 


Strike Attack 


Micnomart 


2* 


Pascal 


Computer One 


4* 






Car Cure 


Simtiun 


1* 


Super- League 


Cross 


3* 


Pascal 


Metacotnco 


5* 






Computer Cookbook 


Bug Byte 


1+ 


Super Soccer 


Winter* 


1+ 


QL Agenda 


Q-Soft 


I* 






Cricket Averages 


Spartan CC 


4-* 


Test Match 


Cooip. Rentals 


3* 


QL Cash Trader 


Sinclair 


5# 






Design your Garden 


Ulandford Press 


1* 


The Biz 


Virgin 


4* 


QL Caverns 


Sinclair 


3* 






Diet Master 


Diet Master 


3* 


The Foreat 


Phipps 


4* 


QL Chess 


Psion 


5* 






Dietician 


Krysoft 


2* 


Tmim 


Hornby 


4* 


QL Tooltii 


Sinclair 


5* 






First Aid 


Easlmead 


2* 


United 


CCS 


2+ 


Quilmerge 


Pilch Associates 


3* 






H«W Long have you got? 


Eastmead 


3* 


Video Pool 


OCP 


3+ 


Super Backgammon 


Digital Precision 


2* 






] Cbing 


Salamander 


4* 


Viking Raiders 


Fire bird 


3* 


Super Sprite Generator 


Digital Precision 


3* 






Know Your PcrsosaJky 


Mirrorsuft 


3* 


War 70 


CCS 


4# 


Typing Tutor 


Computer One 


3* 






Love Oracle 


Solar Publishing 


3* 


Whodunnit 


CCS 


4# 


Zkul 


Talent 


4* 





108 



SINCLAIR U S ER A ugusi 1985 



Software Publishers 






A & F Software, Unit 8, Canalside Industrial Estate, Woodbine Street 

East, Rochdale, Lancashire OL16 5LB 

Abacus Software, 21 Union Street, Ramsbotiom, NrBury, Lancashire 

Abbes, 20 Ashley Close, Manor Hall Drive, London NW4 

Abersoft, 7 Maesfalkn, Bow Street, Aberystwyth, Wales 

Activision, 15 Harley House, Marylebone Road, London NW1 

Adder Publishing Ltd, PO Box 143, Cambridge CBl 2EQ 

Add-on Electronics, Units 2,3 & 4, Shire Hill Industrial Estate, Saffron 

Walden, Essex CB 11 3AQ 

Addictive Games, 7a Richmond Hill, Bournemouth BH2 6HE 

ADS, S Brunchurth Street, Portsmouth, Hampshire P04 8RY 

Alan Firminger, 171 Heme Hill, London SE249LR 

Allanson Computing, 77Chorley Road, Adlingion, Charley, Lancashire 

PR6 9LH 

AUigata Software, 1 Orange Street, Sheffield SI 4DW 

Argus Press Software, Liberty House, 222 Regent Street, London Wl 

Arcade Software, Technology House, 32 Chislehurst Road, Orpington, 

KcntBR60DG 

Ariolasoft,Asphalt House, Suite 105-106, Palace Street, London SWlE 

Arnold Wheaton, Parfcside Lane, Dewshury Road, Leeds LSI) 5TD 

Artie Computing, Main Street, Brandcsburton, Driffield Y025 8RG 

Astrocak, 67 Peas-croft Road, Heme! Hempstead, Herts HP3 8ER 

Atlantis Software, 19 Prebend Street, London Nl 

Automata UK, PO Bos 78, Southsea, Hampshire 

Axis, 71 Brookficld Avenue, Loughborough, Leicestershire LEI 1 3LN 

Beau-Jolly, 19A New Broadway, Ealing, London W5 

Bellflower Software, 6 Rosewood Avenue, Greenford, Middlesex UB6 

Bctasoft, 92 Oxford Road, Moseley, Birmingham BI3 9SQ 

Beyond Software, Lector Court, 15 1 Farringdon Road, London EC1 

Bridge Software, 36 Fcmwood, Marple Bridge, Stockport, Cheshire 

Bridgemaster, Sandymouth, Beeches Road, Famham Common, 

Buckinghamshire SL2 3 PS 

Bubble Bus Software, £7 High Street, Tonbridgc, Kent TN9 1RX 

Calpac Computer Software, 108 Hermitage Woods Crescent , St Johns, 

Woking, Surrey 

Campbell Systems, 57 Trap's Hill, Loughton, Essex 1G10 1TD 

CCS, 14 I jngton Way, Blackheath, London SE3 7TL 

CDS Micro Systems, Silver House, Silver Street, Doncaster, South 

Yorkshire DN1 LHL 

Century Hutchinson, 17-21 Conway Street, London Wl 

Chalksoft, 1 7 Witlowstea Road, North wick, Worcester 

ChctUhsoft, 24 Ray Street, London EC1R 3DJ 

Clever Clogs, Liberty House, 222 Regent Street, London Wl 

Collins, 18 20 Stephenson Wav, North Cower Street, London NW1 

2RX 

Collins Soft, 8 Grafton Street, London W L 

Compusound, 32 33 Langlcy Close, Redditch, Worcester B°8 0ET 

Computatutor, 3 Thalia Close, Gr«nwich, London SE109NA 

Computer One, 32 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 4DH 

Contrast Software, Warren Road, Liss, Hampshire GU33 7DD 

Cornhill Software, 1 Penrith Way, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire HP21 

CP Software, I Glebe Road, Uxbridge, xMJddlesex UB8 2RD 

Craig Communications, PO Box 46, Basingstoke, Hampshire 

Creative Sparks, Thomson House, 296 Famborough Road, 

Famborough, Hampshire 

CRL, 9 Kings Yard, Carpenters Road, London E15 2HD 

Cross Software, 72 Swanshope, Burncy Drive, Loughton, Essex 

CSP Systems, 21 3 Stainbeck Road, Leeds 

DACC Ltd, 23 Waverley Road, Hindlcy, Wigan, Lancashire WN2 3BN 

Database Publications, Europa House, 68 Chester Road, Hazel Grove, 

Stockport, SK7 5NY 

Delta 4, The Shieling, New Road, Swanmore, Hampshire 503 2PE 

Design Design, 1 Ashton Way, East Herrington, Sunderland SR3 3RS 

Digital Integration, Watchmour Trade Centre, Watchmoor Road, 

Camherky , Surrey GU 1 5 3 A J 

Digital Precision, 91 Manor Road, Higham Hill, London E17 

DK'tronics, Unit 6, Shire Hill Ind Est, Saffron Walden, Essex CB 1 1 

Domark, 204 Worple Road, London SW20 

Dorcas Software, 3 The Oasis, Glenfleld, Leicester 

Dunitz, 1 54 Camden High Street, London NW I ONE 

Durrcll Software, Castle Lodge, Castle Green, Taunton TA1 4AB 

Dymond Software, 21 Hospital Road, Annan, Dumfriesshire DG12 

Dyns vision Production Studio, PO Bos %, Lufon LIB 2JP 

East London Robotics, St Nicholas House, The Mount, Guildford, 

Surrey GU2 5HN 

Easimead, Eastmead House, Lion Way, Camherlcy, Surrey GUI 6 5EZ 

8th Day, 18 Flaxhill, Morcton, Wirral, Mcrseyside LU6 7UH 

Electric Abacus, Oaklands House, Solartron Road, Famborough, Hants 

Elite Systems, Anchor House, Anchor Road, Aldridge, Walsall, West 

Midlands WS9 8 FW 



Elm Computers, 59 Batcman Road, East Leake, Loughborough, 

Leicestershire LE 1 2 6NN 

Engkfteld Software, High House, Mill Street, Buxton, Norfolk NR10 

5JE 

Fantasy Software, Fauconberg Lodge, 27a St Georges Road, 

Cheltenham, Gloucestershire 

Fawkes Computing, 41 Wolfridgc Ride, Aheston, Bristol BSI2 2RA 

Feb* Software, 19 Leighton Avenue, Pinner HAS 3BW 

Firebird Software, Wellington House, St Martins Lane, London WC2 

Fisher Software, 47 London Road, Buxton, Derbyshire 

Fiilwood, 20 Templestowe Hill. Whitkirk, Leeds LSI 5 7EJ 

Games Machine, 40 Fretheme Road, Welwyn Garden City, 

Hertfordshire ALS6NU 

Gamma Software, 12 Milvenon Road, London NW6 7AS 

Gargoyle Games, 74 King Street, Dudley, West Midlands 

Gavin Barker, 12 Fleming Field, ShottonCoLlicrv, County Durham 

DH6 2JF 

GCE Tutoring, 40 Brinners HiU, Widner End, High Wycombe, 

Buckinghamshire 

Gemini Marketing, Unit 21, Dinan Way Trading Estate, Exmouth, 

Devon EXE 4RS 

Gcmlime Software, 16 Ben Ledi Road, Kirkcaldy, File KY2 5RP 

Genesis Productions, 30 Great Portland Street, London WIN SAD 

Gilsoft, 30 Hawthorn Road, Barry , South Glamorgan, South Wales 

Gouldstone, 45 Burleigh Avenue, Wallington, Surrey SM6 7UG 

Granada Publishing, 8 Grafton Street, London W I X 3LA 

Gremlin Graphics, Alpha House, 10 Carver Street, Sheffield SI 4FS 

Griffin & George, Frederick Street, Birmingham Bl 3HT 

Haresoft, PO Box 365, London NW1 

Harlequin Software, 43 Osprey Park, Thombury , Bristol BS12 1 1. Y 

Hartland Software, 32 Ivor Place, London NW1 6DA 

Heinemann Computer Education, 22 Bedford Square, London WClB 

Hessel, 15 Lythan Court, Cadwell Crescent, Snnningdale, Berkshire 

Hcstacrest, PO Bon 19, Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire LU7 0DG 

Hewson Consultants, 56B Milton Trading Estate, Milton, Abingdon 

Hildcrbay, 8/10 Parkway, Regents Park, London NWl 7AA 

Hilton Computer Services, 14 Avalon Road, Orpington, Kent 

Hisoft, 180 High Street, Dunstable, Bedfordshire LUfi 1 AT 

Hodder & Stougbton, PO Box 6, Dunmn Green, Sevenoaks, Kent 

TNI3 2XX 

Homesiudy Ltd, Treleigh Woods Farm, Treleigh, Redmih, Cornwall 

TR16 4AW 

Homby Software, 21 Penfold Hill, Leeds LS150FW 

Icon Software, 65 High Street, Gosforth, Tyne and Wear N E3 4AA 

IMS Software, 143. '145 Uxbridge Road, Ealing, London Wl 3 9AV 

Image Systems, 34 Lynwood Drive, Worcester Park, Surrey KT4 7AB 

Imagine (84), 6 Central Street, Manchester xM2 SNS 

Impact Software, 2 New Street, Cuilompton, Devon EX 15 lHA 

Imperial Software, Imperial House, 153 Churchill Road, Poole, Dorset 

Incentive, 54 London Street, Reading, Berkshire RG1 4SQ 

Inform Software, 3 Treesdale Close, Birkdale, Southport PR8 2EL 

Interceptor Micros, Lindon House, The Green, Tad Icy, Hampshire 

Interstella Software, 82 New Forest Drive, Brockenhurst, Kent 

ITS Software, 33 FdKOtt Road, London NW4 3SE 

JK Greye Software, 16 Park Street, Bath, Avon BAl 2 TE 

JRS Software, 19 Wavside Avenue, Worthing, Sussex BN13 3JH 

Kemp, 43 Muswell Hill, London N10 3PN 

Key soft , 6 Bruce Grove, Tottenham, London N 1 7 

Kosmos Software, I Pilgrims Close. Hartington, Dunstable, 

Bedfordshire LU5 6LX 

Kuma Computers, 12 Horseshoe Park, Pangboume, Berkshire RG8 

7JW 

Learning Systems, 1 1 Warwick Court, Princes Drive, Harrow, Middx 

HA1 4UB 

Legend, PO Box +35, London E4 7LX 

Leisure Genius, 3 Montague Row , London Will 1 AB 

Lena, 10 Brunswick Gardens, Corby, Northamptonshire 

Level Nine, 229 Hugenden Road, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire 

HP13 5PG 

Llainlan Software, Pontybcicm, Llanelli, Dyfed, Wales 

Longman, Longman Group, Longman House, Harlow, Essex CM20 

Lothlorien, 56a Park Lane, Poynton, Stockport, Cheshire SK12 IRE 

Macmillan Software, 4 Little Essex Street, London WC2R 3LP 

Manor Software, 24 Manor Gardens, London SW20 

Manx Tapes, Garey Vcg, Glen Audlyn, Ramsey, Isle of Man 

Martech Games, 9 Billingburgh Road, Eastbourne. East Sussex BN20 

Mastertronic, (as for Mastcrvision) 

Mastervision, Park Lome, 1 1 1 Park Road, London NWS 7J[, 

McGraw Hill, Shoppen Hangers Road, Maidenhead, Berkshire 

continuiid an ptlgt 110 



SINCLAIR USER Augttti I9SS 



1 09 



Software Publishers 



continued from page 109 

Medidata, PO Box 26, London NW9 9fi W 

Melbourne House, Castle Yard House, Castle Yard, Richmond TW 10 

Metacomco, 26 Portland Square, Brisiol BS2 8RZ 

Michael Slatford, 3 Campden Road, South Croydon, Surrey CR2 7EQ 

Micro Dealer UK, Unit 6 Marlborough Road Trading Estate, Lattimorc 

Road, St Albans. Hertfordshire 

Micro Wish, PO Box ] 5, Colne, Lancashire BBS 9DR 

Microbyte, 19 Worcester Close, Lichfield, Siaffordshin: 

M i c rucosm, 68 The Glade, Clayhall, Ilford 

Micromania, 14 Lower Hill Road, Epsom, Surrey KT 19 8LT 

Micromega, 2 JO/236 lavender Hill, London SW1 1 

Microsphere, 72 Rosebery Road, London N 10 2LA 

Mikro-Gen, 44 The Broadway, Bracknell, Berkshire RG12 I AG 

M matron Computing, 34 Pinewood Close, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol 

BS9 4AJ 

Mind Games, Liberty House, 222 Regent Street, London Wl 

Mirrorsoft, PO Box 50, Bromley, Kern BR2 9TT 

Monitor Software, Suite 1 1 , 526-8 Watford Way, London NW7 

Mosaic, 187 Upper SlrecL, London N) IRQ 

MW Gamesworld, 12 Lawnswood Avenue, Chasetown, Walsall WS7 

Myrmidon Software, PO Box 2, Tadworth, Surrey, KT20 7LU 

Naigram Software, c/'o Soho Synth House, ISA Soho Square, London 

Nectarine, 837 Yeovil Road, Slough SLl 4JH 

New Generation Software, FREEPOST, Bath BA2 4TD 

Newsoft, 12 White Broom Road, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire 

Oasis Software, 12 Walliscoie Road, Weston-Super-Mare, Avon 

Ocean Software, 6 Central Street, Manchester MZ SNS 

OCP, 77a Packhorse Road, Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire SL9 8PQ 

Odin Software, The Podium, Steers House, Canning Place, Liverpool, 

LI8HN 

Orpheus Ltd, Unit 1 , Church Farm, Hatley St George, Near Sandy, 

Bedfordshire SG 19 3HP 

Orwin Software, 26 Brawnlow Road, Willesdcn, London NW109QL 

Palace Software, The Scala, 2nd Floor, 27S Pentonvilk Road, London 

PO Visual Marketing, Thanet House, Craven Road, London W2 

Penguin, 536 King's Road, London SWIO 

Phipps Associates, 172 Kingston Road, Ewcll, Surrey 

Phoenix Publishing, 14 Vernon Road, Bushey, Hertfordshire WD2 2JL 

Picturesque, 6 Corkscrew Hill, West Wickham, Kent BR4 9BB 

Pitch Associates, 39 Rockkigh Avenue, Lcigh-on-Sea, Essex 

Poster Gaines, 24 Parsloes Avenue, Dagenham RM9 5NX 

Foppysoft, The Close, Common Road, Headley, Newbury, Berkshire 

Positive image Software, 129 Dumbarton Road, Glasgow 

Print V Plotter Products, 19 Borough High Street, London SE1 9SE 

Protek Computing, la Young Square, Brucefield lad Park, Livingston, 

West Lothian 

Psion, 2 Hunisworth Mews, Gloucester Place, London NWl 

PSS, 452 Stoney Stanton Road, Coventry CV6 JDG 

Pulmonic, Warwick Distribution Ltd, 3 Standard Road, Park Royal, 

London NW106EX 

Q-Soft, PO Bos 90, Bam«, Hertfordshire ENS 5RN 

Quest International Computer Systems, Gillingham House, 38-44 

Gillingham Street, London SWI 

Quicksilva, Liberty House, 222 Regent Street, London Wl 

Radar Games, 53 Flavel Street, Woodsctton, Dudley DY1 4NU 

RAM Writer, 3 Vumba House, 2 Cedar Gardens, Sutton, Surrey 

Ram top Services, 5 Rue D'Artois, 75008, Paris, France 

Realtime Software, PlWpect House, 32 Sovereign Street, Leeds LSI 

Red Shift, 1 2c Manor Road, Stoke Newingtou, London N l& 5SA 

Richardson Institute for Conflict and Peace Research, Depl of Politics, 

University of Lancaster LA) 4YF 

Romantic Robot, 77 Dyne Road, I*ondon NW6 7DS 

Rose Software, 148 Widney Lane, Solihull, West Midlands 

Runt soft, Chamwood House, Crossgatc Drive, Nottingham NG2 TLW 

Sentient Software, Branch House, 18 Branch Road, Armley, Leeds 

L512 3AQ 

Scisoft, 5 Minister Gardens, Newthorpe, Eastwood, Nottingham NG16 

SCR Adventures, 190 Shelboume Road, Tottenham, London 

SD Microsystems, PO Box 24, Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG4 DAE 

Selee Software, 37 Councillor Lane, Cheadlc, Cheshire 

Serim Software, Freepost, Dcpt SU7, PO Box 163, Slough, Berkshire 

SL2 JYY 

Shadowsoft, 70 Gooseacre, Chcddington, Bedfordshire 

Shards, Suite G, Roycraft House, 15 Linton Road, Barking, Essex 

Shepherd Software, Elm House, 23-25 Elmshott Lane, Chippenham, 

Slough, Berkshire 

Silvereoft, London House, 271/273 King Street, London W6 9LZ 

Sinclair Research, 25 Willis Road, Cambridge CB 1 2AQ 

666, POBox 190, Maidenhead, SL6 1YX 



5 logger Software, 215 Beacon Road, Chatham, Kent 

Soft Tech, 31 Lampits, Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire 

Sorrel, 5 Durward Drive, Glenrothes, Fife KY62LB 

Software Cottage, 19 Westfield Drive, Loughborough, Leicestershire 

LE113QJ 

Software Farm, 3rd Floor. 16 Charlotte Street, tendon WJ 

Software Projects, Bear Brand Complex , Allerton Road, Woolton, 

Liverpool, Merscyside L2S 7SE 

Spartan CC, 29 Fettham Avenue, East Moseley, Surrey KTS 9BJ 

Spectadraw, 1 Cowieaze, Chinnor, Oxfordshire OX9 4TD 

Spectrasoft, Capital House, Market Place, London W3 6AL 

Spoof Software, 58 Railway Road, Cmision, Manchester M3| IXT 

Star Dreams, 17 Barn Close, Seaford, East Sussex, BN25 3EN 

Startersoft, 32 Parkficlds, Chippenham, Wiltshire 

Statesoft, 29 Burro wfield, Wclwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire 

Stell Software, 36 Limefield Avenue, Whallcy, Lancashire BBS 9HJ 

Sterling Software, Garfield House, H6fS$ Edgeware Road, London, W2 

Stratagem Cybernetics, 286Corbin Plate, 2E, Brooklyn, New York 

11235 

Sulis Software, 4 Church Street, Abbey Green, Bath BA I 1FP 

Sunshine Books, 12' 13 Newport Street, London WC2 

Sussex Publication, Townsend Pouishot, Devizes, Wiltshire SNIO ISD 

System 3, Smith Bank House, Black Prince Road, London SEI L 

Talent Computer Systems Curran Building, 101 St James Road, 

Glasgow G4 0NS 

Taskset, 13 High Street, Bridlington, Yorkshire YOI 6 4PR 

T asm an Software, 17 Hartley Crescent, Leeds LS6 2LL 

Temptation Software, 27 Cinque Ports Street, Rye, East Sussex 

Terminal Software, Derby House, Derby Street, Bury BL9 0NW 

Texgate, 14 Brook Lane, Corfe Mullen. Wimbournc, Dorset 

The Edge, 31 Maiden Lane, Govern Garden, London, WC2E 8LH 

Think Tank, 35 Wellington Road, Wimbledon Park, London SW19 

Thor Computer Software, Erskine Industrial Estate, Liverpool L6 1AP 

Tiriiedata, 16 Hemmclls High Road, Laindon, Basildon, Essex SSI 3 

Transform, 41 Keats House, Porchesicr Mead, Beckenham, Kent 

Tutorial Software, L Vilands',Gksllwch, Lane, Newport, Gweni NP1 

Ultimate Play the Game, The Green, Ashby de la Zouch, Leicestershire 

LEG 5JU 

Unicom Micro Systems, 312 ChartttinSter Road, Bournemouth BH8 

University Software, 29 St Peters Street, London Nl 

US Gold, Unit 10, The Parkway Industrial Centre, Hcneagc Street, 

Birmingham B7 4LY 

Vega Space Systems, 28 Watford Road, St Albans AL1 2 AJ 

Virgin Games, 2 4 Vernon Yard, London Wl I 

VO 2 , 9- I0A The Bridge, Walsall. West Midlands 

Vortex software. Vortex House, 24 Kansas Avenue, oil South 

Langworthy Road, Saiford, M5 2GL 

Widget Software, 48 Durham Road, London N2 9DT 

Winters, 24 Swannington Close, Qmtlcy, Doncastcr, South Yorkshire 

Woosoft, 5 Andrews Close, Robertsbridge, Sussex TN32 5PB 

Workforce, 140 Wilsden Avenue, Luton, Bedfordshire 

Wyvern Software, 2 Princes Building, George Street, Bath BAI 2ED 



ZXWORD 

SOLUTION 



Across 

4 , Indirect 

8. Kempston 

9, Data area 

10. Absolute 

11. Break 

12. Mass 

14. Hundredth 

15. LD 

17, TV 

18. Coherence 
2L Skip 

22, Video 

23, Gray code 

24, Test data 

26, Mikrogen 

27. Tricycle 



Down 

1 , Keyboard 

2. Spools 

}. Siructured 

4. Indexed 

5. Dot 

6. Read rate 

7. Ceelax 

13. Benchmarks 

16. Domestic 

17. Twiddles 
19, End game 
2ii Linear 
21. Sector 
25. ADC 



110 



SINCLAIR USER August WS 




'/ ^ — ~ ^^ JS? ■ 7 g m_ _^ £_ __£ 



- First company in aft U K. to introduce wHHe-uwait \ 
i tervlcm. How first to o ffer an international repair service. \ 

Z A\ I hat* corcw urTHii* a firm Itial will lw more than willing i« mMm you as to how j 
E 9 in remedy your prahlfm. Tliev ore- caakd MANCOMP. nn4 >■ well as repairing : 
^ foullv Specimms, err also fluile uniting in discuss vctuT problems with ■ 

- vdu And offer reasnnalily cheap, and (mnr* Importantly! MC1*Ct airt*s +7 

l-Hll. ROGERS 'Pet* * Pnkf' ! 

= POPULAR COMPUTING WEEKLY" 

; itttwrnty 1985 (Vol IV No 1) 

E -♦£ Mu Spectrum biew recentrv I '«« k " to Mancomp urha lined it in *ighi A 

: 9 minutes' Undlmfe than £ 10. They ■» local clued up. *nd htadlngly erfirkiii «P 

r COMFLiTLRLOUJMNdHEATONS 

Z DKitijT Vol 1, No-. 11 

E ^ One -firm ol letf i an usually effect liny necessary repirtr over Hie coaata in 

J A fcwly five rMlMtMf. Based in MBrwh*al*r, Mancomp can offer what it m 

- ajquablv (he fwiesi turnaround in llie business to ptfiMiial coHri* y 

CRASH MAGAZINE, JUNE 1985 r 



SPECTRUM SOFTWARE HIRE 

F REE MEMBERSHIP 

We ofler prompt personal service, 

all top titles. Send SAE for Hire 

Details to: 

SSH ISLJI. 

21 Ch ace ley Way, Willord 

Nattingriam NG11 7EG 



SINCLAIR REPAIRS 

Spectrum and Z)Ws repaired quickly 

lor C12.50 + pans and postage. We- do 

printers tool Sendrbring win fault 

symptoms 1o" 

TECHNICOM SERVICES 

(South West) 

80. Catalan Strtel, Bristol BS1 5BB 

pc Tel: 093483 3460 

(Closed Saturdays) 




I PHONE/ SEND SPECTRUM 



j FOR FREE LSTIMATES. EN C £1.60 ( U.K. I .P.M. EIRE, CJ ) 
j £2J0 (EUROPE & SCANWIAV1A) • NO HIDDEN 
HANDLING CHARGES • 24 HOUR TURNAROUND 
: ilOPEN TILL 7 P.M. MON - SAT • KEYBOARD 



Qmancompltd. 

Manchester M19 3JP- 

Tel: 061*224 1888 




data director !EK™ MTI 

«, tuitr *j'0M«ir, lows*"- swiichnc. 

* £IGhN.C(EJU|.lJI>CinCU|l * SHCrRMH B*rjff$W0H 
IHDUIOKIH LOU**!! WH 
* Burt in tonn uiwrm win vOiUME ccwraw. 
• DOES HWT USE 'H 
SFKIHUM £)(P*H5lOW FORT 
• M FSirr-HIHi HLUU*ttD 
II* jf.1.". LIRfriHF MMiliraf, llw 
Uil ul mhio »i"! wrfij prcyiMK 
hUT. j dun u i uifm 

OmVC?ff.SStf*!rJaiMfl 

- in* Mf ^ W #S" # 

iin n h iwi *n mi 

t in i If. ItMTlirir 
£W<.a*jMHHH 




FAULTS W 



TKOPLE REQLilREI 

EARN £10 ■ tlW P" *«** 
with yum" Home Compuicr 

VdJ S,A,£ fat itrmli 

COMPl'TER LINK IJ.K. 
U l r(«rf KtNul. Alsagsr. 
snAc-w ln?ni 



USE VTX SOW on Bulletin 

boards, PSS «nd TELECOM 

QOLD using SPECNET1 

Oifwt users need spectrum to 
operate) a modem. File Transfer, con- 
trol chr$_ ir^nsrer la (ape, mictodrwo 
ate. £5 95. Vecaion II (Auto fseodj'- 
receive. Uppar/Lowor case lor Telex, 

Mail Btcl E6.95. 

Stephen Adams 

1 Lctswin Road. London NIC TNL 

Telephone: 01-354 186B 



PROFESSIONAL REPAIRS 

rfce cimptvtt Sinelilr Strvlet centre 

H-S1 E13.SS 

ZXltKrUM EH Jl 

IX Inlertau Z SI 3-55 

zxifiitrft»1... .., tiTSS 

ZX Migrqdrlw C1T.95 

ZX Spectrum E1T.S5 

zx Primer £"■» 

SmcliirllL , P.D.n 

16K 10 4»K UBgDde E».«9 

flWC 0234-21 JC*5 HOW 

t IBmiur (lmufnura ■ ifflDflDl »hh»tI 

. Jill mclnnw ■ Fr*F Himitn 

iNhj BBC. t*WH*"f H Dm Clngni. **■ «ml fciiu?in 

ZEDEM COMPUTERS LTD 

Z HInillllei Red Sartorf MK40 2NH 
(Trirle enqjlrles mrtlconi) 



SPECTRUM REPAIRS 

We- eicpefOy repair Specuums tor 
£17 inclusive of parts, labour and 
return postage. Speclryms up- 
graded to *8K lor £34 including 
posl. 

R.A.ELECTRONICS 

Oept SU. 133 London Road South, 

LowesloM HR3 0QZ 

Tel: IQSD2I 662*9 



THE HOME COMPUTER SHOP 

Ear the latest software tnies. Tap 5o usually always m stock Alsn keyboards. 

ioyslicks+WaceiS. lighl pens. R.G.B.Modulog tor Ihs Spedrum. pfinlers. Up* 

grades, 2xat push button keyboards. E3 

AUGUST SPECIAL OFFER 

SPECTRUM PLUS COMPUTER PLUS FREE SIX PACK OF SOFTWARE 

PLUS DK'TRONICS DUAL PORT l/FACE AND QS II JOYSTICK (CI 56) 

ALL FOR ONLY £142. 

WAIL ORDEH CUSTOMERS PLEASE ADO C3 DO PiP 

4 Roman by Rd, Northallsrlon, North Yrjrka DLT BNH 

Tel: (0609) 77*1M 



COMPUTER REPAIRS 
IN SOUTHEND 

SPfCtRUM BBC. eiFCTflQN CBMW.VICW 
TiS BS inc tans. VAT arm pit 

MINNIE MICRO ELECTRONICS 

12 Eastern Esplanade. Southend 

Tel: 0702 62033^615809 

Open 7 days a Week 



SPECTRUM REPAIRS 

GUARANTEED SIX MONTHS 

l-ipcrll. rcpjind jjid l!iDt:-ug'ii> Dvir^hfaM br P'D- 
IbsotjI cmrpjlr wlfglmin i*rt) art) He gild* 

lign; ltIiIM ind ill nil ll ■ I lnlt) (>ilfirmifl Ifli I 



130 OS. All InetHrv* 

MP ELECTRONIC SERVICES 

It* Lwnl*. *Mli|, lin^— . hrlifel M1I Hi 

TEL 0362 87327 



SINCLAIR REPAIRS 



SPECTRUM C 17.95 

ZX-fll /PRINTER 14,95 

mo aidiStTo: c»i 

5*nd yoo nmy i*«( •"« Stio^*En or 

MCE SERVICES, 
33 ALBERT STREET, 
MANSFIELD NOTTS. 

TEL: 0623 31202^ 



SINCLAIR SERVICE CENTRE 



Fasl repair si'yict for Sokhuti ZXBl 
l«11ertiC« 1 Micrwlnw All wi.15. repairrt In 
Original slandaid usmg oenuine Sandaii 
spares by our HNC qusillliod iuH iyrrngr 
repair costs D5 00 OUT estinutn i;su«o 
a-u(DnialiHi1|f mould Iht tos1 til renjir 0* 
over CW 00 All Sped rum hEytMard lamts, 
E1D DO *Bhr turn round on mcrsr 
Cowboys came In all stupes and Mm SO 
don'l be CMght gut, una you iiml la ui wiin 
1 One! dlscript«n of your dull ID' 

QUANTUM 

33 City Arcade Cavenlra. CV I JH), 
ar pnene ctmnim (07915 7*6j? 



PREMIER LEAGUE 

A SUFIRB NEW Krjrjif BAU MANAGEMENT 
STRATEGY GAME FDR TH£ *t* S»*EtTHUJil 
AT LAST 1 A laatball gamt lor Ihc SanouB 
tntlii^iast— Using ll»e FULL mr-mQirj pi yipyr 
Spedrum FFAHJBFS INCLUDE Training. 
Team Sslactiain Substitutes. Ha H -lime 
scores Full squad rjetails. Named G.oa! 
siorers. Team styles Save Game. Financial 
ti'o&iems. f^-ui MANV. MANy M0RF' 

STfP SKEWING - SW MKH&m 
Upl 0i*r snlf - UNBl*TMLt ¥*LI2 H Et.75 

E S j SOFTWARE 

59 Stalnaan Raid Fntivtd MiBrtr EH J UP 



15% if AT SHOULD BE ADDED TO THE GROSS COST OF CLASSIFIED DiSPLAY ADS 



SINCLAIR USER Auvatl985 



1U 



FRSTCGnRJTRREPHIRS 



= VIDEO VAULT INTERNATIONAL = 
10* REPAIR SERVICES ■ 

■aaaai Sp K tnim*repiiredl!»r£l9.95inc.Pam.lnsuranfnindP&PNoHkJd«nE*trat. ■ 
■I BBC Comnwitore64.V(f 20.ftl*ri,Qn<Jt«i*iH. 

B Af t you Wi w urtlh waiting meeks for your Hum? Cr.mpin.rr to be repm tram 
■™ Why no* try Irw Experts, w* i>K*r a hill repair smite on any Hume Lompulrr. I 

■ All repairs tarry a Ml 3. months guarantee, pi urn" *v*ry Spectrum repaired we | 
send y™ a Iree gamr mttnti £5.95 fin your enjovrrienl arid pl*MliW IV 

■ + While ym watlt S*rrk:* by Prof*»*au.(i*.l CimpiiHr Englncar*- 
| * 3 Month' written g««rtal«c « all rtpathra. 
International rapjalr cp«(u»v. 

All coaaputcra *eiit by TeiaiJ order fumed around In *■ nra. 
M«t Sp*rt™ai* repaired urithin 45 aaalesaitefl. 
All Microe inaured lor t¥<*utbj joumrv- 
Opu 7 day* a nrwk. 

Srhool repair* n«d«rt«taB-*lMoaiiilB available. 
Fraa aoftwar* aver* each Sp«rtni« repaired rnmwth L5 .*-■>- 
Ov*r B iwara ««a*rience working with cDaapailwr*. 
OMVGLNUINF- SINCLAIR PARTS USED. . *. , E 

Plmne today he v«» *«*" estlnnH* or «nd your c-umputer lu u* urtlh E1.7S 
(UK EIHE 1 O.M, CI.) or £6.50 (Europe ,' Scandinavia) me will rnniact y ou the 
Hnw dan by phon* «f 1*1 class Mail ififjuld vmi r*-«ulre quotat^n ftrsi ^M 
TRAOF ENQUIRIES MOST WELCOME. ACCESS WEUOMI.UCiJ 

VIDEO VAULT LTD L>pi 91 THE L0GKA1 i HOK I 



■ 
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I 

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I 
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Telephone- Glnw«ip (STD (1457+1 tifeSSS. 

140 Hs'jh Si, \l'«i, Eiiossup. lierhyvliirr. E.ngla 




cOLorrz Ese*« wo* wc arcine eama with 1 1 

lunm. Climb ropes, dfM»»o bullBla. aaercJillnriti 
Wld ous>d* ind collect OOltf bare. Sflnd f4 [d 
PSYCM50FT, 134 BarrOwsat™ RDsd, Chlswlca,. Lon- 
bcnvY4,«QP 

SfMOUS UHIUAS wort Our, b«a practialy w'lh 
Settlsr' 30 diftsrtni beta -niiudmg ■*=" w *r, 
tuocr hc-iM. »*n«*e i*.95 M Wood, 23 Henliy 
Clnin, Ne«0rt. W-.rra! Ltd 05Q Uu on UK Spec- 
trum. 

JU>VtMTUflERS NEtP HtXP an Valkyrie 1?. Fanti- 
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Croroar, Hint. Pirk. Paulson. Bnatol 851* SL« 



I SKCTRUil CLUB Onlv I5JB "'• ">•">■ 

tip ind fait jet yiM* flr»t game 10 i*nt Frea. 

flwrl froni 50-CI»|t "rrta now. Zehtmm 4*. PO 
BdiM. Ridlen. M»n( WDT 7LX. Or 1*1 H*dlnn MPS 
Fof dpljih 

TVtE CHEAKST SMCTRUM mHwa'e in ih» UK. 
F'or ED(lV>*f« Club mamborjhip. Hfl(jKt4arwiHln'- 
■ry loonnaliyl ?*hr. Don'l d4t tUsp orKB*. &a£ In 
BrBirriklin. 11 P«ri Hill Road. London £J JED. 

-aOXMS' AftGJWe «K Sptarum, 7 plivtri gami 
indudat dflmo, pur<:l«s. 3D rina, Jiar ir-.cndlv. 
OKI. Ilm» colour, lound, only «'^ 06. (and chKwa' 
PO u> flradtay Clultprt. B€ RaHlagh Oirdem, lllnrd. 

e*«i hjt iff. 

OL C0M*UTEN complrl* w<1ti ill manual* and 
DMiKlr.Mwa. Alirj pile <H rfi<*V«nt mngBainBt and 
■eim iibnnn tooVi L-i'le NtHd f.liQ Hcadino 
B7*TH 

«K SPtCfRUM L*a,n «aal IjsvtKhprd, MriBrlaca Oft*, 
rnierorlfivn fclphBao^ 3? p'mler. Kuripilnn |*y»- 
Ikh .m«rfau. inrrna.U 14)1 for ttSO. HotBrt CUn- 
ranaharn. S fia>nl Juraepha T»rri£«, CgrnckTMroet. 

Cc Monag?iar., Ireland 

INT5H»*tE TWO PIUS UUatlCSMOT H toyctldt HKl 
BtmfY BOM ■nfnrara, All in jom) candidal WI4 
««rt(ln« ard«r. Phon* WS? 4*1568 jflar ft.30 (Wl. 

KM SALE SKCTBUMKE*Kl*Ml-S-sgj 1 Eiripater 
mtl R«s»1 !«<!;* ami two en!*' k"V" £*0ana Tel 

01 J» rssi 

£1 10 WOflTH Of &AM6& Hnr J*K SofKiiiiufP NM Oi. 
Ail rrccnl mhw*'* Arde to Richard B»rlnui. U 
ChhiviIhi Road, taltwfl. ScunBn*rp*. Suvllh H«im 
ber«d>, ON 17 tfS 

SPeCTHUM «K ■ PBHUTEH lapd das*, manuiti, 
aDoiTed acrfwa**. aaprow vi*luB E2W. V^ur* ' Q r 
C150dniS Raifl tvrnirintafi (CMOJ 7F319 »«a. (nr Mr 
Jan EK* 

NEXT II Tht migarine devoned miiraly Id thu 
ZXB1 fleviawn, primrimi, poiljit an* ks1» man. 
Send l**fl* SA£ ■ncTtl.OOfaiMWP. ?« HyntMFDDir 
Raad, T*ptoy. BaMngxlaliE, Harm. nGW BSK. 

HWVTS AMD POKES ISSUE I ova ilatH* now Appran 
rOO name* «0V*rad par laaue. P'U&i for your moat 
original Sips. Hnr I1.U 1 1.35 CurDpel 10 M & D 
SeHTi**a (SUI 1 JM AaJilpn Old Roid. H^har Open 
ihm» Manc;h«1er Mil UG. 

WMTTEAJ AH MARKETABLE MACHINE COOE 
.jlil-H-.'APV'Arcadc prografil l*l*l»? 11 ao lend in 
.l»nc» in eachaiigie tor royaltia* 1o - Dicllal 
Oe»lflnt, IS! Marmian A**. Chingford. Landan 
Tel 6l-*2a <1?«B 

MASSIVE ADVENTURE 6*M£ JliO - iDcanmn*. 
feHura* include corhba: ivsinm, random mr>ni- 
Btw. M^e and load 1*Cilfly. uridar^aaid» OiWJi 
msrtft aand fJ.M le HO Snyfiwaro, & Hanjlay 
T «raca Spenrrvneor. Cayniy Durham 



PAf A&HEIT RECOUP - SORTING PH.OOHAM and 
flujtaiuit ward-prn«*tO' pro*ram. SlMfAllUTl 4Bti 
m-dnve, maaiy *Blll*l*d tliltamera *Otl**»rJa 
Only «95 aach, .1* P*P Dolaila? SAE to PB 
Sohwana. S BaaMtnMHKt Bo*al, ChlpDBn4«m, WJH- 
ahire. S**U OEZ. 

ATATRTTK9 PACKAGE m«nu rjnyan. W options. 
DYB-a'jei. iianda-nt devttlioni, CQrrnlaliom. t>TK>- 
miaJ. hi*ti3gran», multiple raoraiian, anatyil* 
uajaaWBa pint, ate. Spacthim *BK £3.99 a< SAE 
deui't. «PH Software. 10 £«too« Way. ChUf- 
chdawn. Glot-coalei 

WOULD SEHISS tflJCKET. Cilt'l»in fc-ng'and ana net 
«nl Indies or WorM XI lnsm«n SPEECH fa.96. 
Alto ABGQ full 4SK nrJvtntura. Help Iha ijiaoruiuti 
ftndlhe golden H**MtS». *BK SpoclTirrn Boaart, 
Sonh, Dyt«l 

SERIOUS USERSI EraUife af (."■•*' 3D bunricii' 
uuliiy wlfla lar Specljum 4BK on -j" 1 Vu ca! iniMrl- 
Ce SeiMl fl iRefnHiit fifM sra*rS [o SOMiao- 
5yiHjma (SUL PO Boa S*. Hilcliir., Harti SAE 1or 
liajt only 

SPECTRUM 4*K. Joymick ind minrf ace, lape tncOr- 
dtf ov«r So oarnes. 90 nujanlnani, all still boned 
KWUlh fSfltl lor CtMhino. Sknliaifl B74SM lA"v 
l.ipn«? win deliver Gla*OOW araai. 

OL F0<t SAUt with coVB*. Cut) monilar (maiall IS 
boatwl cjrrridaos. 3 aof1w»«t boaai. All only 1 
monSM nld and im*ar yp*rr*JMy, olfara £100 below 
•hop pnoa. TH! >DT3Se 71*35 

4TJK SPECTRUM IlKtrnnica fcoybOaJ-n Cheetah 
EweelalliFr. Riilfflnitt w»1»rlri™. >i> walnn »p(^o>: 
l'Ju rrngariiaB. upprox 1 1 cananat, IW recoriter 
■nd leads, tiffera? Write J.Evsin fj'o Arundel Am, 
Flixton, Lhrriiinn. Mancheater 

FULLER FD SPfCtnuM taybward far tala. Unuaed, 
tulty wurkihg. t^pturn manv airvgla aey lunctiana. 
ruraora etL t«» rm'ds Spoclmm inierface. PSU, 
wrtli nn/arf iWilch £30oriii T»l' (Frank! G23* 

nxm 

SPtCTWJH W ' INTEraTAffl I B«Hhrr HP5 
ptinrUr, 2 micradnvea, 20 cartnalgfHL tranalprn-i 
tun Soflw*in include! TannMXlt Two. Hail MdrO,*, 
Miller Fim. Omniurlc I and Sryla iVrflar & gamei, 
only £2»?i 1ha lot Tal: B1-5*S WOfl. 

MAGAZHE OF TIPS ND 2. Hundred* of lip* *"" 
potiea on Hi lie latea! osfri*t Itla Minder. Shadow- 
F-re Ba*«CKIII and hunrtr«ll mora, eend Wp and 4 
ttamp 10 /HOnacpl 15U;. tl H«Bd*lan* L*n», 
Harrow Mirtdleaer. HA? WW 



POOLS PREDICTION 

Outputa beral dcawi. tuxiias ondawftya Poaajres 

araaMcal rmw nncap. Prm* laam Irgm jajmpan- 

pan araprai AnaJyaea and Qfaphs ratiUta awary 

w*« TaMa.fL4acy»urri0findwaaaoafflaaand 

■Cup" maichei bstv^en mam league taonK 

PrwrnMOfi relaoattjn option (Can t« used 1r-m 

aeauwn to Beaton > Eaxy to u3S, aven tor begir- 

nets T40 latdly dnlehaie 'aqwrajd Oivaa paper 

pnrrlout c* pradiclieina if faourW 

fiiA\ &Bjek-up a#TV!&* Ail custc-rrteifl latlera 

aixnnred (ifompfly 

36 win* (ZSJ dhndaeida, nscetaad 0* PU*lpr Hi 

lav 

■The uj In* bait and rnosi acirsniihc ol any 

proflram I ham aaeti- -Mr BAP (Secretary. 

OnaVplDn ComoUnl' Ca*l 

'Once again, IhBTlfc yw 1pr one at Hi* bast 

irmaarasntl I twy* mada>- - Mf D.L9. (Ff*aan) 

MwraikJ»>a10K«igra^lalByouoPyojri«caaaail 

aarvtoa - * a a rans aang Iheea c*ir»" - ** LQ .P 

.C-'nrw^l- ■'•■• 

RACING PREDICTIONS 

An ea*y Id use pieOVSOr. by the same auirasr. 1nr 
Bn* Hal ■*£**) MBHn No knowte<Hja Of ratine. 

■aquM 

input infornujim Irmn any SBJly nearapapor 
Howjr, 4«1a an draw advantage and ground 

cendmona tor 3T taniiah ccuriae 
SoH-laacnHie; pfOfp*™ « newer aul-uf-date 

Aak*af;BWa«*lP00l!l fllW 

AumralujnPpal EH* 

fUlRacmo C11.M 

Alta* 7 day* tea deavery. Chaquff . P O's pay- 

afilf lo Ftcmbeit 0- quCeV Acorn, EurOEaf d or 

UHtarcaid 

OvorseaB coslumfira pleaae add Hi far P^P 

ROMEJclST, Dept SU, 

I Welland Crott, EtlcBalBf . 

Oxim., OK8 8C0- 

T*Hi (0«&> !4MC2. 

A«ailablt- lor «K Sp«trum. 

Corrmwfloi* ft* nwnon available aoon. 



SEVEN STABS 
COVER THE SPECTRUM 

GENEH-80 is Ihe ulb-alasl (3000 
lines m '0 sacs!) assembler wrhn a 
superb lull-sawn edttO* C7.S5 
MOOER-ftO is a handy mcoilor^dis- 
assennhlt>f with a buiN-in Trani-aa- 
sembler £5-S5 

PHOFILA rs a Zi80 dCttvrty ptolitef 
(48K o* Plus). Bar-chart shows ihe 
"botttenecka" m youf Basic ^^1 mfc 
programs £4.95 

TASPflO enables Tasword T*g to 
lustily using equal spaces be»v*een 
words! Please state your printer and 
interface. £4.95 

Fast mail order (Efface add CI, 
airmail add £2> Selected pfoducts 
also v*a rAcfone! 800 Dealers 
welcome Leaflet an request. 

Sewn Stars PuNrfMw* (Dept U), 
34 S»arrtl Km. Marinr, lwiua.7lr1l 



MOUDAV PROORAMHERS. Compeinnl * 180 
aaaaanbly lanouasie wrrri graphic *es:on .nivretl 
Office wwrL kh^Wid in London hi CDr-lwl M 
SmrMi, ModkS&m. 11 0»ritwni Sf , lalingtun, Londen 

SWAP ZX*1 Spactrum m Cornmodnfo lapo* ei«n 
from one Iyp*m another biy chgioa Irom 50p Buy 
below |iel< put* SAE tot Hat, AP. *aViciatla Straei, 
Slackbu-K BP1 SDN 



MAKE YOUR MONEY GROW 
£££ Gains of over 307* E££ 

'WHICHTRUSr 

Investmenl program evail^Wa for 

BBC - Etecrjon - 4flK Spectrum 

QL- CkimrnodorB 64 

Analyse different Irusls from over 1 

year s riaia. Program ts me*Hii dm«n 

shows progness charts, bar charts. 

indicates when lo buy & sell units. 

Send lor detail! to: 

DATA COMPUTING 
SYSTEMS 

25 Denny View, Portlshesd, 
Bristol BS7Q BBT 



SKCTRUM WE fat lata. With AD upaa, fX'tromca 
aayooarda Would lika fl» PSaia pMMia «1 JM 



Advertisement Index 

ACSSoftware 102 Looic Sales ....... 



m 



Anirog 



IBC 



Betasnfi 62 K'™^" 

Micron et 

Cambridge Micro Electronics 76 

Capital Computers 66 

CP Software 57 

Crass Soltware 99 

Cumana 29 



Mann Tapes , 62 

102 

90,91.105 

MikroGen ... 49 

Mirage Microcomputers , 40 

Modem House 23,12 

Monolith 65 

Mr Software 4 



PERIPHERALS SEIKOSHA SPlMA PHNTEFf Tea 
man inl*rfacn and misroiUjl £140. hnlmipan £11. 
layitu-k .r-mrfica HO, alto aoftmarc. Tflru«)r{| [a, 
VU-10 ES. Taolfcrt Efl. Piinrtbgi C6, Tol kMdlow 
KH8. aih for Oamimc 

roll 4»H SPECTRUM and micnaariin. GripH* 

sduanture, Tin* Cavei a* Elp*rtlh, aerxt S«t Aj 
£S.M ChedU* 0' PO pay-abl* «j Mr P Fernanda*; 3J 
SouthmeaJ Cnjacant. Cn-Wisrna, SomonMIt TrMB 
IflQj. Spec'li^m > rjorrHpaflbla 

SOFTWARE CLXLfiCTKJN FOR SPECTBUM. srtlina 
AbonJl 100 ^MQinal prDgrarna,. all lypaa: oamaa, 
Adventure utility. aAicalinn, vtklO 'vj prune. SAE 1 or 
hat !□ 78 PiKjry W*v. Harrow, hbdatii. HA2 BOH 

SPECTRUM HTCKr-ACE KM S»A( Mft makei 
bacaupcopieS on ngrrnaa Eleudrftia from every 
program o^i Up*, microdrvve. **radriwB, diskdr ^e 
No rr-BcrniiiCode Irvowleda* (wfed. Eval'nn 
tfK.Kr.aa0. yuuraa Draaf. 7S-3T39KS. tWHaadat, 
flading, Holland- 



Datasiar ■■ - 2S 

Data Distributors 33 

Datel 66 

Domarli - — 67 

East London Rabotics 87 

EifJersott 25 

Electronic Maintenance 

Services 14 

Euro Electronics 74 

Eve-snam 102 

Firebirg Software 21 

Fox Electronics 94 

Frel 74 

Gargoyle Games 44 

GCETutorinfl .... 76 

Glen Top Publishing 25 

Goodbyte S3 

Gremlin G rap flics 34.35 

Hewson Consultants 27 



National Software Library 48 

New Horizon 51 

Ocean 36 

Opus Supplies . ,, 50,38 

Radolin ... 58.59 

Ram Electronics 42,43 

Romantic Robots ,. 51 

Rotromcs 73 

RSD Connections 96 

Saga Systems 41 

Selec 14 

Simitron 88 

SMT.. 40,48 

Spectrum Holdings 66 

Speedy Soft 30 

Talent 12 

Tasman Software 70,71 

Tec Publications 23 

Ttietford Micro . .62 

Thoughts 8 Crosses 88 

Transform 68,72 



Imagine .-■ 0BC 

IT'S 99 US Gold 



18,19 



Kempston 

Lbnti 



IPC Vortex 63 

88 Walkers Computers 99 



112 



SINCLAIR USER Augm 1985 




r.™ 



Ever sent off a cheque for the Latest software and the goods never arrived? Or rushed home with your 

brand new computer only to find that it didn't work? 

Well it's not tough luck because theme are a number of laws to protect you, 

Next month we'll te II you what they are. 

All this and more in next month's Sinclair User, 




Reach an estimated readership of over 200,000 users per month for as little as £5.00* (ine VAT) 
Or if you are starting your own small business advertise in the supermart for only £17. DO (ine VAT) 
Yes all you have to do is fill in the coupon below including your name, address and telephone number 
andsent to: Supermart, Sinclair User, EMAP, Priory Court, 30-32 Farrmgdon Lane, London EC1R 3AU 
Maximum 30 words. Your advert will appear in the earliest possible edition , 



m 



Name ... 
Address 



.Tel: 



Have you included the fee of £5.00* or £17.00? 

Make cheques payable to EMAP PUBLICATIONS LTD 



'for second hand sales only 



»*«r llM ,rt,rti* ti# KcioiBd ujbiKi <**»r<*ji el copy ind lo ih* rijhi or A* AdHrtiigiwi; wtiwm i"i< fin« w cincm *>t fl^tf rni+t mitHm a 
tmmt »>mw ivn do [In, micuH fcrt"li|» If finlt'i' »"ori 



,. IS **»**« »h>«'*riMWf* irVK*Wir» in niipact nH in Cteim, coir infl UJmmi viMrvwil 9' **V I4*U9V » minoDiii iFvinr . • 



SINCLAIR USER ^afiwtt ;9S5 



113 




MAXWELL 
SAVES THE 
UNIVERSE 



ROBERT MAXWELL, 
who owns the world's 
favourite newspaper, 
has been acclaimed a 
national hero. He has 
coma to the aid of 
another great British 
asset, boffin Sir Clive 
Sinclair. 

Maxwell stepped ifl to save 

Slugger's company, generous- 
ly paying EI 2m for the pri- 
vilege of helping to make Bri- 
tain great again. 

Toe bouncing Czech's 
knowledge of commuters and 
programmes is legend. A stun- 
ned world listened as Max- 
well, speaking on BBC Radio 
4, dearly pronounced the 

word 'software 1 , saying Sinc- 
lair's wis 'cxccllcm 1 . He also 




JUST GOOD FRIENDS: Clive and Bob 



praised other inventions from 
'Sinclair Electronics', includ- 
ing 'the telephone . . . and 
many other things.' 

Slugger himself, a one-time 
associate of Maxwell's, said he 

was very pleased. In a recent 
\(uii' i in Sumlav ankle he said; 



"I have suffered a great deal 
from ineptitude" 1 . Mow Cap'n 
Bub is a! the helm, that will 
change. Any further such arti- 
cles arc unlikely to appear 

anywhere other than in your 
own value-fur-money Big-3 

BuigO Sunday AiurtT. 



OH WHAT A 
PUNCH-UP! 



BRITAIN faces a violent 
summer, as software 
houses prepare to do 
battle with games 
based on boxing. 



Gremlin Graphics enters the 
ring with Hocro, licensed 
from Spanish comapny Dina- 
miL. Gremlin has changed the 
name from Rocky after MGM 

complained. Apparently the 




INCORRUPTIBLE 



Scolding gazes 



Editor 

blankly at a Commode 64 with karate champ Jeoff 
Thompson. He's waiting for Melbourne House to 
return his grubby corduroys from the launderette- 



graphics make Sylvester Stal- 
lone's acting look like the pro- 
duct of a ZX-8C . 

Meanwhile, the Kindergar- 
ten responds with Frank Bru- 
no's Boxing, also based nn 
arcade game Punch Out! The 
kids at Eile reckon Big Frank 
can lay the Span.is.ti challenger 
cold on the canvas inside three 
nmnds. 

Ttie only winner appears to 
be Silvcrsofu which thought it 
bad the rights to Rocky until 
Dinamk revealed the deal 
with Gremlin Graphics. Sii- 
versoft has thus retired from 
the ring to promote Satanism 
with its new game Baal, a 
vicarage tea party compared to 
the fight game scene. 



ROBSON:Over the top? 

DOUBTS have been cast 
over England Captain Bryan 
Robaon's commitment to the 
game after he failed to turn 

up for a fixture at Hamieys 
toyshop in London 1 ! Regent 
Street. 

Il seems he was ilouhje- 
bouked, which sounds like 
l"L"l-A's latest ploy to combat 
English Soccer violence. 



misses 
game 



Bryan wis supposed to be 
launching Bryan Rofaaon't 
Super League, a computer- 
moderated board game. The 
game is unique, acccmling to 
publisher Paul Lamond Ltd, 
because it uses the computer 

to 'heighten excitement'. 

All nthcr computer board 

games use the computer |o 
bore people to death. 



■■*■ 





PEACE THROUGH STRENGTH: Our boys are 
ready for anything. 

MAJOR-GENERAL 'Quickshot II' Goodman prac- 
tices zapping Russians with Durr ell's Combat 
Lynx. Watch Qui Gorbachev — you're next. 

Good luck! 

SVELTE, laid-back Rob 
Cameron, long- suffering 
advertising manager for Sinc- 
lair User, is leaving. 

All his friends — inert are 
at least Two — wish, bun well 
as he prepares la set Gam- 
bridge an fire with burning 
promotional literature , 

Rob is replaced by Louise 
'WPC Fantharpe, whose 
Mtfl voice and severe Iwin- 

aets have long graced the 
office In <«b«r pottoon*. 



Hermit 

PAUL DUFFY, the 
peripatetic hermit, ex- 
GOSH. ex PRISM has 
gone to where the ac- 
tion is and joined Mir- 
rorsoft. 

Omuu'ouaty, the latest 
press release says: "You 
could throw this sheet away, 

hut you might lose touch 
with Mirrorsofl for ever! 1 ' 
His the curse of the Silent 
One already struck P 



SHOULDN'T HAVE. 
THOUGHT YOU NEEDED 
A COMPUTER TO 
DETAIL>OURGOOD 
JOINTS BUT... DO 

COME IN 




FQREPLAY: Clive ogles Jane. 
MIRROR sweetheart Jane learns the Basics from 
friendly Uncle Clive. During the course of the 
lesson, she manages to loss all her clothes. 



114 



SINCLAIR USER August 1985 




Every pilot has 

the dream of 

flying one of 

these unique and 

complex fighting 

machines. Here is your chance to do what few pilots have the 

privilege to try. 

Depending on your skill, confidence and courage, you have the 

choice of remaining near the landing pad, learning to hover 

and land, or venturing higher to practise your approaches. 

When you think you have mastered these, then accelerate the 

Jump Jet into an attack fighter. Use the radar and range finder to seek and destroy the 

enemy, by launching heat-seeking air-to-air missiles. Beware! His radar and missile 

systems are as good as yours. Reckless pursuit is ill-advised: you must maintain a fuel 

level that will enable you to relocate and return to the aircraft carrier, executing the 

skills you have learned to achieve a successful landing. 

You are now ready to proceed to the next skill level to face additional hazards, such as 

unpredictable swell and treacherous cross-winds. 

Be warned, this program is not a toy or game. You will need to co-ordinate your hands, 

eyes and mind to successfully complete each mission. Do not hope to achieve in a 

short time that which took the author three years to learn as a Jump Jet pilot, and 

over a year to record on this computer program. 



TRADE ENQUIRIES: ANIROG SOFTWARE LTD UNIT 10 VICTORIA INDUSTRIAL PARK VICTORIA ROAD DARTFORD KENT (0322) 92S13/8 
Mail Qniar: S HIGH STREET HORLEY SURREY 24 HOUR CREDIT SALES HOflLEY 02034 6083 Paymant by: P.O. ACCESS VISA 













The officially e idorsed version 
of the No. I a p cade game by 

Kjon ami 

Available^ Continuing the challenge ^^ 
A/OlVwhere Track and Field' left off. NOW 



Ilmagkn* Software Is available from : 'jS/^j . "■ H c M ■ TH ^ ^IJ-LMAJ Mill WHMKMKKKfH hskt s ftumtwIows O — i t , , Spectrum Shoes and all <aood dealers. 
Imagine Software (1984) Limited- 6 Central Street- Manchester- M2 BMS-Tel : 06 1 834 3939